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Agni Series Missiles News And Discussions

Discussion in 'Indian Military Doctrine' started by CONNAN, Mar 9, 2011.

  1. kiduva21

    kiduva21 Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Re: India test-fires 4,000km-range nuclearcapable Agni-IV missile

    just curious, What are the main targets can the 8000 km missile can get and 5000 km missile cannot (europ , Isreal,japan,north korea, Australia etc.),
    may be GOI don't want to spread missile threat in these targets
     
  2. safriz

    safriz BANNED BANNED

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    Re: India test-fires 4,000km-range nuclearcapable Agni-IV missile

    I understand INSBut what is micro navigation? Never heard of it.
     
  3. designer2cad

    designer2cad Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Re: India test-fires 4,000km-range nuclearcapable Agni-IV missile

    congrats to drdo
     
  4. Eddie

    Eddie Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    Re: India test-fires 4,000km-range nuclearcapable Agni-IV missile

    For decades, Global Positioning System (GPS)
    technology has been incorporated into vehicles
    and munitions to meet rigid requirements for
    guidance and navigation. As a result, a
    substantial number of DoD systems are
    dependent on GPS data to provide accurate
    position, direction of motion, and time
    information. This dependence creates a critical
    vulnerability for many DoD systems in
    situations where the intended targets are either
    equipped with high-power jammers or the GPS
    signal is compromised.
    The goal of the Micro-Technology for
    Positioning, Navigation and Timing (Micro-PNT)
    program is to develop technology for self-
    contained, chip-scale inertial navigation and
    precision guidance for munitions as well as
    mounted or dismounted soldiers. Size, weight,
    power, and cost (SWaP+C) are key concerns in
    the overall system design of compact
    navigation systems. Breakthroughs in
    microfabrication techniques may allow for the
    development of a single package containing all
    of the necessary devices (clocks,
    accelerometers, and gyroscopes) incorporated
    into a small (8 mm3 ) low-power (1 W) timing
    and inertial measurement unit. On-chip
    calibration should enable periodic internal error
    correction to reduce drift and thereby enable
    more accurate devices. Trending away from
    ultra-low drift sensors towards self-calibrating
    devices will allow revolutionary breakthroughs in
    PNT technology.
    source:
    Micro-Technology for Positioning, Navigation and Timing (Micro-PNT)

    more read: Inertial navigation system - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    INS miniaturised is MNS...
     
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  5. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    Agni-IV Ballistic Missile ready for induction into Indian Army

    The successful testing of the 4000-km range nuclear capable ballistic missile 'Agni-IV' has made the missile ready for induction into the Army.

    "The test firing was a total success. The missile travelled its full range," MVKV Prasad, director of Integrated Test Range, told PTI.

    The third consecutive trial of the missile was conducted at Wheeler Island off Odisha coast at 10.52 am, DRDO said, adding the serial production of the missile would begin now.

    The test fire is the last one in the series of development launches.

    [​IMG]

    Propelled by composite solid fuel rocket motor technology, Agni-IV was launched from its road mobile launcher, which is also indigenously developed by DRDO.

    The long range radars and electro-optical tracking systems which were located all along the coast tracked and monitored all the parameters throughout the flight.

    Two ships located near the target point tracked the vehicle and witnessed the final event, a DRDO release said.

    Defence Minister AK Antony congratulated DRDO chief Avinash Chander and his team on the successful test launch.

    "The missile took off majestically, rose to a height of over 850 km, covered the intended range in about 20 minutes, hit the target with two digit accuracy; meeting all mission objectives and proving the capabilities of the missile," DRDO spokesman Ravi Gupta said.

    Agni-I, II, III and Prithvi are already in the arsenal of the armed forces, giving a reach of over 3000 km and the country an effective deterrence capability, DRDO said.

    "The event is of greater significance since the system was tested in its deliverable configuration with the active participation of Strategic Force Command personnel. The missile is now ready for induction and its serial production will now begin," said Chander, who is also the scientific advisor to the Defence Minister.
     
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  6. Dsmahanta

    Dsmahanta 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Re: Agni-IV Ballistic Missile ready for induction into Indian Army

    Good news buddy
     
  7. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Indian Agni-4 launch stirs fears of local nuclear war in S Asia amid arms race



    India is launching the production of its new nuclear-capable ballistic missile with a range of 4,000 kilometres. Experts have been concerned by assuming that the move actually amounts to a new round of the regional arms race. If the worst comes to the worst, things may result in a local nuclear conflict.

    The ballistic missile in question is Agni-IV, and now that it has been successfully tested three times, the Indian military is prepared to pass it into service. But two years ago, India launched its intercontinental missile Agni-V, with an effective range of 5,000 kilometres. Some experts feel that this is an excessive range for strategic missiles, if these are meant to be used in the standoff with Pakistan. Agni-V, as well as Agni-IV can well hit targets in China. This is what an expert with the Centre for International Security of the Institute of World Economy and International Relations, Peter Topychkanov, says about it in a comment.

    “India is pursuing several goals by developing its nuclear forces. The first one is to counter nuclear threats, such as the neighbouring Pakistan and China. The threats in question have prompted India to create its own nuclear triad. The air component of India’s triad is currently the weakest. So Delhi lays emphasis on ground-based missiles, and eventually, on sea-based nuclear forces”.

    A classical nuclear triad comprises land, sea and air-based weapon systems, with only Russia and the United States currently boasting this kind of triad. Even if any two components of the triad are destroyed, the third one is still capable of delivering a retaliatory strike. Aside from strategic missiles, India has other airborne vehicles to deliver nuclear charges to targets (such as the Mirage-2000 multipurpose jet fighters). India is also due to commission its own first nuclear submarine shortly, a sub that can be armed with ballistic missiles.

    If seen from the outside, India is clearly aspiring to regional domination and is engaged in arms race escalation, although the Indians will, of course, beg to differ. This is what a military expert Victor Baranets has to say in a comment.

    “India has long been trying to take its rightful place in Asia and the Pacific. The country has a number of territorial problems. There are also a number of strategic enemies, above all China. India, besides, has the vast expanse of the ocean where it wants to secure its fully-fledged presence. Nor should one forget about the factor of Pakistan”.

    Some experts feel that the current scale of the regional arms race should leave both the potential allies and potential enemies unperturbed by a regional nation test-firing its nuclear missiles. But the arms race is one of the worst destabilizing geopolitical factors, Peter Topychkanov says and elaborates.

    “Delhi, Islamabad and Beijing all deny any arms race in the region. But all three nations are involved in military-industrial competition. India, Pakistan and China continue feeling threatened by one another. There is no talk of complete parity, but a certain balance is indeed kept. These countries are not prone to aggressive behaviour, but they understand that new technologies will pose new threats. That’s why they start considering the possibility of the first preemptive strike. If military-technological rivalry makes some country feel vulnerable, grave talks on regional arms control may follow”.

    But talks on disarmament are currently facing a doubtful future. Besides, it stands to reason to ask if the doctrine of nuclear deterrence can be projected onto South Asia at all. India and Pakistan are neighbours, and their missiles impact point time makes up 3 to 5 minutes, which is obviously not enough to make appropriate decisions. Hence mistrust between the countries is growing as their military arsenals grow. Pakistani arsenals are known to be inferior to those of India, yet Islamabad is in a position to make Indians feel unhappy, says Peter Topychkanov, and elaborates.

    “Pakistan’s missile programme is based on cruise missiles and tactical nuclear weapons, because no Indian antimissile system will be able to protect its territory, especially the areas in the vicinity of the Indian-Pakistani border, from strikes by cruise missiles and tactical nuclear weapons. Given that Pakistan has limited resources, it is prepared to respond asymmetrically”.

    But the problem is that the nuclear arms race involving India, Pakistan and China may under certain circumstances degenerate into a local nuclear conflict. But even a limited missile exchange in the densely-populated region will kill several million people in the first few seconds of the attack, and several hundred million more in the first two or three days after it. A total of 10 million to 20 million people will die every month of radioactive contamination, starvation and other factors of a global ecological and humanitarian disaster. The scale of disasters should sober the countries that dream about further boosting their military superiority at a time when the weapon systems currently at their disposal ensure the achievement of their strategic objectives.

    More Info
     
  8. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    thanks for you valuable opinion :dude:
     
  9. Himanshu Pandey

    Himanshu Pandey Don't get mad, get even. STAR MEMBER

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    another so claimed expert on South asia... they should stop worrying for us... people are more intelligent here then deciding to use nuclear material in bullets against Iraq and using other nuclear material in Vietnam.
     
  10. shah86

    shah86 FULL MEMBER

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    INDIA SET TO ATTAIN N-TRIAD CAPABILITY WITHIN A MONTH

    India is expected to attain effective nuclear triad capability within a month when the indigenously-developed nuclear-capable submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) is test-fired from India¡¯s indigenous nuclear-powered submarine INS Arihant, top defence sources said on Tuesday.
    The nuclear triad refers to the capability to launch nuclear weapons from land, air and sea. India currently has the ability to launch nuclear weapons from land and air. The harbour acceptance trials of INS Arihant are nearing completion and sea trials will start in a month. That¡¯s when the SLBM is expected to be test-fired from the Arihant. But India is expected to officially declare it has nuclear triad capability when the INS Arihant is operationalised in the Navy in a few months.
    India has so far been conducting tests of a 700-km-range SLBM from underwater pontoons and the SLBM will eventually be fitted onto the Arihant. An SLBM fitted onto the INS Arihant will give the country a ¡°credible second-(nuclear) strike capability¡± from the sea. This will be critical if a surprise nuclear attack on India wipes out strategically-located land-based weapons and communication systems. India will then be able to retaliate by launching a nuclear-tipped SLBM missile from the 110-metre-long, 6,000-tonne INS Arihant, which is a ship submersible ballistic nuclear (SSBN) submarine.
    In fact, the Navy¡¯s Republic Day tableau this year will showcase a model of a submarine with an SLBM. It may be recalled that in August last year the nuclear reactor on board the INS Arihant was activated and ¡°attained criticality¡±.
    Meanwhile, the contract for the salvaging of the gutted and sunk submarine INS Sindhurakshak, which was destroyed due to multiple explosions at the Mumbai naval harbour last year, is expected to be inked soon. Once it is inked, the selected vendor is expected to take about 45 days to move the heavy equipment to the salvaging site and it is expected to take three months thereafter to salvage the submarine. So, the process could take about five months. With the delay in the induction of the six French-origin conventional Scorpene submarines currently being built at Mazgaon dockyard, the Indian Navy urgently needs more submarines. The Navy is planning to carry out upgrades on six of its existing conventional submarines. The Navy is also hopeful that the request for proposal ¡ª for acquisition of six second-line submarines with air independent propulsion (AIP) technology ¡ª will be issued soon.
    AIP technology will enable submarines to stay in the depths of the ocean continuously for a longer timet.

    India set to attain N-triad capability within a month | idrw.org
     
  11. kaku

    kaku BANNED BANNED

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    There is any report of Arihant-2.
     
  12. shah86

    shah86 FULL MEMBER

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    ins aridhaman 2nd ATV of arihant class submarines keel laid in 2013(est.) ship builder center vishakapatnam.
     
  13. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    User Trial of Agni-I in February

    Indian Army is preparing to conduct a fresh user trial of Agni-I missile from a defence base off the Odisha coast. The personnel of Strategic Forces Command (SFC) will carry out the test early next month.

    Agni-I is the first missile in the country’s most ambitious Agni series. The nuke-capable missile can destroy targets nearly 700 km away.

    Sources at the integrated test range (ITR) in Chandipur here said preparation for the test has already begun at Wheeler Island launching complex off the Dhamara coast. Missile equipment, motor and all other accessories have arrived and work is on to keep the launcher ready and integrate the weapon.

    “There were considerable improvements in its re-entry technology and manoeuvrability since Agni’s first trial. This test will reconfirm the technical parameters set for the user (Army),” said a defence scientist associated with the programme.

    As the missile has already been inducted in the Indian Army, this will be a limited stock production (LSP) test of Agni-I, which will be randomly selected from a bunch of missiles and used for trial. The Agni-I is an antiquated short-range and surface based ballistic missile in the Agni series.

    Compared to its longer-range cousins, its height is just 15 metres and it is powered by both solid and liquid propellants, which impart it a speed of 2.5 km per second.

    This missile was first test-fired on January 25, 2002 and since then several trials have been conducted.

    It is designed to bridge the gap between indigenously built short-range Prithvi, already deployed in the Army, and medium range Agni-II that has a range of more than 2,000 km, sources said.

    According to defence sources, Agni-I can be blasted off from both road and rail mobile launchers.

    The missile weighs around 12 tonnes and can carry both conventional and nuclear payload of about 1000 kg. Weighing less but having the same thrust, the missile has added acceleration.

    The DRDO had launched the Agni project in 1983 as part of the country’s Integrated Guided Missile Development Programme and the first test flight of the Agni series was conducted on May 22, 1989 when the 2000-km range Agni-II was used for the test.

    More Info
     
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  14. Zeus_@21

    Zeus_@21 Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Agni-5 missile to be operational in two years

    [​IMG]

    Defence Research and Development Organization will test the "canisterised" version of Agni-5 intercontinental ballistic missile later this year, with user trials by the armed forces scheduled for the end of the next year.

    DRDO’s Director General, Missiles and Strategic Systems, Dr VG Sekaran told The Tribune during his visit here that three more developmental phase trials of the Agni-5 are required to validate the design configuration and new technologies, before user trials commence by the end of 2015. User trials, he said, are as good as handing over the missile system for induction, implying that Agni-5, India’s longest range nuclear armed missile that has hit targets 5,000 kms away, could be operational in about two years’ time.

    Agni-5 would be road or rail mobile and will be stored in and launched from a hermetically sealed canister made of special steel that preserves the missile for several years.
     
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  15. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    Night User Trial of Agni-I to be Conducted on Tuesday

    India is heading for a historic day on Tuesday when user trial of an Agni series missile by the armed forces during night will be conducted. Though in 2009, an attempt was made to fire Agni-II in the evening, it had ended in a failure as the missile could not meet the mission parameters.

    With logistic support from the DRDO, the Strategic Forces Command (SFC) of the Indian Army is slated to conduct the much awaited evening trial of 700-km plus range surface-to-surface nuclear capable ballistic missile Agni-I from the Wheeler Island off the Odisha coast.

    A reliable source told ‘The Express’ on Sunday that the weapon in its operational configuration would be test-fired between 7 pm and 8 pm on Tuesday..

    [​IMG]

    However, defence officials fear that the downpour triggered by an anti-cyclonic system developed in northwest Bay of Bengal may prove a dampener. The test range has been experiencing rainfall since Saturday night and the forecast has been that rain and thunder shower may occur in next 24 hours.

    “We can fire the missile as per the schedule if we get a dry weather throughout Tuesday. We are ready and the missile has already been integrated. While the range integration has been finished, the tracking systems have been put on place. The mission depends on the favourable weather condition,â€￾ said a defence official.

    On November 23, 2009, the first ever night launching of Agni-II ended in failure as the missile failed to achieve the pre-coordinated mission parameters. The weapon faltered just before the second stage separation and behaved erratically deviating from its coordinated path.

    Defence sources said there were considerable improvements in its re-entry technology and manoeuvrability since Agni-I’s first trial. As the missile has already been inducted in the Army, this test will reconfirm the technical parameters set for the user.

    This will be a limited stock production (LSP) series test of Agni-I, which has been randomly selected from a bunch of missiles in the production lot. The Agni-I is an antiquated short-range and surface based ballistic missile in the Agni series.

    Compared to its longer range cousins, its height is 15 metres and it is powered by both solid and liquid propellants which impart it a speed of 2.5 km per second. The missile weighs around 12 tonnes and can carry both conventional and nuclear payload of about 1000 kg.

    The missile was first test-fired on January 25, 2002 and since then several trials have been conducted. It is designed to bridge the gap between indigenously built short range Prithvi, already deployed in the army, and medium range Agni-II that has a range of more than 2,000 km.
     
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