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A Global Shift in Foreign Aid, Starting in India

Discussion in 'World Economy' started by santosh, Mar 25, 2014.

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  1. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    @Averageamerican
    @forjeet
    @varchasva

    in fact, exchange rate was US$1.0 = 44 Rupees only in 2011, which means around $80billion+ reverse remittances from India in 2011 :coffee:

    here, high professional indian migrants/ migrant indian businessmen doing business in foreign nations, send money after paying very high tax as Indian migrants are the highest income group in western nations, who are part of generating technologies to run their Industries/ running business there and hence pay very high tax to those governments this way too, etc etc, and then India received around $60billion remittances in 2011. while around $80.00billion+ Reverse remittances from India without proper tax????????????

    isn't is looting of India now days, in the same way as before 1947? how foreign companies and other sources are so successful in taking out money from India, "without paying tax also"??????
     
  2. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    A Philantrocapitalism Donation

    its interesting that Indian Annual Aid for different countries is over US$1.0 billion+ every year, as part of Indian Annual Budget. while US recently gave $150,000 aid for the Uttarakhand flood victims :rofl: :tsk:. while the government of India itself allocated over IRN1000crore+ as the 'first package' for the disaster :india:

    US Announced 150000 US Dollar Financial Aid for Uttarakhand
     
  3. forjeet

    forjeet Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    @santosh Aid is Aid so never :rofl: ..............if u like take it or reject it

    and India will take another 100yrs to reach US per capita
     
  4. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    @Averageamerican


    Outward FDI Exceed Inward Flows
    NEW DELHI, MAY 22

    India’s overseas investments reached close to 27 billion dollars, exceeding the inflows on equity account of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in fiscal 2012-13, ASSOCHAM findings revealed here today. :coffee:

    The study said India’s overseas investment, comprising loans, equity and loans guaranteed aggregated to 26.83 billion dollars in financial year 2012-13, with maximum outflows taking place in October-January. However, the maximum outflow took place in June touching 3.53 billion dollars, the study said.

    It said overseas investments would exceed the FDI inflows on account of equity capital which totalled nearly 21 billion dollars between April- February of the fiscal 2012-13, the latest period for which data is available. Unlike in March, 2012, when one or two big ticket investments had pushed the monthly figure to a new high, there was no major inflow during March, 2013, the study said. :ranger:

    The study says in so far as the outward investments from India are concerned, they have mostly gone to Singapore, the Netherlands and a significant amount to the tax haven of Cayman Islands. For instance in March, out of the 1.88 billion dollars of total overseas investments, close to one billion dollars went to Cayman Islands.

    The study said although India's overseas investment is higher than the inward inflows, the overall investment climate in most parts of the globe is a dampener. “Risk aversion and lack of investment appetite is seen all through. It is not that only India is losing its position as an investment destination, but there is a demand slowdown and over capacity in many parts of the globe,” according to the findings.

    The study reveals that investment from Indian companies abroad has gone in areas relating to manufacturing, trade, restaurants, agri business and mining businesses. :thumb: On the other hand, recent bullish trends in the global stock markets are seen riding on quantitative easing and printing of money by central banks, mainly in the United States, some European countries and significantly in Japan. UNI

    http://mg.glpublications.in/epaperpdf//2352013//2352013-md-hr-2.pdf

    http://mg.glpublications.in/epaperpdf//2352013//2352013-md-hr-2.pdf
     
  5. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Poor Little Rich Country
    BY PATRICK FRENCH | JUNE 24, 2011

    How do you categorize India, a nation that is at once fantastically wealthy and desperately poor?

    [​IMG]

    In May, the Indian government announced that it was giving $5 billion in aid to African countries in the interest of helping them meet their development goals. "We do not have all the answers," Prime Minister Manmohan Singh said, "but we have some experience in nation-building, which we are happy to share."

    The British could be forgiven for being annoyed with Singh's largesse. Britain, after all, currently gives more than $450 million a year in aid to India, and has plans to continue doing so for at least the next few years. The British economy is bumping in and out of a recession, while India's gross domestic product is growing at more than 8 percent a year. This has put the British government in the rather bizarre position of having to sell bonds in order to donate money to Asia's second-fastest-growing economy, even as the latter is itself getting into the philanthropy business.

    The policy is unpopular with most of the British press, which argues that because India has a space program and some flamboyant billionaires, it does not need aid -- especially when Britain cannot really afford it. (When the Labour government was voted out at last year's general election, the departing Finance Minister Liam Byrne left a one-line note on his desk for his successor: "I'm afraid there is no money." It was a joke -- but it was also true.) Nevertheless, Britain still sees itself as a donor nation, with all the obligations and international prestige that entails. This comes in part from a sense of postcolonial guilt: Prime Minister David Cameron spoke recently of a "sense of duty to help others" and the "strong moral case" for giving aid.

    The situation suggests just how dramatically the economic rise of Asia has undone centuries of experience, and the expectation that the West will retain the hegemony it has had for the past 400 years. It is increasingly difficult to classify whether a nation is rich or poor, and terms such as "the Global South" and "the Third World" have to be heavily qualified to take into account the fact that large sections of the population in countries like China, Brazil, and India now have a purchasing power matching that of people in "the West."

    In 1951, the American diplomat Bill Bullitt described the condition of India in Life magazine: "An immense country containing 357 million people," he wrote, "with enormous natural resources and superb fighting men, India can neither feed herself nor defend herself against serious attacks. An inhabitant of India lives, on average, 27 years. His annual income is about $50. About 90 out of 100 Indians cannot read or write. They exist in squalor and fear of famine." Today, it would be hard to make such an absolute statement about India. Poverty certainly remains a chronic problem, but it exists alongside pockets of substantial wealth. An Indian's life expectancy at birth now stands at 67 years, and continues to rise. It is necessary perhaps to think in a different way, and to see that a country like India, like Schrödinger's cat, exists in at least two forms simultaneously: rich and poor. :coffee:

    The most important change of the last two decades, since the beginning of economic liberalization, has been the transformation of middle-class Indian aspiration. Although the stagnant days of the controlled economy and the "Permit Raj" -- when important decisions depended on a bureaucrat's authorization -- had their own stability, they also stifled opportunity and individual talent. Members of the professional middle class frequently preferred to seek their fortune in more meritocratic societies abroad.

    The modern Indian middle class has a new chance to shape its own destiny in a way that was not previously possible. You can move to your own house using a home loan and live outside the joint family; you can buy a car that is not an Ambassador or a Fiat; you can travel abroad and see how people in other countries live; you can watch your politicians accept bribes or dance with prostitutes on television in local media sting operations while surfing your way to Desperate Housewives or Kaun Banega Crorepati, an Indian adaptation of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? Businesspeople who have succeeded on their own merits overseas, such as PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi, are presented as national heroes.

    Poor Little Rich Country - By Patrick French | Foreign Policy
     
  6. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    India's growing stake in Afghanistan
    28 June 2012

    India is flexing its soft power muscles this week by hosting an international investment conference on Afghanistan, barely a week before another global gathering in Tokyo to pledge aid. The BBC's South Asia correspondent Andrew North examines the deepening ties between India and Afghanistan.

    On a recent flight from Kabul to Delhi none of the Afghan passengers were surprised when take-off was delayed.

    Business class was still empty. Some VIPs must be running late, they concluded.

    They were right, except the late arrivals turned out to be very important policemen - among them a colonel - severely injured in another insurgent assault on Kabul.

    It is quicker to fly to next-door Pakistan. But when officials like this need help, Afghanistan would rather trust its old friend India to look after them.


    Battle for influence

    Encouraged by the US and its Nato allies as they prepare to retreat in 2014, India and Afghanistan are deepening their ties, to the frustration of their neighbour sandwiched in-between.

    The two states signed a strategic partnership last year, which among other things promises more Indian help in building up Afghan security forces.

    More than 100 Afghan officers are already attending Indian military colleges, with the number set to rise.

    In effect, the next round of the age-old battle for influence in Afghanistan has begun.

    India is watching closely the actions there of its huge northern rival China, which has secured rights to vast copper deposits.

    The Indian government is keen to emphasise the soft power side of its strategy, such as Thursday's gathering at a plush Delhi hotel aimed at attracting more foreign investment into Afghanistan.

    "Let the grey suits of businessmen take the place of the olive green fatigues of soldiers and generals in Afghanistan," Indian Foreign Minister SM Krishna told a conference hall filled with would-be investors.

    In financial terms, India is already one of the biggest players in Afghanistan.

    It has pledged or spent some $2bn (£1.3bn) worth of aid over the last decade to build roads, power stations and even the Afghan parliament.


    'New silk road'

    India has been rewarded with rights to mine Afghanistan prime iron ore reserves.

    It is state companies who are leading the way so far though.

    Private investors at the conference seemed to be doing more window-shopping rather than being ready to invest - with many nervous about events after the Nato pull-out.

    But for Indian companies there is an open door, from the Afghan street to the presidential palace.


    Afghan President Hamid Karzai did his university studies in India and speaks Hindi. :smile:

    Walk through central Kabul and you soon lose count of the number of places selling Indian music and movies.

    While you never hear a good word about Pakistan, you rarely hear a bad one about India.

    Afghan officials at the Delhi meeting were talking of a "new silk road" between the two countries, even though Commerce Minister Anwar ul-Haq Ahadi admits Afghanistan is still "one of the riskiest places in the world to do business".

    But go to a private Delhi hospital and you see a new kind of silk road already emerging, with a boom in Afghan medical tourism.

    It is not just security personnel coming for specialist care, but thousands of other Afghans for routine operations.

    Some hospitals now have separate reception desks with staff speaking the two main Afghan languages to handle the numbers.

    As most Afghan patients pay with wads of crisp dollars, the hospitals want them to keep coming.

    Locals in Delhi's Lajpat Nagar district, where many Afghan medical tourists stay, joke it should be renamed "Little Kabul".

    The connections between the two nations are set to get physical, if a recently signed deal to pipe gas 1,700km (1,056 miles) from Turkmenistan across Afghanistan and Pakistan to India goes ahead.

    India's state gas company is one of the leaders of a consortium trying to persuade global investors to stump up $7.6bn (£5bn) for the so-called TAPI pipeline later this year.

    It is a rebirth for an old idea which US companies tried to get the Taliban to sign up to before 9/11 - and with the route by-passing Iran, the Americans are encouraging it again.

    With the obvious security challenge of trying to lay and protect a pipeline not just across Afghanistan - but also the troubled Pakistani province of Balochistan - the project has been derided by some in India as, well, a pipe dream which leaves Delhi beholden to its old enemy Pakistan.

    There are fears it will only increase the risks India faces in Afghanistan.

    It has already lost diplomats in bomb attacks on its in Kabul embassy - attacks India says were carried out by Pakistani-backed groups.

    Getting in deeper only inflames India-Pakistan tensions, some argue.


    Strategic self-interest

    Why does not India just get out and leave "Af to Pak" asked a column by Shekhar Gupta, the influential editor of the Indian Express.

    Foreign ministry spokesman Syed Akrabuddin says India's presence is about its own strategic self-interest.

    "Afghanistan is in our neighbourhood and there is a history of Afghan soil being used for terror attacks on India. We can't have that again," he said.

    The truth is that few Indians pay much attention to their government's policy in Afghanistan.

    If they consider the country at all, they think of it as a place of suicide attacks.

    But there is a kinder image too, from the Kabuliwalla story taught in many Indian schools - about a poor Afghan who comes to Calcutta to work to pay off his debts and befriends a young girl.

    The many Afghans coming to India for medical treatment or business are showing another side to their country too, one Indians realise they can benefit from.

    Delhi's "Little Kabul" looks set to keep growing.

    BBC News - India's growing stake in Afghanistan
     
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  7. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    India’s foreign aid program catches up with its global ambitions

    Citing its newfound economic strength, India revealed plans to reorient its positioning in the aid community just over a decade ago.

    “A stage has come in our development where we should now, firstly, review our dependence on external donors. Second, extend support to the national efforts of other developing countries,” said then-Indian Finance Minister Jaswant Singh in February 2003. :india:

    Since then, India’s ambition of transitioning from aid recipient to donor hasn’t panned out completely. Despite its increasingly dismissive posture toward Western aid donors, the Indian government still receives billions of dollars in foreign aid money each year. In 2011, India’s official development assistance to gross national income ratio stood at 0.2 percent, on a par with Egypt and Angola and up from 0.1 percent in 2003.

    Yet even as India remains among the largest recipients of foreign aid, the country has come a long way toward bolstering its standing as an emerging donor. In its latest budget unveiled in February, the Indian government set aside nearly $1.3 billion for foreign assistance in 2013-14, a fourfold jump from 2003-04. Over the past four years, Indian foreign aid spending has grown annually by an average 32 percent. :coffee:

    [​IMG]

    Much like its BRICS peers, New Delhi is keen on enhancing its global reputation through its foreign aid program. Experts on Indian foreign assistance have told Devex that India is likely to continue ramping up aid spending despite fiscal pressures brought about by its recent economic slowdown.

    “The intensity, volume and scope of [Indian] aid giving has remained immune from the government’s austerity drives which have reduced the spending power of various ministries,” Shanthie Mariet D’Souza, a research fellow with the Institute of South Asian Studies at the National University of Singapore, pointed out.

    Some members of the parliament in New Delhi have been less confident of the Indian foreign aid program’s budgetary position. Just last month, a standing committee of India’s lower house of parliament warned that the Ministry of External Affairs’ budget was no longer commensurate with its foreign aid and diplomatic activities.

    Technical cooperation continues to account for the bulk of Indian foreign assistance. In 2012-13, Indian spending on technical cooperation activities reached $589 million, representing 58 percent of the country’s foreign aid budget. The Indian government also makes sizeable contributions to multilateral organizations, including the U.N. Development Program and the World Health Organization. :india:

    USAID-style aid agency delayed yet again

    In 2007, Indian Finance Minister P. Chidambaram announced the government’s intention to establish a full-fledged Indian aid agency. But despite repeated pronouncements from New Delhi in the years since, the agency that would have been modeled after the U.S. Agency for International Development has yet to materialize.

    New Delhi’s aid program is mostly under the purview of the Ministry of External Affairs, which taps specialists from within its ranks and across the Indian government to carry out its programming. India has also channeled its aid money through other ministries, however, including the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry of Defense. The proposed USAID-style aid agency would have consolidated the administration of Indian foreign aid activities under one roof.

    In January 2012, the Indian government launched a coordinating and monitoring body for Indian foreign assistance within the Ministry of External Affairs called the Development Partnership Administration. Dweep Chanana, an expert on Indian foreign aid who is currently a director with UBS’ philanthropic division, told Devex the DPA could eventually evolve into a full-fledged aid agency.

    Yet while the creation of the DPA is widely acknowledged as a positive step for the decentralized and fragmented Indian aid program, many observers caution the Indian foreign aid and diplomacy apparatus remains woefully understaffed.

    Thus far, the Ministry of External Affairs has assigned only 20 staff members to the DPA. Moreover, the ministry’s overstretched diplomatic corps of 900 foreign service officers — roughly equal to that of Singapore — is raising valid questions over India’s ability to engage effectively with its development partners overseas. New Delhi is increasingly looking to its diplomatic missions to appraise funding requests from other governments.

    “This is a general problem for India’s foreign service. There are not enough diplomats,” Chanana asserted.

    Focus close to home

    In line with its status as a regional power, India has been a leading aid donor to its smaller neighbors Bhutan and Nepal since the 1950s. The two countries have historically received the lion’s share of Indian foreign assistance.

    India’s economic considerations for its aid program are on display in Bhutan, where its assistance focuses on developing the hydropower sector. The Indian government openly acknowledges that it intends to buy back much of the electricity generated through its hydropower assistance to the country. In 2012-13, Bhutan claimed 36 percent ($213 million) of India’s technical cooperation spending.

    Meanwhile, small-scale development projects in Nepal’s health and education sectors have emerged as priority investments for Indian foreign aid. Nepal received 8 percent ($49 million) of India’s technical cooperation budget in 2012-13.

    And in a development that has been strongly encouraged by the United States, Afghanistan has rapidly moved up the Indian aid agenda since the fall of the Taliban regime in 2001. Now the second-largest recipient of Indian foreign aid after Bhutan, Afghanistan garnered 15 percent ($89 million) of Indian technical cooperation spending in 2012-13. A new parliament building in Kabul, a hydroelectric dam in Herat province as well as community-level development initiatives are among the projects backed by the Indian government.

    Polls suggest India’s aid program in Afghanistan has been generally well-received by Afghans — perhaps no surprise given the two countries’ long-standing cultural ties. As Afghanistan braces for reduced aid levels in light of the NATO drawdown, there are some signs demand for Indian development engagement is growing in the country.

    “When I visited Jalalabad, the TV station manager wanted more of India’s assistance in training of local journalists … In Kandahar, women at an Indian medical facility wanted more medical help,” D’Souza said to Devex as she recounted her recent field visits to Afghanistan.

    The Indian government emphasizes that its aid activities in Afghanistan and elsewhere are demand-driven, a claim which has been supported to some extent by Indian aid experts, including D’Souza.

    Expanding to Africa

    Yet even as much of India’s aid money remains close to home, India has also extended the reach of its assistance well beyond South Asia. In large part through its deputation of technical experts abroad, the Indian aid program now spans more than 60 countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America. :coffee:

    India has been particularly keen on expanding its aid engagement with Africa. In 2012-13, African countries received 7 percent ($43 million) of India’s technical cooperation budget, up from 4 percent in 2011-12. The emerging donor stresses its willingness to share lessons from its own development with Africa.

    “India will work with Africa to realize its vast potential … We do not have all the answers but we have some experience in nation building which we are happy to share with our African brothers and sisters,” Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh told African heads of state attending the second India-Africa Forum Summit in Addis Ababa in 2011.

    In Addis Ababa, Singh committed $700 million in assistance to establish educational institutions and training programs across Africa, including in Uganda, Ghana, Botswana and Burundi. The Indian prime minister also announced $5 billion in lines of credit — largely tied to the purchase of Indian goods and services — to African countries. The Indian government is expected to make further aid commitments for the continent at the third India-Africa Forum Summit in the summer of 2014. :coffee:

    The Indian aid program has already drawn upon its strengths in the ICT sector to create Africa’s largest tele-education and telemedicine initiative, the $125 million Pan-African e-Network. Kicked off in 2006, India’s flagship aid initiative in the continent now connects 47 African countries with leading schools and hospitals in India through satellite and fiber-optic links.

    Devex.com
    May 13, 2013


    India’s foreign aid program catches up with its global ambitions | Asia
     
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  8. forjeet

    forjeet Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Bhutan claimed 36 percent ($213 million) of India’s technical cooperation spending,In 2012-13.......... India's 30 state
    Nepal received 8 percent ($49 million) of India’s technical cooperation budget in 2012-13................ 31st state

    Nepal&Bhutan r India's responsibility because of geography&Politics (if we can't China will enter)


    Afghanistan garnered 15 percent ($89 million) of Indian technical cooperation spending in 2012-13.... political compulsion

    Means almost 6o% forced aid, u also check we provide aid to Maldives/SL/BD to avoid China interference
    Means still we are not termed as donor country may be it will take another 2-4 yrs then may be
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2014
  9. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

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    @santosh I don't know what this forum would do without your contribution man, keep posting!!

    Hats off!!
     
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  10. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    India announces $ 500 mn aid for poor nations

    New Delhi: Underlining its commitment to South-South cooperation, India on Friday announced another $500 million aid for a host of projects in Least Developed Countries (LDCs) and offered to share its developmental experience with them.

    "Today, as the world's largest democracy, which supports fundamental human rights and human freedoms, we are proud of the progress we have been able to register to meet the economic aspirations of our people," External Affairs Minister SM Krishna said while inaugurating the two-day ministerial conference of LDCs.

    "We stand ready to share our experience with our friends and brethren in the Least Developed Countries," he said.

    Krishna announced a raft of additional contributions for LDCs, including another five scholarships every year under the Indian Technical and Economic Cooperation Programme for each LDC and a special fund of $5 million over the next five years for the follow up to UN LDC Four to be held in Istanbul in May.

    Krishna announced a $500 million credit line over the next five years to be used specifically for projects and programmes of LDCs.

    "South-South cooperation, the theme of this conference, and one of the cornerstones of Indian foreign policy, is one such innovative solution that has the potential to deliver real and tangible benefits to the Least Developed Countries and effectively supplement and complement existing international efforts," Krishna said. He, however, stressed that South-South cooperation is not a substitute for North-South cooperation.

    Around 35 foreign ministers and 40 Permanent Representatives to the UN from the LDCs are participating in the conference. The ministers called on Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Friday morning.

    The conference, which will act as a precursor to the fourth conference on LDCs in Istanbul May 9-13, is expected to come out with a Delhi Declaration outlining ambitious plans for spurring development of these countries.

    India enjoys a multi-dimensional relationship with LDCs and has been in the forefront of assisting their development through generous lines of credit and other forms of assistance. Over the decades, the foreign direct investment from India to LDC countries has increased dramatically, and is estimated to be around $35 billion. :india:

    India has provided 4.3 billion lines of credit to LDCs over the years. :tup:

    India announces $ 500 mn aid for poor nations - World - IBNLive
     
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  11. rocky.idf

    rocky.idf BANNED BANNED

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    1. BD has been repeatedly declining this offer. In fact we are going slow in accepting finance from traditional sources. Our economy is good with plenty forex reserves and regular export earning. All foreign finance are tied with various negative conditions. Indian credit has more negatives than others, if one looks at the compulsory terms laid down by law in India. Moreover we don't think it is such a good idea to shop in India only.We are used to dealing with WB, ADB and various national/international financial institutions. We understand well the underlying objectives of the donor.

    2. In the face of vehement opposition from outside and within the govt, the India-friendly BAL govt has signed the deal.The general feeling here is that this will oil the palms of politicians/bureaucrats in both countries more than anything else.If the idea was to project Indo-BD friendship,the opposite has occurred.
     
  12. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Bangladesh is the only LDC (Least Developed Country) of South Asia region, and hence it falls on many international benefits for what even more than half of the African nations also don't qualify. hence its clear that WB, ADB etc might be having enough favors for loans/aid for Bangladesh, true :coffee:

    Least developed country - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    India has over $1.3billion foreign aid for LDCs of different parts of world, as discussed in this thread. and it hardly matter whether Bangladesh wish to be one of those beneficiaries or not :tup:
    .
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2014
  13. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    India sets up global aid agency
    Development Partnership Administration has a corpus of $15 billion

    India has set up its own international aid agency similar to USAID and UK's Department for International Development (DFID), with an estimated corpus of a sizable $15-billion to be spent over the next five years. This new agency, called Development Partnership Administration (DPA), will oversee all the development partnership projects that India will undertake in developing countries around the world. DPA is headed by Ministry of External Affairs' (MEA) additional secretary P.S. Raghavan and will bring under one umbrella all agencies involved with foreign aid and development projects within the MEA. The DPA is being formed by streamlining three different organisations within the MEA that currently oversee India-sponsored development projects abroad. Foreign aid from the BRIC group of nations to other developing nations has increased drastically in the past few years, with a Global Humanitarian Association estimate suggesting foreign aid from Brazil, Russia, India and China more than doubling between 2005 and 2008. :cheers:

    "We do not like to call ourselves a donor," says Syed Akbaruddin, joint secretary with the Ministry of External Affairs. "We call it development partnership because it is in the framework of sharing development experiences. :india: It follows a model different from that followed in the conventional North-South economic cooperation patterns, hence the designation of Development Partnership Administration, it is administering our development partnership projects."

    Under the grants assistance scheme, India has made significant contributions in many countries, specifically in the South Asia region in the areas of education, IT, energy and healthcare.

    Efforts such as post-war reconstruction projects in Sri Lanka, hydroelectric power projects with Bhutan, which is the biggest recipient of Indian aid (Rs 1,330 cr in 2010-11), road connectivity projects with Myanmar, which will connect the India's Mizoram with the Myanmar port of Sittwe and recently a multitude of development projects in Afghanistan including recent plans to export more than 1.5 lakh tonnes of wheat to the struggling nation are some instances of India's growing influence via foreign development projects. :coffee:

    About ten years ago, Indian foreign aid projects were very limited both in terms of resources and geographical spread. However, today the reach of Indian aid has spread around the world with more than 60 countries benefiting from India sponsored projects. IT projects in many African nations have been a thrust area. "DPA is an agency meant to streamline implementation, not to lay down policy, not to contribute to policy," explains Akbaruddin. "We will only implement the policies given by the political wing of the MEA, the Minister, the Foreign Secretary, the Secretaries and the territorial divisions," he adds. :coffee:

    India's foreign projects under the DPA will work around strict considerations of mutual benefits. Many projects do have spin-offs of promotions of Indian exports and India's requirements to access all important international energy resources. For example, India's energy projects in Sudan and South Sudan have also provided opportunity for Indian companies to contribute to local communities via many social projects, including the recent distribution of thousands of footballs to schools and children's camps due to the popularity of the sport in the African continent. :tup:

    :india:

    India sets up global aid agency
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2014
  14. rocky.idf

    rocky.idf BANNED BANNED

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    For the last two decades we have resisted efforts to take us out of the LDC list.Being in LDC gives us certain advantages which we should not loose.
     
  15. santosh

    santosh Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    hmmmm, may be, Bangladesh is a 'stronger' country than those more than half of the African countries who couldn't do the same to keep themselves among the LDCs :coffee:

    its just depends who 'qualify' for the benefits as a LDC. have you ever heard India offering foreign Aid to Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, China, Indonesian etc? simply because they don't 'qualify' for being "needy enough" for the same. half of the posts of this thread is concerning India's foreign aid for African countries only :coffee:
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2014
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