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A Toast to the Future P.M of India.

Discussion in 'National Politics' started by RoYaN, Sep 22, 2010.

?

Who is the most capable person to be the Future P.M of India???

  1. Rahul Gandhi(Probable Congress candidate )

    25.0%
  2. Narendra Modi (Most probable BJP candidate )

    61.5%
  3. Mayawati,Jayalalita,Shrarad pawar etc....

    1.9%
  4. Some one one else(please mention who that person is ,if you choose this option)

    11.5%
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  1. RoYaN

    RoYaN Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Thank you.
    The point is he is trying to tell and show the people that he is one among them and willing to work with them to bring them up.
     
  2. True_Indian

    True_Indian 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    I like him because he is not communali polluted,he speaks from the heart and gives honest answers,not power greedy,comparatively young and intracts with youth and commen man,supports young leaders etc.
     
  3. Guynextdoor

    Guynextdoor Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    You are a reader of the Hindu right? What do you think the Hindu (not TOI) tells about him? since that is not propoganda by your books, you can infer there is no smoke without fire.
     
  4. DaRk KnIght

    DaRk KnIght Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Before I write my answer, please elaborate on bolder part. No smoke without fire right...so how come it is propaganda against Rahul but truth against Modi?? What is the criteria by which you can say that this news is propaganda while that news is true??

    Now Regarding "The Hindu" on Modi......

    They dont talk cheap and crap. No inflammatory material in it but just facts and statements made.

    Facts: There was a CBI inquiry and no evidence of him being involved was found.

    Statements: Of other leaders.

    Unlike ToI or Aaj Tak they are not ina habit of declaring a person guilty without having sufficient proofs. More over they are not interested in having cheap publicity and that is the reason why they do not publish crap.

    Consult Civil services Aspirants/CAT/MAT/CLAT for more information on the quality of "The Hindu". :smokin:
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2010
  5. Guynextdoor

    Guynextdoor Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    Very eloquent. And maybe you can also refer to the facts that the Hindu and Frontline, their magazine, were at the forefront of investigative journalism to expose modi's role behind gujarat riots. obviously you won't. Obviously, that doesn't fit with all the myth that you are trying to create about modi. Now it was very convenient to blame TOI, but what about , not just hindu, but also India Today, Outlook, every major newspaper & TV channel (NDTV) worth it's salt?
     
  6. Guynextdoor

    Guynextdoor Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    & what is the greater sin? Partying at an inapproriate time or KILLING THOUSANDS?
     
  7. Guynextdoor

    Guynextdoor Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    I know it's a waste of time because you will get back to your quibbling. But still...a recent frontline (magazine of hindu) report:

    P.S- The standards you expect from your PM can be seen below.


    Cornering Modi

    COMMUNALISM

    Cornering Modi
    LYLA BAVADAM


    The Supreme Court order allowing the SIT to probe Narendra Modi’s role in the post-Godhra riots delivers a blow to the BJP.

    SAM PANTHAKY/AFP

    Chief Minister Narendra Modi in Gandhinagar on August 2.

    After seven year of arrogant confidenc, the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party in Gujarat is now nervously looking over its shoulder. Chief Minister Narendra Modi seems a little wary after the Supreme Court gave the green signal to the Special Investigation Team (SIT) to question him and a few others regarding the 2002 post-Godhra riots.

    On April 27, the Supreme Court ordered the SIT “to take steps as required in law†to probe a complaint that Modi, his Cabinet colleagues, senior police officials and bureaucrats had orchestrated the post-Godhra communal riots. The order was in response to a petition filed by Zakia Jaffrey and the Citizens for Justice and Peace. Zakia Jaffrey was seeking justice for her husband and former Congress Member of Parliament Ehsan Jaffrey and 39 others who were killed in Ahmedabad’s Gulberg Housing Society during the riots. The complaint also alleged that those who deposed before the Justice Nanavati Commission that was inquiring into the riots had been encouraged to give false evidence by Modi and other senior officials.

    Zakia Jaffrey had initially sent the complaint to the then Gujarat Director-General of Police, but he did not register a first information report (FIR). Zakia Jaffrey then approached the Gujarat High Court, but it dismissed her petition saying there was insufficient evidence to back her allegations. The Supreme Court gave its order to the SIT in April to probe her complaint.

    Kalu Maliwad, a former BJP MLA who had been acquitted in one of the riot cases but remains an accused in Zakia Jaffrey’s complaint, objected to the SIT’s right to question Modi and demanded a stay on the proceedings. Maliwad said the Supreme Court had asked the SIT to “look into†the complaint only and this did not constitute an investigation. He also demanded disclosure of the SIT’s confidential report on the riots, which was submitted to the Supreme Court as part of the ongoing investigations.

    However, Justice D.H. Waghela of the Gujarat High Court dismissed Maliwad’s petition, calling it “ill-founded and misconceivedâ€. He said: “It is clear from the reading of the apex court order that it contains a direction for (the) SIT and it will take any step required so as to give its report to the apex court.†The SIT, led by former Central Bureau of Investigation Director R.K. Raghavan, has time until December 31 to complete its investigation into Zakia Jaffrey’s complaint and an additional probe into nine other sensitive riot cases.

    Charred bodies in the Sabarmati Express at Godhra station, on February 27, 2002. The autopsies of the victims were carried out in a rushed manner in the railway yard and not in a government hospital.

    Coming as it does seven years after the riots, there are fears that the SIT’s work will be hampered by factors such as loss of physical evidence, having to rely on evidence that is possibly tampered with, and fearful witnesses. On this, an informed source said: “The SIT has been scrupulously honest in its tasks. It has not and will not arm-twist witnesses into saying something that they do not want to. At the same time, it will give maximum protection to them to say what they want to, without fear or favour. This is the distinctive feature of the SIT’s work. It lays a huge emphasis on witness protection as per the apex court’s directive.â€

    Confident of the powers of the SIT, the source said: “The greatest asset for the SIT is the authority it derives from the Supreme Court. It has all the powers conferred on an investigating agency by the Criminal Procedure Code.… [The team] is highly skilled, motivated, tightly supervised and has excellent legal support from K.G. Menon, an eminent, unbiased criminal lawyer from Mumbai.†The source also said that “if required, [the team] will be further strengthened with inductions from outsideâ€.

    Legal experts say there is adequate material for the SIT to proceed with. There are many unanswered questions that, if pursued, may corner the architects of the riots. Why, for instance, were the autopsies of the victims who died in the Sabarmati Express coaches carried out in such a rushed manner? The post-mortem should have been conducted in a government hospital and not, as they were, in the railway yard. Why were the bodies handed over to Jaideep Patel, a Vishwa Hindu Parishad (VHP) leader? Jaideep Patel brought the bodies to Ahmedabad and paraded them in the streets after draping them in saffron. Why was he allowed to move the bodies to Ahmedabad and why did the police not stop him from this grisly procession? Why were police officers who tried to quell the riots transferred? Why were newspapers that spewed communal venom not gagged? These and many other questions await answers and should result in the prosecution of the guilty.
    Describing the process ahead in general terms, the source said: “The first step is to collect all the evidence in support of the allegations. Then, move on to obtain all that contradicts them. Finally, the investigators will be required to sift all the evidence to come to an honest conclusion. In all this, extreme integrity and high powers of logic are required.â€

    While the green signal to the SIT was viewed as part of a slow-grinding legal process, the arrests of Jaideep Patel and BJP MLA Mayaben Kodnani made the public realise that the SIT meant business. Until then, there was a casual attitude to any investigation into the riots. “The Nanavati Commission had given a clean chit to the Ministers and the officials, so the general perception was that the victims would have to forget for good all that had happened. With the SIT in action now, it is going to be different because Modi will be under the scanner,†said Achyut Yagnik of the Centre for Social Knowledge and Action. And, as an informed source pointed out, “a Commission of Inquiry does not have all the facilities of an investigation agency such as the SIT. It can at best record evidence, whereas the SIT can do searches, and so on.â€

    When Mayaben Kodnani was arrested, she was Minister of State for Women and Child Welfare. She had to resign when her anticipatory bail was cancelled by the High Court. She and Jaideep Patel were arrested by the SIT on March 27 under Sections 302, 120B and 149 of the IPC in connection with the killing of 11 people at Naroda Gaam on February 28, 2002. Mayaben Kodnani is also an accused in the Naroda Patiya massacre in which 96 people were killed. The dramatic impact of the arrest and imprisonment of a Minister and a prominent VHP leader was not lost either on the party or on the public.
    From being a party that had a mocking do-your-best-we-don’t-care attitude to the riot survivors, the Gujarat unit of the BJP has been brought down several notches. And while Modi is clearly still the leader, he has taken several hits this year. His political miscalculations cost the party the Rajkot parliamentary seat, which it had held for two decades. The latest has been the defeat in the Junagadh civic elections in July. After the Lok Sabha elections in which the BJP did not fare as well as it had hoped, Modi attempted to reach out to Muslims, whom he had been systematically alienating until then. He fielded five Muslim candidates in order to win over the large Muslim population in Junagadh, but they were all rejected by the electorate. Both Hindu and Muslim voters saw the move for what it was and in the end it was the Congress that won in Junagadh.
    Commenting on Modi’s strategy, Mona G. Mehta, who is researching democracy and identity politics in Gujarat as part of her doctoral studies in political science at the University of Chicago, says: “It is interesting that Modi felt the need to field so many Muslim candidates in Junagadh. His strategy did not work because his traditional Hindutva voters went against him, while Muslims had no reason to trust him. More importantly, Modi’s attempt to woo Muslims in Junagadh reveals his anxieties about his increasingly uncertain political future.â€

    But while all this shows a slip in Modi’s fortunes, it is certainly not his downfall because the majority of the electorate still sees him as a charismatic leader. Mona Mehta says the party will suffer “owing to the lack of internal democracy and Modi’s tendency to centralise powerâ€. But this aversion to developing a second level of leadership is in a way paying off. With no other leader, the State BJP has no alternative but to support Modi.

    Strong anti-minority feelings still run deep in Gujarat.
    Whether or not these will affect the cooperation that the SIT requires for its investigations remains to be seen.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2010
  8. Guynextdoor

    Guynextdoor Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    Modi: Your 'development minister'- all hogwash...again, the hindu...


    BOOKS

    Gujarat laid bare


    LAWRENCE SURENDRA


    A critical study of development and displacement in Gujarat.


    When Bharatiya Janata Party president Nitin Gadkari was asked by a television channel to comment on the summons issued to Chief Minister Narendra Modi by the Special Investigation Team looking into the Gujarat riots of 2002, he rose in defence of Modi by saying that the minorities in the State had the highest per capita income compared with any other region in the world. Cynics would probably say that the per capita income was bound to rise further if the populations of the minority communities were reduced through periodic pogroms.

    Gujarat has been in the news, one could say, for all the wrong reasons. The genocidal events of 2002, which is perceived to have been masterminded by Modi himself, have badly scarred the State’s image. However, Modi and his cheerleaders, including some industry captains, have claimed that Gujarat under his watch has become the foremost “developmentalist State” in the country. Much of Modi’s claims to glory are also intended to bury his absolute disregard for the due process of law and the basic principles enshrined in the Constitution.

    For the sake of Gujarat’s development and that of the country, it is necessary to take a closer look at the State to ascertain whether the claims about high rates of growth are borne by facts. A look further back in time rather than the period of Modi’s chief ministership is necessary in order to place the State in the larger context of India’s development objectives.
    First of all, in 1980, exactly 20 years after its creation and long before the Modi dispensation came on the scene and the Tata-Ambani-Mittal industrial hype involving Gujarat began, Gujarat was among the three fastest-growing States. Since then it has more or less occupied that position. Apart from its long history of mercantilism, Gujarat, like Punjab, is one of the few States with a long history of migration to foreign countries. The remittances from abroad further fuelled trade and mercantilism and resulted in rural prosperity to some degree.
    On the other hand, it is also a part of Gujarat’s reality that the bulk of the State’s people, 77 per cent of whom constitute Other Backward Classes, Dalits and Adivasis, live in severe conditions of the impoverishment and marginalisation. The conditions of the latter two groups are particularly bad. At the same time, communal riots, which have broken out periodically since 1969, have often served the purpose of consolidating the OBCs on the one hand and oppressing the Dalits, the deprived Muslim minority and the poor Parsi landowners on the other.
    Communal riots were among the strategies of the rising industrial capital in Gujarat over the decades. Behind the facade of the high economic growth, there are other, more critical, development indices that show the real story of “development and growth” in Gujarat.

    The dancer and activist Mallika Sarabhai, in a recent open letter to the actor Amitabh Bachchan, who accepted Modi’s invitation to be the brand ambassador for Gujarat, asks, “Did you know that our poor are getting poorer? That while the all-India reduction in poverty between ’93 and 2005 is 8.5 per cent, in Gujarat it is a mere 2.8 per cent? That we have entire farmer families committing suicide, not just the male head of the household?”

    She goes on to state: “With our CM, hailed as the CEO of Gujarat, we have once again achieved number one status – in indebtedness. In 2001, the State debt was Rs.14,000 crore. This was before the State became a multinational company. Today it stands at Rs.1,05,000 crore. And to service this debt, we pay a whopping Rs.7,000 crore a year. Meanwhile, our spending on education is down, no new public hospitals for the poor are being built, fishermen are going abegging as the seas turn turgid with effluents, more mothers die at [child] birth per thousand than in the rest of India…. One rape a day, 17 cases of violence against women, and, over the last 10 years, 8,802 suicides and 18,152 ‘accidental’ deaths of women are officially reported.”

    In order to unravel the nature of development and to know how economic growth takes place and who it benefits, researchers have to remove painstakingly the layers of propaganda and lay bare the facts and figures. Creative approaches are needed to dig out the facts and analyse the data. Lancy Lobo and Shashikant Kumar have done just that in Land Acquisition, Displacement and Resettlement in Gujarat – a rigorous work which is not only rich in quality but is a minefield of ideas in terms of methodology, empirical research and the tools used.

    The ostensible purpose of all development and economic growth in a developing economy is claimed to be the removal of poverty, employment creation, and income generation, and not just generation and accumulation of wealth by a small percentage of the population. If that is the case, why is it that development causes such large-scale displacement and impoverishment of people?
    The authors, in this published study, originally titled “Development induced displacement”, have logically chosen the process of land acquisition, displacement and resettlement to study the process of development in Gujarat in great detail.

    Referring to development-induced displacement, the social scientist Dr Ghanshyam Shah, in his ‘foreword’ to the book, says, “We do not have precise authenticated information…regarding land acquired and families displaced under various development projects. Such a state of affairs continues to exist despite the hyper ‘knowledge world’ having sophisticated fourth-generation advanced information technology, statistical and managerial skills, and numerous surveys for future planning. This speaks of a casual and callous mindset of policymakers, planners and private investors towards those who are displaced.”

    The Special Economic Zones (SEZs) and the damage they are causing to local communities and livelihoods form part of this mindset. It is in the face of such “forced development” in the name of SEZs that works such as the one under review are important models for similar studies to be undertaken across the country.

    The work of Lancy Lobo and Shashikant Kumar covers almost 60 years and since no secondary data were available within any of the government departments of Gujarat, they laboriously scanned 80,000 gazette notifications and coded and recoded the information in order to maintain uniformity in presenting the measurements of land in their study. In doing so, the authors created a database of revenue land, region-wise and decade-wise. They state that “40 per cent of the 18,638 villages of Gujarat are affected” and that “Special Economic Zones will aggravate the problem”.

    The SEZs, particularly in the case of Gujarat, the authors point out, are acquiring more land than they require. Comparing the 15 million persons displaced during the traumatic Partition days of 1947 with the 60 million displaced after 1947, they conclude that awareness on the subject of displacement is weak, possibly because those displaced are the poorest of the poor and mostly tribal people or Adivasis.

    Detailed approach

    The authors provide a detailed approach to the study and the methodology used, which is unique in terms of land-related field studies and should serve as a useful model for similar detailed studies that will be required in other States. The work analyses not only the displacement in terms of different types of projects but also the trends in land acquisition and the families affected. The authors look at the consequences and the impact of these on the people and conclude the study by addressing a series of important policy issues.

    Here are some samples. Gujarat’s sex ratio continuously declined from 942 in 1981 to 934 in 1991 to 921 in 2001. More interestingly or rather tragically, in the 0-6 age group the sex ratio declined steeply, reaching a ratio of 600 females to 1,000 males. Even more significant is the fact that the decline accelerated during the liberalisation decade – 1991-2001.

    In agriculture, Gujarat’s production of cereals and other foodgrains in the industrialised phase of 1991-2001 declined to nearly half of what it was in 1990. In the past two decades, Gujarat has been losing agricultural land at a faster rate than it did between 1960 and 1980.

    In the context of the Narmada Valley Project and what it is supposed to achieve, it is significant to note, according to the authors, that “even after 60 per cent of Gujarat’s irrigation potential has been utilised, the State claims in its socio-economic report that the output of the agriculture sector in Gujarat has been largely dependent on the south-west monsoon”.

    In her open letter, Mallika Sarabhai says: “In the 49 years since it [the Narmada project] was started, and in spite of the Rs.29,000 crore spent on it, only 29 per cent of the work is complete. That the construction is so poor that over the last nine years there have been 308 breaches, ruining lakhs of farmers whose fields were flooded, ruining the poorest salt farmers whose salt was washed away. Whereas in 1999, some 4,743 of Gujarat’s villages were without drinking water, within two years that figure had gone up to 11,390 villages.”

    Gujarat holds a mirror to the kind of development that is without the corollary of accountability and just governance and shows what kind of nightmares can await the country if the majority of its poor and impoverished citizens are treated as if they are second-class citizens in an apartheid state.

    [B]Lancy Lobo and Shashikant Kumar, through their painstaking effort and deep commitment to the powerless and impoverished people, show us, as Ghanshyam Shah points out, “how the problems caused by development could be tackled in a just way, making the current model of development less painful to the affected”.[/B]
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2010
  9. DaRk KnIght

    DaRk KnIght Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Thanks for the first 2 words :lol:

    Just one question for all your issues. Who is the ultimate authority to decide whether modi is responsible or not?? Investigative Journalism of TV, Newspaper or the judiciary who relied on CBI report?? Now please dont say that CBI was forced to have an favorable report. Congress is in power for last 6 years.

    BTW you very conveniently avoided my question regarding differentiating between two news.

    Moreover your so called Investigative Journalism is nothing but a burden on common people of India who are easily brain washed by these cheap reports purely made to gain publicity. Remember Nithari case?? All TV and print media labelled surendra as guilty. That poor fellow was beaten by Advocates and general public in the court(Shame on legal fraternity ). But after having CBI inquiry court didnt find anything. So who is responsible for all his pain?? Investigative journalism. Has media accepted its fault?? What happened to their so called Investigative Journalism.

    Do you want some more examples??

    Adnan Pannawala case?? Poor kid was murdered because the so called Investigative Journalism created fear in the minds of kidnappers which was not at all required and that case could be easily solved.

    Want more??
    Mumbai case. Now dont expect me to explain this as well. Moreover none of your Investigative Journalism tried to highlighted the contribution made by TATA after the attack. Do find it and if you are unable to find then tell me I will mail you an article.

    Our media is only interested in getting TRP through negative publicity.

    The so called TV channels and Newspapers(except The Hindu) are nothing but a shame on India freedom of press.

    With so many references dont expect me(The Hindu Reader) to even discuss about these cheap media which is doing nothing good for the country.(Although I did).

    I have my faith in Indian judiciary which is the ultimate authority and not in some Investigative journalism.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2010
  10. DaRk KnIght

    DaRk KnIght Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    wow in just 1 day the figure of 700 raised to 1000's :lol:

    Now who is a greater sinner. One who is not proved guilty or the one who is partying at the death of 200 people??
     
  11. Guynextdoor

    Guynextdoor Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    Ya, I knew you'd react with all kinds of quibbling and vague statements. In the meanwhile, no word on the two investigative pieces of the Hindu (the only proper paper) that I had put in. Where there is no real defence, one can try to quibble.
     
  12. DaRk KnIght

    DaRk KnIght Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Instead of believing in some crap media report, you should Rely on the Sacchar Committee report which made a through study on the condition of Muslims in India. Although the conditions of Muslims is bad in country but it is way better in Gujarat. Please note that Justice Rajendra Sacchar was a former judge of Supreme Court of India and not some guy interested in Investigative Journalism.

    Few Highlights.....

    1.Gender ratio (females per 1000 males): 13th (for all age group), 21st (for age group 0-6).
    937 gender ratio for Muslims is much better than 920 for the whole population of Gujarat and slightly better for all India Muslim average of 936 but rank much lower than almost half the state.

    2. Literacy level: 5th(overall).
    Gujarati Muslims literacy level (73.5%) is slightly better than the state average of 72.8% and much better than national average of 59.1% for all Muslims. [Appendix Table 4.1, 4.1a, 4.1b: Census 2001]

    3. Mean years of schooling: 6th (overall), 5th (male), 7th (female).
    At 4.29 mean years of schooling, it is about a year higher than national average for Muslims but lower than Gujarat average of 4.57 years. [Appendix Table 4.2: 2001 Census]

    4. Proportion of children aged 6-14 years enrolled: 14th.
    Gujarat is doing very poorly in this department, in fact it is worst than West Bengal for proportion of children aged 6-14 years and enrolled in schools. Only 78.9% of Gujarati Muslim children are enrolled, figures for all Gujarati children is 84.8%. If this trend continues coming years will show Gujarati Muslims further lag behind in education.[Appendix Table 4.3: NSSO 61st Round Schedule 10, 2004-2005]

    5. Completed education: 4th (completed primary education), 6th (middle school), 7th (matric)
    As Muslim students move through the education system, their share among the educated drop drastically from being fourth among all Indian states after the Primary level (74.9% have completed at least primary education) to sixth for Middle level (45.3%) to poor seventh (26.1%). These numbers are more than national average for Muslims (60.9%, 40.5%, and 23.9% respectively) but the difference gets narrower higher up the education level. [Appendix Tables 4. 6, 4.7, & 4.8]

    6. Workers Population Ratio: 4th (all)
    At 61.1% Gujarati Muslims rate is better than national average of 54.9 for all Muslims. Considering that Himachal Pradesh, Punjab, and Haryana (which have smaller population of Muslims) are the only states with better ratio than Gujarat, this data is significant. [Appendix Table 5.5] Of all Gujarati Muslim workers, 53.7% are self-employed, 22.7 is trade, and 13.3% in manufacturing.

    7. Poverty incidence: 7th (urban)
    Poverty incidence is 34 for Muslims of Gujarat residing in urban areas, which is better than many states but almost double the state average of 18. [Appendix Table 8.5].


    and many more.
     
  13. DaRk KnIght

    DaRk KnIght Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    wow the statements showing the reality of crap media is vague?? :lol:

    Just tell me which part is vague. I will debate separately on that point. :smokin:
     
  14. DaRk KnIght

    DaRk KnIght Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Even I know its a waste of time when one want to debate on ToI articles rather than Judicial decisions :lol: as if ToI is more authoritative than Indian Judicial System.

    From your very own posted article.

    Its probing and not declaring guilty :smokin:

    And please remember that there is a probe on Rajiv Gandhi's role in Bofors case as well but that doe not make him guilty right?? :wink: or we may give congress leaders some exceptions :wink:
     
  15. Guynextdoor

    Guynextdoor Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    So the Hindu is now crap media? Were'nt you waxing eloquent qith praises about it. Here are my favorite parts: the stuff that Hindu thinks is incriminating


    Why, for instance, were the autopsies of the victims who died in the Sabarmati Express coaches carried out in such a rushed manner? The post-mortem should have been conducted in a government hospital and not, as they were, in the railway yard. Why were the bodies handed over to Jaideep Patel, a Vishwa Hindu Parishad (VHP) leader? Jaideep Patel brought the bodies to Ahmedabad and paraded them in the streets after draping them in saffron. Why was he allowed to move the bodies to Ahmedabad and why did the police not stop him from this grisly procession? Why were police officers who tried to quell the riots transferred? Why were newspapers that spewed communal venom not gagged? These and many other questions await answers and should result in the prosecution of the guilty.
     
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