Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

‘Hostile’ aircraft could be shot down in new air zone: Chinese air force general

Discussion in 'China & Asia Pacific' started by layman, Nov 27, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Messages:
    11,024
    Likes Received:
    3,042
    Country Flag:
    United States
    [​IMG]

    A PLA air force general has warned that any foreign aircraft disobeying warnings and deemed to be “hostile†could be shot down in China’s newly-established air defence identification zone (ADIZ), Chinese media reported on Wednesday.

    China’s defence ministry last week announced its first “air defence identification zone†over a vast area of the East China Sea, covering islands that are also claimed by Japan. The act was seen as escalating tensions between two countries and has since triggered protests from Japan and “concerns†from the United States.

    “[The zone] provides communication and air force identification between countries, allowing them to identify whether the opposite side is hostile,†said National Defence University professor and PLA Air Force major general Qiao Liang. “But if the subject intruding into the zone disregarded any warning, our pilots have the right to shoot it down,†Qiao said in an interview aired on the China News Service website on Tuesday.

    Responding to the Japanese government’s protests that the new zone overlaps with theirs, Qiao said: “In reverse, we could also argue their zone is overlapping ours.â€

    However, during the interview Qiao also urged all sides to seek peaceful ways of dealing with issues regarding the ADIZ if possible. “It would be apparently irrational to fight a war over the ADIZ. Territorial disputes like this should be resolved through negotiation,†he said.

    Qiao’s comments were made public shortly before United States early on Wednesday morning announced that two of its giant B-52 bombers had flown over the zone without informing Beijing, an act seen as a challenge to China’s claim of the expanded air defence zone. The Chinese defence ministry on Wednesday said it had tracked and identified the US aircraft flying over the zone.

    Meanwhile, Qiao’s comments elicited mixed reactions from Chinese netizens.

    Many cast doubt over Qiao’s claim that the Chinese military was authorised to shoot down aircraft in the ADIZ.

    “The goal of the ADIZ is to establish early warnings and to contain the situation, not to intercept and shoot down enemy aircraft,†one blogger said.

    Another called into question Qiao’s authority on the issue. “He is barely a major general. His word does not count when it comes down to the decision of whether to start a war.â€

    Others expressed concerns about whether Beijing was willing to play tough according to Qiao’s remarks, saying it would be embarrassing for China if it did not respond as he had claimed to potential provocative acts from the US or Japan.

    “I hope China’s defence ministry would do more than just lodge a protest if US or Japanese aircraft indeed carry out provoking acts,†a commentator said.

    Hu Xijin, editor-in-chief of the Global Times, a newspaper known for its nationalist tone, also chimed in on the subject. “ADIZ is not equivalent to airspace. China could not possibly force the US and Japan to inform all of their flight plans in ADIZ, but neither will Chinese airplanes inform them when they fly through their own air defence identification zones,†he said on the Sina Weibo microblogging platform.

    More than 20 countries around the world have set up air defence identification zones. Japan, widely regarded as China’s arch-rival in Asia, set up its zone in 1969 and it is considerably larger than that of China.

    Qiao has made similar hawkish comments on foreign policy in the past. In 1999, he co-authored an influential book called Unrestricted Warfare in which he explored strategies for how a country like China could defeat a technologically-superior opponent through a variety of means including terrorist attacks. The publication elicited a considerable backlash from western experts who accused him of legitimising terrorism.

    More Info
     
  2. tunguska

    tunguska Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2012
    Messages:
    3,618
    Likes Received:
    1,379
    Ya , I was also waiting for warning from warning issue department. First do it then world will believe in your claim.
     
  3. sangos

    sangos Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2013
    Messages:
    5,137
    Likes Received:
    2,735
    Country Flag:
    India
    Is the picture the general smokin:hang2:
     
  4. omya

    omya Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2013
    Messages:
    7,557
    Likes Received:
    3,828
    Country Flag:
    India
  5. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,378
    Country Flag:
    United States
    US Tests New China Air Defense Zone With B-52s, Biden To Rebuke Beijing; PRC Move Drives Korea, Japan Together

    UPDATED: US Flies B-52 Bombers Through Chinese Zone; VP Biden To Ask Beijing For “Clarity” On Their Intentions

    China escalated tensions with Japan literally sky-high last weekend. After years of shadowboxing at sea around the Senkaku Islands, China’s Ministry of Defense announced a new “Air Defense Identification Zone” with authority to oversee and, implicitly, even intercept aircraft flying over the disputed waters, includes Japanese and American military planes. That raises the ugly prospect of repeating the 2001 collision off Hainan that killed a Chinese fighter pilot, downed a US Navy spyplane, and left 24 Americans in Chinese captivity for 11 days.

    [UPDATED 12:45 pm Tuesday: Reuters just reported America's first challenge to China in this crisis, a flight through the newly declared air defense zone by two US military aircraft that elicited no Chinese response. The Wall Street Journal's Julian Barnes identified them as Air Force B-52 bombers flying out of Guam. That means the US sent two of America's oldest, biggest, least stealthy, and least agile aircraft from a long way away. They should have been easy for Chinese radar to spot and for Chinese fighters to intercept -- but whether the Chinese saw them coming or not, Beijing did nothing.
    “We have conducted operations in the area of the Senkakus,” Defense Department spokesman Col. Steve Warren told Reuters. ”We have continued to follow our normal procedures, which include not filing flight plans, not radioing ahead and not registering our frequencies.” Those are all things that China’s unilaterally proclaimed flight rules forbid.

    Meanwhile, Japan’s government has successfully pressured its two largest commercial airlines not to file flight plans with the Chinese. Taiwan and South Korea, by contrast, have made such filings a requirement. China has promised not to interfere with commercial flights.]

    So China has yet to do anything to exercise its new claim over the islands, which are controlled by Japan but also claimed by China. But instead of bolstering China’s position, just making the claim seems just to have stiffened anti-Chinese sentiment in Japan, the US, and — most counterproductive of all from Beijing’s perspective — South Korea.

    This is just the latest instance where China’s aggressive policy in the West Pacific has helped the United States’ position in the region instead of weakening it, inspired resistance instead of concessions, and undermined Chinese “soft power” diplomacy instead of reinforcing it. ”They’d been so effectively bad-mouthing the Japanese and winning support from the Koreans,” said Phillip Saunders, director of the Center for the Study of Chinese Military Affairs at the National Defense University. ”But it [the air defense zone] unnecessarily antagonizes people other than Japan.”

    [UPDATED 10:00 am Wednesday: Beijing even managed to pick almost the worst possible timing: Vice-President Joe Biden is departing DC the Monday after Thanksgiving to visit China, Japan, and South Korea, giving the US a high-profile opportunity to rebuke Beijing and encourage its allies.

    "The Vice-President is not going to Beijing to deliver a démarche," a senior administration official told reporters Wednesday morning, nor will he be "mediating" the disputes between Korea's Park and Tokyo's Abe. But Biden will encourage dialogue among all three countries to reduce tensions -- and he will press China "to clarify its intentions." (Given the complex closed-door horsetrading that produces Chinese policy, however, it's not certain the Chinese policymakers themselves have much clarity on what their strategic logic is here, if they even have one).

    The official declined to say specifically whether Biden would ask the Chinese to undo the zone instead of just explaining it, but he made clear the vice-president is going to convey American displeasure. "We have real concerns with this move by the Chinese because it raises serious questions about their intentions, it causes friction and uncertainty, it causes a unilateral change to the status quo in a region [which] is already fraught,” he said. “It also allows the vice-president to make the broader point that there is an emerging pattern of behavior” — not just one incident — “that is unsettling to China’s own neighbors.”]

    “This ancient civilization, which has thousands of years of diplomatic experience and gave us Sun Tzu and all his subtlety, has given us some ham-handed diplomacy for the last few years,” one geostrategist told me. “It’s not just the air defense zone, which is needlessly provocative in itself”: It’s a host of greater and lesser provocations, from bumbling its response to the Typhoon Haiyan disaster in the Philippines to building outposts on disputed islets. In this case, Beijing drew the air defense zone so broadly that it infringes not only on Japanese territorial claims but on South Korean ones as well.

    “It basically throws cold water on the South Korea government in its efforts to engage with China,” said Ellen Kim, assistant director of the Korea program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Korean President Park Geun-hye made sure to meet with China’s new leader, Xi Jinping, while pointedly stiff-arming Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. That stance played well with the many South Koreans who resent Abe’s refusal to acknowledge the true brutality of three decades of Japanese occupation. But the Saturday declaration came as a “shock,” Kim told me, “and this certainly affects public opinion about China.”
    MORE US Tests New China Air Defense Zone With B-52s, Biden To Rebuke Beijing; PRC Move Drives Korea, Japan Together « Breaking Defense - Defense industry news, analysis and commentary
     
    4 people like this.
  6. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,745
    Likes Received:
    9,636
    Country Flag:
    India
    [MENTION=268]Averageamerican[/MENTION] [MENTION=9548]lookieloo[/MENTION]

    Congratulations for showing those Chinese their place. I wish we could have a government like yours.
     
    3 people like this.
  7. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2011
    Messages:
    3,887
    Likes Received:
    1,467
    i never thought in my life i was going to say this but

    Thanks man the USAF has cojones, God bless the USAF those Chinese are just bothering Japan i hope the US send more jets and the Chinese remain as they are humilated.
    God protect the US fliers

    Any way i have 30% of my family in the US and i live in Japan

    Thanks
     
    2 people like this.
  8. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,378
    Country Flag:
    United States
    Tell me what does your family really think of the USA and you of Japan, my daughter has been there off an on for a few years, but I never made it.

    The quicker some one stands up to a bully the better it is,, World War II would have never happen but except for the appeasement of Hitler.
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,378
    Country Flag:
    United States
    F-35B Twilight Operations on the USS Wasp - YouTube

    The Reshaping of Pacific Defense: Interview With PacAF Gen. Hawk Carlisle

    We interviewed Gen. Hawk Carlisle, the commander of Pacific Air Forces, at the Air Force Association’s Pacific Forum in Los Angeles, about the challenges facing the U.S. and its allies in shaping a 21st century Pacific defense strategy.

    The general emphasized the central role engaging our allies is playing for the Air Force in the Pacific.

    “The chief (of staff of the Air Force) has underscored that as resources are constrained we need to become closer with our allies. I would add that we need to do this as well for strategic reasons. Our allies in the Pacific are always in the frontline. This means that our task is to have credible forward presence for deterrence working in close coordination with those allies.”

    Both in his presentation as well as during the interview, the general highlighted the importance of practical steps to enhance allied collaboration. He highlighted in the public presentation the growing role of collaboration among the Pacific allies and the importance of that for U.S. policy as well.

    In the interview, he noted that the U.S.-Japanese relationship is undergoing a fundamental transformation. The Japanese are clearly rethinking their defense posture and he argued that the U.S. was working much more deeply and comprehensively with the Japanese defense forces than even two years ago. For example, “We have moved our air defense headquarters to Yokota Air Base and we are doing much closer coordination on air and missile defense with the Japanese to deal with a wider spectrum of regional threats.”

    The Air Force is stepping up its collaborative efforts and capabilities with key regional air forces, including with Australia, Singapore, South Korea and Japan. And Carlisle emphasized that the service is pushing to enhance cross-collaborative capabilities among those allies as well.

    While trying to get the allies to work more closely with each other, the Pacific commander also underscored that the US Air Force is adopting allied innovations.

    “Singapore is doing very innovative things with their F-15s, notably in evolving the capabilities of the aircraft to contribute to maritime defense and security. We are looking very carefully at their innovations and can leverage their approach and thinking as well,” he said. “This will certainly grow as we introduce the fleet of F-35s in the Pacific where cross national collaboration is built in.”

    Forging paths towards cross-domain synergy among joint and coalition forces is a key effort underway.

    The general cited several examples.

    The US Army and Air Force can better integrate their missile defense capabilities, to expand defensive and offensive performance. During his presentation, Carlisle highlighted the example of a rapid deployment of an Army missile defense battery for the defense of a key Air Force airfield, calling this kind of capability central for now and a building block for the future.

    Second, he described the ability of advanced aircraft, in this case the F-22, to provide forward targeting through its sensors for submarine based T-LAMS (cruise missiles) as both a more effective use of the current force and a building block for the emergence of the F-35 fleet in the Pacific.

    Third, the Air Force is learning from the Marines about ways to become more expeditionary. A key example he cited is the “Rapid Raptor deployment.” The idea is to take four Raptors and deploy them with a C-17 and to rotate across the Pacific to go to the point of need for implementing missions. This provided both a tool for enhanced survival and an enhanced capability to apply the force associated with a fifth-generation aircraft as well.

    His focus was upon leveraging Air Force and joint assets in ways that would make that force more expeditionary and more effective in providing for cross-domain synergy. He noted that the combination of a large deck carrier with the Air Force with the Amphibious Ready Group and Marine Expeditionary Unit (ARG-MEU) air assets when conjoined within a distributed strike package provides significantly greater capability than when each is considered on its own.

    He sees this reshaping approach as central to shaping the distributed operations approach emerging as the F-35 fleet is deployed over the decade ahead.

    “The F-35 is the finest sensor-enabled aircraft ever built. The F-35 is orders of magnitude better than the F-22 (which is the greatest air to air fighter ever built) as an electronic warfare enabled sensor-rich aircraft. We already are working synergy between F-22s and fourth generation aircraft to provide greater fidelity of the information shaping air combat operations. With the F-22 and F-35 combination and the folding in of on-orbit information and surveillance systems, we will be able to generate more synergy across the fleet,” the general told us.

    The other advantage of the F-35 is its commonality across the services. “We are already working on greater synergy among the air power services; with the F-35 and deploying common assets in a dispersed fleet, the efforts we are making now for today’s conditions will only lead to more effective capabilities for tomorrow’s crises as well.”

    The general sees the addition of the new Long Range Strike aircraft as informed by the decade ahead in shaping the new approach.

    “The new bomber is really a family of long range strike systems. Taking the approach towards synergy, and accepting your proposition that no platform fights alone, the next-generation bomber really is about making the entire force more lethal and more effective, not simply adding a new platform.”

    He underscored that with the addition of the F-35 to the F-22s already deployed in the Pacific, the kind of transformation he envisaged as the new bomber gets folded in during the decade after next will accelerate.

    “When you bring Raptor and F-35 into the mix you make every one of the platforms better in terms of its performance for the joint force,” he told us. “And referring back to your concept of S Cubed (Stealth, Sensors, and Speed), when you put those two together with long range strike the synergy unleashed by S Cubed will be significantly enhanced as well.”
    Air, Strategy & Policy
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2011
    Messages:
    3,887
    Likes Received:
    1,467
    I totally agree, appease the Chinese now give them a chance now will be like Chamberlain to Hitler.


    My family is currently legal, they are US citizens some have been in the US since since late 1800s and very early 1900s some of them fought in the US armed forces in WWI, WWII and Korea, one of my uncles was stationed in Korea and some cousins in Germany and Japan.

    Japan is a very nice place, Japan is today one of the most civilized nations on earth, i defend Japan because today they are a very peaceful society, most japanese are in their 40s far from the ages of testosterone driven teens or early 20s so most of them are very nice people.


    Is not a perfect society, but is a very urbanized and civilized society with at least in the country side a very very respecful society in terms of how a citizen should behave in society.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2013
    2 people like this.
  11. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,745
    Likes Received:
    9,636
    Country Flag:
    India
    Even I like Japan very much. The people are among the nicest to be with.

    When I was in school I had a Japanese classmate Nobuya. His parents were working at the Japanese
    consulate in Mumbai and they were staying in my city in south India for some months organizing a
    cultural event.

    I still have his phone number and talk occasionally. One of my best friends ever.
     
    1 person likes this.
  12. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,378
    Country Flag:
    United States
    When you have a population ten times as dense in Japan and India as the USA you have to learn to get along better.
     
  13. Zeus_@21

    Zeus_@21 Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2013
    Messages:
    2,885
    Likes Received:
    1,288
    That's something great!! :tup:
     
    1 person likes this.
  14. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2011
    Messages:
    3,887
    Likes Received:
    1,467
    totally true but the US has not so much population density, i think Mexico and the US have almost the same population density, the US is 3 times bigger than Mexico in territory and the US has 3 times more people, but Japan has more population than Mexico and is less than half the size of Mexico in territory and same is China versus the US, china has almost the same territory of the US but 4 times more people
     
  15. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2011
    Messages:
    3,887
    Likes Received:
    1,467
    We are all humans the problems today is there are many empty headed hollow people on the net, specially chinabots who think nationalism is everything, there is a lot of jingoism in the chinabots, they think the island is just a matter of pride.
    i say we are all humans because we should accept we are the same species and we should live in peace with each other
    however most chinabots go with this guy`s mentality


    “[The zone] provides communication and air force identification between countries, allowing them to identify whether the opposite side is hostile,” said National Defence University professor and PLA Air Force major general Qiao Liang. “But if the subject intruding into the zone disregarded any warning, our pilots have the right to shoot it down,” Qiao said in an interview aired on the China News Service website on Tuesday.


    Chinabots are simply brainwashed empty people
     
    1 person likes this.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page