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Agni Series Missiles News And Discussions

Discussion in 'Indian Military Doctrine' started by CONNAN, Mar 9, 2011.

  1. Marqueur

    Marqueur Peaceful Silence ELITE MEMBER

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    for example ---when we drop a 1MT nuke ... most of the nuclear material is wasted ... almost ~90 % ... whatever u see is just ~10% energy release of nuclear matrial ... a 1MT nuke can give the same effect of Tsar bomb if we improve the efficiency of Fission reaction ... which is very hard to do .. only thing comes near to this is Anti-matter bomb in which 100 % energy release ... but thats altogether diff. topic...

    why waste money on Saturn V or a PSLV when we can use C-17 Globemaster III ...
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2013
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  2. Skull and Bones

    Skull and Bones Doctor Death Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Thread ka title dekh bhai. :fuu:
     
  3. Firemaster

    Firemaster Captain STAR MEMBER

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    Chalo shukar hai ki ap ki neend khul gyi :troll:
    vaise vstolji ne to 6 MiRv pakistan ke liyey kahey the so A-6 pe to kahenge nhi:fuu:
     
  4. AlokIndian

    AlokIndian REGISTERED

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    What is more in Agni-6 than Agni-5.Only 500 km? .We know Agni-5 can go 5,500 km carrying 1.5 ton payload.While Agni-V weighs 50 tonnes and is 17.5 metres long, Agni-VI belongs to the 65-70-tonne class and will be 20 metres long.That means DRDO is adding more than 20 tonnes of weight and 2.5mtr more length to get only 500 km more range.We will call this misslie china killer with only 6,000 km when china has icbms with range near to 12,000 km.So china will mock on us.We need a real icbm.Which can go atleast 10,000km of range.
     
  5. ricky123

    ricky123 Captain FULL MEMBER

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    ur wrong instead china is crying foul they indians are lying about the range .they say agni5 range is easily 9000km but cuz that will include europe so indians dont want to spook the west ...
     
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  6. booo

    booo Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    the scientists said in many interviews after the agni-5 launch that they will focus on making MIRVs next instead of working on the range of the missile, saraswat also said that they will work on multiple war heads, decoys and other techniques to defeat anti ballistic missile sheilds. This hindu article doesnt offer more info than that. about the size, and weight of the missile, IMO its highly unlikely that they will increase the dimentions or the weight because DRDO is targetting the mobile launch platforms like trucks.
     
  7. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    After Agni-V missile's strategic success, India is currently developing another long-range nuclear- capable Agni-VI ballistic missile capable of carrying multiple warheads, local media reported Saturday.

    "Agni-V is major strategic defense weapon. Now we want to make Agni-VI which would be a force multiplier," India's state-owned Defense Research and Development Organisation chief V.K. Saraswat was quoted by 'The Times of India' newspaper as saying in the southern city of Bangalore Friday.

    The missile will allow one weapon system to take out several targets at a time, the report said.

    "It will have force multiplier capability... which would enable us to deliver many payloads at the same time using only one missile. Work is on in this area and designs have been completed. We are now in the hardware realisation phase," the DRDO chief said.

    India had successfully testfired Agni-V ballistic missile, with a strike range of 5,500 kms, in April last year.

    Defence News - India develops Agni-VI nuclear-capable ballistic missile
     
  8. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    In a bid to complete its nuclear triad, India recently successfully test-fired a ballistic missile with a strike range of around 1500 kilometres, from an underwater platform in Bay of Bengal. However, Nirbhay, the first subsonic cruise missile, will be test-fired by the end of February.
    While 2012 was an eventful year for the defence organisation with almost a dozen successful launches of various kinds of missiles, this year also promises to be big with many more plans underway. But, they invite questions as to the validity of India’s “credible minimum deterrence” doctrine for its emerging nuclear force as the Agni-VI, to be developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), joins the Prahaar missile as the new symbols of India’s powerful strategic complex, reports IDSA.

    According to VDRDO chief VK Saraswat “A new under-development long-range missile that will reach targets beyond the Agni-V’s range of 5,500 km is being developed.” Once the Agni-VI is developed, it’ll propel India into the elite club of nations with such a capability, which include the US and Russia.

    “Agni-V is major strategic defence weapon. Now we want to make Agni-VI which would be a force multiplier,” the DRDO chief had said recently.

    The Agni-VI is reported to have a range of 6,000 km, and is being designed as the first Indian ballistic missile to host multiple independently targetable re-entry vehicle (MIRV) warheads. It will hold four to six warheads, and will be India’s largest ballistic missile yet at 20 metres long and weighing 65-70 tonnes. To give a sense of the haste of DRDO missile projects, it is the successor missile to the Agni-V, a 5,000 km range missile first tested only last April.1

    The Agni-VI emerges as a product of poor political management. As new missile projects elevate DRDO prestige and create new budgetary requirements, it has every interest in initiating new missile plans regardless of a related strategic requirement. The Agni-VI was, therefore, already being sketched out by DRDO as soon as the Agni-V was first tested.

    “The Agni-VI and Prahaar both signify unnecessary missile projects, which have been developed in the interests of DRDO technical and bureaucratic ambitions rather than the stated interests of India’s nuclear doctrine, a report publish on IDSA claims.” The Agni-VI extends India’s nuclear missile range past the entire landmass of both of its nuclear rivals, while Prahaar could open the road to a tactical nuclear weapons race with Pakistan

    ?Agni-VI and Prahaar both signify unnecessary missile projects? : IDSA | idrw.org
     
  9. Virajith

    Virajith Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Though prahaar isn't much use
    but agni-6 I think isn't waste as it is a technological demonstrator of MiRv and other upgrades
     
  10. criminally bad

    criminally bad BANNED BANNED

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    are u know original and maximum range of agni-4???i serch on wikipedia but members says than dont trast on wikipedia when they come on numbers.
     
  11. WMD

    WMD Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    range depends upon payload. u increase the payload range decreases and vice versa.
    india still doesn't hav MIRV capability, it will b acquired in the future.
    i hav heard the yield of our standard nuk warhead is 200kt, but i'm not sure abt the weight, may b a professional can answer that.
    if u r talking abt the article on wiki abt agni missile, then the variation in range is probably due to diff. in payload or improvement in tech. such as the chromium coating on the nose.
    but currently we posses only IRBMs with A-3 having the longest range. A-4, A-5 not operational.
     
  12. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    What does American Minuteman III, Russian RT-2UTTKh Topol-M or Chinese Dongfeng-41 Intercontinental ballistic missile have in common?? , they all have the ability to hit targets in excess of more than 10000 km and give there respected countries ability to hit any country in the World , India will be among few elite countries who will soon have this capability when Agni-VI will be ready .

    Agni-VI when compared to other missiles in its class will match in dimensions and weight but still range mentioned is just 6000 km rather then 10-12000 km. Does Indian missile really lack range? Or have terrible engines with higher fuel consumption!!! .
    In public and in media Indian missile ranges mentioned is always effective range rather than Maximum range like mentioned by other countries, for example BrahMos from its first launch carried 290km range tag and it took more than a decade for BrahMos chief to accept that 290km is not the maximum range has told in media but he never went onto mention the real range of the missile.

    Similar mention of 5000 km range on Agni-V was quickly dismissed by Chinese experts and western experts after first successful test flight Agni-V has “under quoted “, and Chinese expert went on and claimed Agni-V should have range of 8000km. so what could be range of Agni VI then ?

    As per media reports Agni VI will be sleeker than the Agni-V and will have capability of carrying at least 10 nuclear warheads which will be capable of targeting multiple targets at the same time. Agni VI will also be India’s first missile with Multiple Independently Targetable Re-entry Vehicle (MIRV) capability, what is also interesting is that Agni-VI will weight almost 10 tonnes more than Agni-V but will have coverage of only 6000 km over Agni V’s Claimed range of 5000 km?

    Agni-VI according to experts will have range of around 10000 to 12000 km which will give India world coverage and capability to hit any country. Under mentioning of missile range must be to keep western media and politicians from ringing alarm bells over Indian missiles development and to avoid political pressure to stop development of missiles, work on Agni-VI begun even when testing and development phase of Agni V is yet to be completed. Agni VI will also lay foundation for development of SLBM based on Agni VI which will be a Game changer for India.

    AGNI VI: EYE ON WORLD | idrw.org
     
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  13. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    [​IMG]
     
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  14. Foxtrot

    Foxtrot Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    The probable weight of A6 will be so much if it is based on the same HTPB based propulsion.......... if DRDO uses HMX based high energy propellants and graphite epoxy body, giving it higher fuel fraction, then the weight might even be less than A5.......
     
  15. CountryFirst

    CountryFirst BANNED BANNED

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    DRDO fires on towards MIRV capability


    Indian Defence News - DRDO fires on towards MIRV capability

    [​IMG]

    New Delhi : India's premier Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) is firing on in several directions with the work on hand involving MIRVs (multiple independently-targetable reentry vehicles) and improvements in missiles, aircraft, tanks and artillery.

    DRDO director general and scientific adviser to the defence minister V.K. Saraswat told India Strategic (..:: India Strategic ::.. Home Page: The authoritative monthly on Defence and Strategic Affairs.) magazine that in terms of missile range, Indian scientists had achieved whatever was assigned by the government (about 5000 km) but the effort was now to develop MIRV capability.

    "The building blocks, from boosters to radars, seekers and sophisticated mission control centres are there," he added.

    Saraswat, who has just been awarded the country's third highest civilian award, the Padma Bhushan, said that DRDO had been able to develop key RF (radio frequency) seeker technologies for missiles in cooperation with Russia, and that in the last missile test, the seeker used was made in India. Digital processing in any case is based on DRDO's own software.

    Without the seekers, a missile would be an aimless vehicle.

    The RF and IR (infra red) seekers are meant for proximity and precision engagement of targets, and both these technologies are required for the anti-ballistic missile (ABM) capability as well as all kinds of missiles. Saraswat did not give details but said that India also was working on seeker technologies with other countries.

    "Today, we are able to design and develop RF seekers, and in about a year or so, we will be independent in this key technology," Saraswat added.

    As for an ABM shield, he said that DRDO had conducted four endo-atmospheric (within the atmosphere) and two exo-atmosphere (outside the atmosphere) missile interception tests and that all six had been successful. "We certainly need more tests but we can say we have been successful in developing this capability."

    The last one, designated Advanced Air Defence (AAD) interceptor missile, and fired on November 23, was in fact a hit-to-kill test.

    So far, DRDO has mostly been working on proximity, near-miss or zero-miss acquisition of targets. With these systems, an ABM missile blows itself up some nine metres from its targets. From now on, the effort will be to develop the hit-to-kill capability by directly impacting hostile targets.

    Saraswat, however, said that India was not working on an ASAT (Anti-Satellite) missile.

    ASAT technology has been developed by the US and China.

    On radars, he disclosed that India had initially worked with the Israelis to acquire technology and skills, but now, DRDO had made-in-India long range radars that can discern between aircraft, missiles and other flying objects. The ABM shield being developed has overlapping radar coverage as one cannot "allow any corridors for a missile to slip in".

    He said that DRDO is a technology developer and essentially, it is up to the industry - public and private - to build systems for the users, that is, the armed forces.

    For instance, after supplying 119 Arjun Mark-I tanks - the order initially was for 124 - DRDO is now developing the Arjun Mark-II and nearly 80 percent of the improvements/changes sought by the Indian Army had already been incorporated. Work on the remaining features is underway and there would be trials this summer to satisfy the user requirements.

    The Arjun Mark-I has already outperformed the T-90, Saraswat said, adding that the Mark-II would have enhanced night fighting capabilities with advanced equipment for the gunner, driver and commander. There will be better rough terrain and amphibious (fording) mobility, better surveillance and firing capability, as well as increased protection.

    An agreement is in place with the army for another lot of 118 - or two regiments - of Arjun Mark II tanks.

    The Mark-II has a better 120 mm gun, capable of firing anti-tank guided missiles (ATGMs). DRDO was examining offers from Israel and Belarusfor the new ATGMs.

    Saraswat said that DRDO was in talks with US aviation major Boeing for a transonic wind tunnel for testing models of supersonic aircraft. If the agreement comes through, it will help in easing the queuing problems in testing various systems.

    The tunnel is being offered as part of offsets for Boeing aircraft that India is buying.

    India has only one wind tunnel, a trisonic one, at the National Aerospace Laboratories (NAL) in Bangalore. Set up by NAL's first director, P. Nilakantan, it was commissioned in 1967 and is among the most-used facility of its kind in the world.

    Saraswat said that DRDO's emphasis is on meeting the immediate and foreseeable requirements of the Indian armed forces.

    "We do though have a DRDO Vision 2050 document though," he added.
     

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