Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

Afghanistan: Updates & Discussions

Discussion in 'International Politics' started by @speaks, Apr 8, 2011.

  1. johngray

    johngray FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 16, 2012
    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    8
    Hi every one i would just like ask one question.
    What is current position in Afghanistan can every citizen of the that country live their own life.
     
  2. johngray

    johngray FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 16, 2012
    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    8
    Hi everyone i request all the people who are posting in this forum please write small post so i will be easy to read to all the people.
     
  3. indiainter

    indiainter REGISTERED

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    1
    Re: Afganistan

    hi,

    war does't have end..
    so maintain peace..
     
  4. Star Wars

    Star Wars Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2011
    Messages:
    1,027
    Likes Received:
    304
    more or less.. in most major cities like Kabul ,Kandahar , Herat people are slowly and steadily getting the fruits of a progressive
    society. But things are pretty bad some of the remote villages which are under Taliban influence.

    [​IMG]

    Depends on where you are and where your living...
     
  5. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    2,234
    Likes Received:
    520
    Re: Afganistan

    You Should Read the History book again Specially WW2
     
  6. Virajith

    Virajith Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    1,910
    Likes Received:
    623
    Insurgents attack traffic police headquarters in Kabul:sad:



    Taliban insurgents wearing suicide vests attacked the Kabul traffic police headquarters before dawn on Monday, police said, and eyewitnesses heard numerous explosions and a still-raging gun battle two hours later.

    Police officer Mirza Mohammad said at least one insurgent blew himself up at the entrance to the compound and a number of others wearing suicide vests entered the building. Another police officer said at least three attackers entered the building and two were killed, possibly by detonating their vests. The officer said a gun battle was taking place inside the three-story building.

    “There are still two or three suicide bombers inside the traffic department compound. They are still fighting,” said Mohammad Zahir, the chief of the Kabul police investigation unit. He did not provide any information on casualties. Explosions could be heard inside the building.

    Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid claimed responsibility for the attack in a text message to The Associated Press.

    Gul Rahman, who owns a nearby shop, said he heard at least two explosions when the attack started just before dawn. An Associated Press reporter at the scene said a number of big explosions were heard in and around the building along with heavy gunfire.

    Traffic police headquarters is located on square leading to the Afghan parliament and is next to the Kabul zoo. It is also next to the Afghan border police headquarters. The facility, usually teeming with civilians seeking to get drivers licenses and registrations for vehicles, was nearly empty at the time of the attack.

    It was the second insurgent attack inside Kabul in less than a week.



    The Hindu : News / International : Insurgents attack traffic police headquarters in Kabul
     
  7. Virajith

    Virajith Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    1,910
    Likes Received:
    623
    The great American betrayal


    [​IMG]


    It is well known that of all military operations, retreat is the most difficult and complicated. A victorious march that takes a wrong turn can end in a stalemate, but a retreat gone wrong will most likely turn into a disaster. These are the grim forebodings that come to mind when we think of the forthcoming withdrawal of the American-led military forces from Afghanistan.

    WHISTLING IN THE DARK

    The Obama Administration is putting it out as though the withdrawal is a great achievement, since it will pull it out of the quagmire that it has been stuck in ever since George Bush declared a “global war on terror.” But the reality is shoddier — we are witnessing yet another western retreat from Afghanistan, one that can have baleful consequences for others. No matter what the Americans say or do officially, they are, essentially, whistling in the dark.

    The departure of the Americans and their allies — even though reports suggest that a small force will remain — is a fraught moment for the Afghans, the United States and neighbouring countries. Last month, representatives of India, Russia and China met in Moscow. According to an official in the know, the discussion was businesslike and devoid of the double-speak that often marks the occasion. The subject was Afghanistan. Faced with the withdrawal of the American-led alliance from the country, the three regional powers are scrambling to see how they can stabilise the situation. Each of them has interests there, and none of these really clash.

    But all three have an interest in ensuring that Afghanistan is stable and secure, witnesses economic growth and reconstruction, and is integrated into the regional economy. India and China are interested in ensuring that a war-ravaged Afghanistan does not once again become a place where militants are able to establish training camps freely. Both have important investments — India’s $ 2 billion are spread in development projects to promote Afghan stability, while China’s $ 3 billion could aid in its prosperity. As for Russia, it is the primary security provider to the Central Asian states and has an interest in preventing the return of a situation of civil war.

    It is important that the post-U.S. situation does not degenerate into an India-Pakistan battlefield. The responsibility here lies heavier with New Delhi, since Pakistan can be trusted to follow its baser instincts. Indeed, New Delhi’s strategy must be to prevent Islamabad from trying to turn the Afghan clock back to the pre-American days. In this, it can fruitfully use the dialogue processes it has established with Russia and China and, separately, the U.S. Interestingly, in the recent India-China-Russia talks, the Chinese pointedly avoided projecting Islamabad’s case and spoke for their own interests, just as the other interlocutors did.

    But for things to work, there is need for both Washington and Islamabad to confront the hard realities. As for the U.S., writing in Foreign Policy, Vali Nasr wrote “America has not won this war on the battlefield, nor has the country ended it at the negotiating table. America is just washing its hands of this war.” According to Mr. Nasr, who worked in Richard Holbrooke’s AfPak team in the U.S. State Department, President Obama’s attitude to the American commitment in Afghanistan has been dictated by domestic politics — when it was popular back home he backed it, and when it became unpopular, he pushed for terminating the U.S. commitment. The American withdrawal, Mr. Nasr argues, is without any concern for the fate of Afghanistan itself, or for the possible chaos that may follow in the region.

    As for Pakistan, the belief among some key players, notably in the Army, that there can once again be “Fateh” (Victory) in Kabul is delusional. Nothing in the ground situation suggests that the writ of the Taliban will run across Afghanistan again, at least not the Taliban that Pakistan so effectively aided and controlled in the 1990s. Indeed, the most unstable part of the country will be the eastern region bordering Pakistan, whose own border with Afghanistan is the site of an insurgency led by the Tehreek-e-Taliban, Pakistan (TTP). If anything, the TTP could be the principal beneficiary of the withdrawal, since it will find it easier to get sanctuary and arms from the Taliban.

    As of now, in the international process, we have the western countries trying to work out a negotiated settlement that will bring elements of the Taliban into the governance of the country, based on the constitution of the Loya Jirga of 2003. This Doha process has been a slow-moving affair with the Taliban delegation in the Qatari capital twiddling its thumbs most of the time. One problem is no one is really clear as to whether they are dealing with the genuine representatives of Mullah Omar. The bigger problem is that both Islamabad and the Taliban are merely hedging in their responses to the West and they are waiting to see how precipitous the American retreat is, and what happens in the run-up to the Afghan elections of 2014.

    Even today, the Taliban’s supreme leader, Mullah Omar, and several of its top leaders live in Pakistan. Though Islamabad says it is supporting the Doha process, there are doubts as to whether or not Pakistan can actually “deliver” the Taliban to the U.S. and its allies. But there can be few doubts about Islamabad’s ability to play the spoiler. This is what countries like the U.S., India, Russia and China need to prevent through coordinated diplomacy. And talking of elections, we have to see just how the election in Pakistan expected in a few months will play out.

    Since 2002, a set of new facts has been created on the ground. Foremost among these have been the presence of an elected Afghan government and, now, a substantial Afghan National Security Force. This will continue to get the support of the international community and the ANSF will also have the ability to control the key parts of the country, as long as it gets external support. On the other hand, the Taliban has suffered considerable attrition and the relations between Pakistan and the Taliban have been conditioned by the emergence of the Tehreek-e-Taliban, Pakistan (TTP) as well as the unhappy experience of the Taliban at the hands of the ISI.

    There is one important, and indeed overriding, consideration in the manner in which we deal with Afghanistan. Both the U.S. and India need to recognise that they have far greater security interests in Pakistan than in benighted Afghanistan. The “victor” of Kabul will inherit a war-torn and ravaged country without the basics of schools, hospitals and transportation systems. But should the Afghan situation catalyse the rise of Islamists in Pakistan, India will be in for trouble. It does not need to be repeated that Pakistan is a country with some industrial capacity, nuclear weapons and a powerful military. Its capacity for mischief would go up by orders of magnitude, were the Islamists gathered by Hafiz Muhammad Saeed in the Difa-e-Pakistan Council to become even more central to the country’s politics.

    AFPAK TO PAKAF

    For this reason, it is important to reverse the appellation AfPak to PakAf, at least mentally. We need to ensure that a “solution” in Afghanistan has a collateral beneficial effect in Pakistan. Or, at least, it should not affect Pakistan negatively. This is not, of course, a call for pandering to Islamabad’s Afghan fantasies.

    The presence of U.S.-led forces has played a stabilising role in Afghanistan. But now they are going and leaving fear in their wake. The Afghans are petrified at the prospect of a renewed civil war and the return of the Taliban, the Pakistanis, or at least the sensible ones, are scared of the threat from the TTP. India, Russia and China are worried about the possible spill-over effects of a civil war in the country. As for the U.S., its fear is that its retreat could, through some missteps, become a rout.


    (The writer is a Distinguished Fellow at the Observer Research Foundation, New Delhi)


    The great American betrayal - The Hindu
     
  8. anupamsurey

    anupamsurey REGISTERED

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Re: Afganistan

    I personally dont think that pakistan has any plan to even fight taliban. to me it seems that they dont even have the will to fight taliban, they may use the taliban as a leverage against india by increasing cross border terrorism. moreever taliban is far to potent against pakistan forces, hell we US forces coudnt eliminate them, there is no question of ill trained pakistan army fighting taliban.
     
  9. Jungibaaz

    Jungibaaz Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 9, 2011
    Messages:
    5,744
    Likes Received:
    2,113
    Re: Afganistan

    There are two types of taliban that have different origins, different goals, different enemies, operate differently and in different regions.
    If you mean the Afghan taliban, then no, we have no plan to involve ourselves in a pointless, unjustified loosing battle in Afghanistan.
    But the TTP will all die, unless they run over to the other side of the durand line or give up their arms.

    We have no intention of using terrorism in Afghanistan as a tool to control Kabul, but we wont engage the Afghan taliban either.
    That would be unjust, unnecessary and stupid.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2013
  10. tariqkhan18

    tariqkhan18 Major Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2010
    Messages:
    2,447
    Likes Received:
    709
    Country Flag:
    India
    Re: Afganistan

    As soon as the USA leaves, Taliban will join hands with Pakistan and focus on Kashmir.

    They have already showed interest.
     
  11. Jungibaaz

    Jungibaaz Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 9, 2011
    Messages:
    5,744
    Likes Received:
    2,113
    Re: Afganistan

    The TTP have vowed to take on India in Kashmir.
    But If we have our way, they'll all be dead or captured/arrested within a a year or two of withdrawal of the US and allies.

    However, support for militancy in J&K likely wont stop for various reasons, not least the fact that Indian sponsored terrorism in Balochistan wont stop soon.
     
  12. Virajith

    Virajith Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    1,910
    Likes Received:
    623
    Mullah Omar can run for presidency: Karzai


    Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai wants the elusive Taliban chief Mullah Omar to run for President in next year’s election so that people could “vote for or against him“.

    Mr. Karzai, in an interview to German daily Sueddeutsche Zeitung published on Tuesday, said his government had sporadic contacts with the Taliban but that there is no negotiation.

    He called on the Taliban to lay down their arms and participate in the political process, the daily said.

    Asked whether Mullah Omar could be a 2014 Presidential candidate, Mr. Karzai was quoted as saying: “He can become a candidate for the presidency and give Afghans the opportunity to vote for or against him.”

    Mr. Karzai’s remarks came in the backdrop of his visit to Qatar on Sunday. Mr. Karzai’s government has agreed that the Taliban can open an office in Qatar if the group breaks all ties with al-Qaida and renounces terrorism.

    Talking about Mr. Karzai’s Qatar trip, the daily quoting sources in his delegation said “there had been no discussions” on the issue of Taliban office.

    Mr. Karzai also complained that his government had been disrespected by the West. “We want this relationship to work better, we want to be treated as allies, not as an object,” he said.


    Mullah Omar can run for presidency: Karzai - The Hindu
     
  13. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2012
    Messages:
    3,754
    Likes Received:
    932
    Helicopter Division has produced the first Cheetal helicopter against an order of three Cheetals for Afghanistan Government. This is the first export order for the Cheetal, which is the re-engined variant (developed as company funded program) of the proven Cheetah helicopter being manufactured by HAL Helicopter Division for over four
    decades.

    The Cheetal helicopter is specially suited for high altitude flying and can operate upto 7 kms altitude and hasa range of 640 kms with an endurance of three and a half hour.It incorporates features of modern cockpit instruments like electrically driven artificial horizon, directional gyro, Flight monitoring system,Cockpit Voice Recorder and Master FlasherWarning System. The ground run of the helicopter was carried out on March 27,2013. Shri. M S Srinath, ED(HC),
    Shri V Sadagopan, GM, Helicopter Division, Shri S.K. Mukherjee, RD (DGQA), Helicopters, and others were present on the occasion.

    Ground Run of First Cheetal for Afghanistan | idrw.org
     
  14. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2012
    Messages:
    3,754
    Likes Received:
    932
    Afghan officials released harrowing new details on Thursday about an attack in a western province where assailants shot everyone in their path, sending terrified people jumping from windows trying to escape the assailants who killed at least 46 civilians and security forces.

    Civilians have frequently been caught up in the fighting between militants and Afghan and U.S.-led combat forces, but the U.N. condemned Wednesday's attack, saying civilians were deliberately targeted at the courthouse and other government offices in Farah province. Two judges, six prosecutors, administration officers and cleaners working at the site were among the dead, the U.N. said.

    Also Thursday, NATO reported that an American F-16 fighter jet had crashed in eastern Afghanistan, killing the U.S. pilot. The U.S.-led military coalition did not release further details about Wednesday's crash.

    "While the cause of the crash is under investigation, initial reporting indicates there was no insurgent activity in the area at the time of the crash," the coalition said in a statement.

    Illustrating other dangers, an airstrike by U.S.-led forces mistakenly killed four policemen and two brothers as their car was being searched at a checkpoint in eastern Afghanistan, an Afghan official said Thursday.

    The strike occurred in the Deh Yak district of Ghazni province, according to district chief Fazel Ahmad Toolwak. He said NATO troops were fighting Taliban militants about 10 kilometers (six miles) away, but those killed in the strike were not involved in that battle.

    A NATO spokesman, U.S. Army Maj. Adam Wojack, said the international military coalition was looking into the report, adding it "takes all allegations of this type seriously."

    According to a recent U.N. report, 2,754 Afghan civilians were killed last year — down 12 percent from 3,131 killed in 2011. But the number killed in the second half of last year rose, suggesting that Afghanistan is likely to face continued violence as the Taliban and other militants fight for control of the country as foreign forces continue their withdrawal.

    The U.N. said the Taliban and other insurgents were responsible for 81 percent of the civilian deaths and injuries last year, while 8 percent were attributed to pro-government forces. The remaining civilian deaths and injuries could not be attributed to either side.

    The number of casualties blamed on U.S. and allied forces decreased by 46 percent, with 316 killed and 271 wounded last year. Most were killed in U.S. and NATO airstrikes, although that number, too, dropped by nearly half last year to 126, including 51 children.

    The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack in Farah, the capital of the province of the same name near the border with Iran.

    The hospital in Farah was so overwhelmed with casualties that helicopters had to ferry some of the wounded to other hospitals in nearby areas.

    Provincial Gov. Akram Akhpelwak said two more people had died from the attack, raising the death toll to 55 — 36 civilians, 10 Afghan security forces and nine attackers. More than 100 people also were wounded, he said.

    One of the province's members of parliament, Humaira Ayobi, said one elderly man was found hiding in a bathroom, afraid to come out.

    "Farah is a city of sadness," she said in a telephone call after attending a funeral for some of the victims. "The stores are closed. There's no traffic in the streets."

    The attack began when two suicide bombers detonated an explosives-laden vehicle near the courthouse, shattering windows and devastating several buildings. Seven others jumped out of the pickup and ran toward the courthouse and attorney general's office, prompting an eight-hour gunbattle that left many buildings pockmarked from bullets and rocket-propelled grenades.

    Ayobi said the attackers went from room to room shooting people, including nearly two dozen people who had taken refuge in a basement. She also said two judges were singled out to be killed in a separate room, and that their bodies were burned.

    The attackers were wearing military-style uniforms easily bought in Afghan markets and had painted a pickup in camouflage to disguise it as an Afghan National Army vehicle so it could bypass checkpoints, she said.

    An Associated Press photo shows a group of soldiers standing over the body of one of the slain attackers who was lying in a pool of blood and wearing a uniform nearly identical to theirs.

    Local officials said Wednesday that they believed the attackers were trying to free 15 Taliban prisoners who were about to stand trial. But Ayobi said the initial target might have been the governor's compound until heavy security there forced the attackers to redirect themselves to the courthouse.

    In New York, the U.N. Security Council condemned the attack "in the strongest terms" and called for the perpetrators, organizers and financiers to be brought to justice. The council reiterated its "serious concern at the threats posed by the Taliban, Al-Qaida and illegal armed groups to the local population, national security forces, international military and international assistance efforts in Afghanistan."

    UN condemns Afghan attack that killed at least 46 | www.springfieldnewssun.com
     
  15. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2012
    Messages:
    3,754
    Likes Received:
    932
    Hundreds of Afghan university students in the eastern city of Jalalabad took to the streets on Monday to protest the building of a Pakistani military gate in what the Afghan defense ministry says is inside Afghanistan.

    The incident is the latest in rising tensions between the two sides, whose attempts to lure the Taliban to the peace table have stalled amid their feuding.

    Pakistani support for the Afghan peace process is considered essential because of the two countries' long, porous border and Islamabad's history of supporting militant groups.

    The protest was sparked by a statement on Sunday by Afghan President Hamid Karzai who ordered his top officials to take immediate action to remove the gate and other "Pakistani military installations near the Durand Line".

    The Durand Line is the 1893 British-mandated border between the two countries. It is recognized by Pakistan, but not by Afghanistan.

    Afghanistan maintains that activity by either side along the Durand Line must be approved by both countries.

    "Establishing a gate by Pakistan on the Durand Line and inside Afghanistan is against all international norms," Afghan defense ministry spokesman, General Zahir Azimi, told a news conference on Monday.

    "We will use all options to remove whatever they have built," he added, without elaborating.

    That came on the same day as university students in the Surkhroad district of Nangarhar province demonstrated against the Pakistani gate.

    Chanting "death to Pakistan", "death to ISI" and "death to (Pakistani President Asif Ali) Zardari", the students marched from Nangarhar university and blocked the main highway between Kabul and Jalalabad for about an hour.

    (Reporting by Mirwais Harooni, Rafiq Shirzad and Hamid Shalizi; Writing by Dylan Welch; Editing by Jeremy Laurence)

    Tensions rise over Afghan, Pakistan border dispute | Reuters
     

Share This Page