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Aliens/Extraterrestrials : News & Discussions

Discussion in 'Education & Research' started by Gessler, Oct 11, 2013.

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  1. Vyom

    Vyom Captain GEO STRATEGIC ANALYST

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  2. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    sounds a bit too fantastic, well at our currently level of technology
    everything is fantastic and a fantasy :laugh:
     
  3. kaku

    kaku Major Technical Analyst

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    who played the HALO series?
     
  4. neil_diablos

    neil_diablos Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    I have played 1 & 2.
     
  5. neil_diablos

    neil_diablos Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    So it is. Creating something like the Halo is probably hundreds of years away given that we are yet to successfully colonize a planet. Stuff like Time travel, covering interstellar distances through wormholes etc are possible in theory but we are no where near achieving practical success with these as technologies do not exist yet. But everything should be possible eventually.
     
  6. kaku

    kaku Major Technical Analyst

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    Re: Aliens/Extraterrestrials : News & Discussions

    The storyline is just fantastic, and some how can be match from the real world paradoxes.

    We will achieve the Type 2 civ within 1000 yrs, the Type 2 can perform interstellar travel and massive structures in a star system.
     
  7. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    Re: Aliens/Extraterrestrials : News & Discussions

    but can we survive that long ?

    with all these Nukes and all,
    and the world is full of idiots ready to go Gun-ho with them
     
  8. kaku

    kaku Major Technical Analyst

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    Re: Aliens/Extraterrestrials : News & Discussions

    man, you are asking an another paradox, this is one of the main contender to solve fermi paradoxes.
     
  9. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    Re: Aliens/Extraterrestrials : News & Discussions

    well deal with, we cannot Ignore this possibility

    I saw it on Discovery channel a physicist said,
    to reach that stage, the humanity needs to survive itself
    and the next 100 years are crucial for the future of the Humans
     
  10. kaku

    kaku Major Technical Analyst

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    Re: Aliens/Extraterrestrials : News & Discussions

    yeah, very crucial, if we will success in colonize other planet like mars then our chance of survival will be skyrocketed.
     
  11. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    Re: Aliens/Extraterrestrials : News & Discussions

    yes, next 100 years are the key,
    Either Humans will be annihilated
    or
    take the next step for the civilization
     
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  12. Gessler

    Gessler Lt. Colonel Technical Analyst

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    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 12, 2014
  13. sangos

    sangos Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Are We Searching for Aliens in the Wrong Place?


    [​IMG]
    Super-Earths with shallower bodies of water could be more habitable for life than Earth.

    NASA/JPL-Caltech
    Earth may be a nice and cozy place for life as we know it to evolve, but is it really the best place for life to thrive? Probably not, say two researchers. In fact, Earth may be one of the more extreme examples of a “habitable” world where life was lucky to survive.

    ANALYSIS: Why the Hunt for Extraterrestrial Life is Important

    The search for extraterrestrial life is fraught with uncertainly. Faced with a seemingly infinite Universe and an assumption that life beyond our planet is an inevitability, we focus on nooks and crannies that have similar habitable environments to Earth and exoplanets that resemble our world orbiting stars that resemble our sun. But finding these special places feels like we’re looking for a very specific needle in a very big haystack. What if our definition of “habitable” is just not all that, well, habitable?

    “The Earth just scrapes the inner edge of the solar system’s habitable zone — the area in which temperatures allow Earth-like planets to have liquid surface water,” said René Heller of McMaster University, Ontario, Canada. “So from this perspective, Earth is only marginally habitable. That led us to ask: could there be more hospitable environments for life on terrestrial planets?”

    Looking at the history of our planet, it may seem amazing that life was ever able to gain a foothold. Between the asteroid and comet bombardments, intense volcanic activity, frigid ice ages and often poisonous atmospheres, how were the conditions ever ripe for single celled lifeforms to form? Perhaps life was just really lucky to have found its way in such an inhospitable place.

    13 Ways to Hunt Intelligent Aliens

    Heller and colleague John Armstrong of Weber State University think that we may be looking for life in all the wrong places and suggest that we should be looking not for “second-Earths” but a class of planet that is superhabitable.

    In an article published in Astrobiology in January, the researchers describe some of the characteristics a superhabitable planet may have. Some of the features — such as the necessity for a global magnetic field to protect life from ionizing solar wind particles — sound very familiar. But Heller and Armstrong highlight the need for a more efficient global “thermostat” that would avoid damaging ice ages. Also, a more massive planet with shallower oceans may be a more habitable solution.

    In their research, they highlight the nearby star Alpha Centauri B as an ideal candidate that could support a superhabitable world. Slightly smaller than our sun, Alpha Centauri B would be able to incubate hypothetical lifeforms on a superhabitable world for much longer owing to its longer lifespan. "You want to have a host star that can keep a planet in the habitable zone for 7 to 10 billion years," which would allow enough time for life to evolve and ecosystems to flourish, Heller told New Scientist.

    “We propose a shift in focus,” said Heller. “We want to prioritize future searches for inhabited planets. We’re saying ‘Don’t just focus on the most Earth-like planets if you really want to find life.’”

    Top 10 Places To Find Alien Life

    The researchers believe our hunt for extraterrestrial life is too set in its ways and blinkered toward worlds that we consider to be habitable because they resemble Earth. It’s a grand observational bias that may ultimately mean that while looking for second-Earths, we overlook far more habitable planets.

    While discussions like this are valuable, I think they can be counterproductive.

    Although it is very important to have “out of the box” thinking when it comes to the search for extraterrestrial life (whether that life be single-celled organisms hidden deep inside Mars’ crust or highly intelligent alien civilizations), using life as we know it as a template is no bad thing. After all, we are the only lifeforms we know of in the entire Universe, why would we ever consider Earth “barely habitable”?

    How life is sparked remains one of the biggest questions hanging over modern science and the search for extraterrestrial life is an offshoot from that. Perhaps Earth, in its barely habitable state, is actually the perfect environment for life to gain a foothold?

    Lacking evidence to the contrary, seeking out second-Earths probably isn’t such a bad idea.

    Are We Searching for Aliens in the Wrong Place? : Discovery News
     
  14. sangos

    sangos Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Bold Prediction: Intelligent Alien Life Could Be Found by 2040

    [​IMG]
    This exoplanet orbits the star Gliese 667 C, which belongs to a triple system. The six Earth-mass exoplanet circulates around its low-mass host star at a distance equal to only 1/20th of the Earth-Sun distance. The host star is a companion to two other low-mass stars, which are seen here in the distance.
    Credit: ESO



    PALO ALTO, Calif. — The first detection of intelligent extraterrestrial life will likely come within the next quarter-century, a prominent alien hunter predicts.

    By 2040 or so, astronomers will have scanned enough star systems give themselves a great shot of discovering alien-produced electromagnetic signals, said Seth Shostak of the SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Institute in Mountain View, Calif.

    "I think we'll find E.T. within two dozen years using these sorts of experiments," Shostak said here Thursday (Feb. 6) during a talk at the 2014 NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) symposium here at Stanford University. [13 Ways to Hunt Intelligent Alien Life]

    "Instead of looking at a few thousand star systems, which is the tally so far, we will have looked at maybe a million star systems" 24 years from now, Shostak said. "A million might be the right number to find something."

    Do you believe alien life exists elsewhere in the universe?
    Yes - We may not have found them yet, but they're out there.
    No - Aliens are just part of science fiction.
    I'm not sure
    View Results Share This

    Many potentially habitable worlds

    Shostak's optimism is based partly on observations by NASA's planet-hunting Kepler space telescope, which has shown that the Milky Way galaxy likely teems with worlds capable of supporting life as we know it.

    "The bottom line is, like one in five stars has at least one planet where life might spring up," Shostak said. "That's a fantastically large percentage. That means in our galaxy, there's on the order of tens of billions of Earth-like worlds."

    Shostak and his colleagues think at least some of these worlds host intelligent aliens — beings that have developed the capability to send electromagnetic signals out into the cosmos, as human civilization does every second of every day. So they're pointing big radio dishes toward the heavens, hoping to detect something produced by living beings.

    This search started in 1960, when pioneering astronomer Frank Drake scanned two sun-like stars with an 85-foot-wide (26 meters) West Virginia antenna. It has ramped up considerably over the past half-century, as astronomers have taken advantage of significant advances in electronics and digital technology.

    However, getting enough funding to keep scanning the skies is a constant problem. For example, the Allen Telescope Array in northern California — which the SETI Institute uses — was designed to consist of 350 radio dishes, but just 42 have been built to date. And the array had to go into hibernation in April 2011 due to budget shortfalls. (It came back online in December of that year after more funding was found.)

    The funding situation colors any discussion of SETI activities and timelines, Shostak said.

    The 24-year estimate, for example, "depends on continued SETI funding, which is in dire straits right now," he told Space.com after his talk at the NIAC symposium.

    Bold Prediction: Intelligent Alien Life Could Be Found by 2040 | Space.com
     
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  15. sangos

    sangos Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Found! First Earth-Size Planet That Could Support Life


    For the first time, scientists have discovered an Earth-size alien planet in the habitable zone of its host star, an "Earth cousin" that just might have liquid water and the right conditions for life.

    [​IMG]
    This artist illustration shows what it might be like to stand on the surface of the planet Kepler-186f, the first-ever Earth-size planet to be found in the habitable zone of its star.
    Credit: Danielle Futselaar


    The newfound planet, called Kepler-186f, was first spotted by NASA's Kepler space telescope and circles a dim red dwarf star about 490 light-years from Earth. While the host star is dimmer than Earth's sun and the planet is slightly bigger than Earth, the positioning of the alien world coupled with its size suggests that Kepler-186f could have water on its surface, scientists say. You can learn more about the amazing alien planet find in a video produced by Space.com.

    "One of the things we've been looking for is maybe an Earth twin, which is an Earth-size planet in the habitable zone of a sunlike star," Tom Barclay, Kepler scientist and co-author of the new exoplanet research, told Space.com. "This [Kepler-186f] is an Earth-size planet in the habitable zone of a cooler star. So, while it's not an Earth twin, it is perhaps an Earth cousin. It has similar characteristics, but a different parent." [9 Exoplanets That Could Host Alien Life]



    [​IMG]

    This artist illustration shows the planet Kepler-186f, the first Earth-size alien planet discovered in the habitable zone of its star.
    Credit: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-CalTech

    [​IMG]
    The rocky alien planet Kepler 186f is an Earth-size world that could have liquid water on its surface, and possibly even life. It orbits a star 490 light-years away. See the full details of alien planet Kepler-186f in this Space.com infographic.
    Credit: By Karl Tate, Infographics Artist


    Potentially habitable planet

    Scientists think that Kepler-186f — the outermost of five planets found to be orbiting the star Kepler-186 — orbits at a distance of 32.5 million miles (52.4 million kilometers), theoretically within the habitable zone for a red dwarf.

    Earth orbits the sun from an average distance of about 93 million miles (150 million km), but the sun is larger and brighter than the Kepler-186 star, meaning that the sun's habitable zone begins farther out from the star by comparison to Kepler-186.

    "This is the first definitive Earth-sized planet found in the habitable zone around another star," Elisa Quintana, of the SETI Institute and NASA's Ames Research Center and the lead author of a new study detailing the findings, said in a statement.

    Other planets of various sizes have been found in the habitable zones of their stars. However, Kepler-186f is the first alien planet this close to Earth in size found orbiting in that potentially life-supporting area of an extrasolar system, according to exoplanet scientists.

    'An historic discovery'

    "This is an historic discovery of the first truly Earth-size planet found in the habitable zone around its star," Geoff Marcy, an astronomer at the University of California, Berkeley, who is unaffiliated with the research, told Space.com via email. "This is the best case for a habitable planet yet found. The results are absolutely rock-solid. The planet itself may not be, but I'd bet my house on it. In any case, it's a gem."

    The newly discovered planet measures about 1.1 Earth radii, making it slightly larger than Earth, but researchers still think the alien world may be rocky like Earth. Researchers still aren't sure what Kepler-186f's atmosphere is made of, a key element that could help scientists understand if the planet is hospitable to life. [Kepler-186f: Earth-Size World Could Support Oceans, Maybe Life (Infographic)]

    "What we've learned, just over the past few years, is that there is a definite transition which occurs around about 1.5 Earth radii," Quintana said in a statement. "What happens there is that for radii between 1.5 and 2 Earth radii, the planet becomes massive enough that it starts to accumulate a very thick hydrogen and helium atmosphere, so it starts to resemble the gas giants of our solar system rather than anything else that we see as terrestrial."

    [​IMG]
    This diagram shows the position of Kepler-186f in relation to Earth.
    Credit: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-CalTech



    The edge of habitability

    Kepler-186f actually lies at the edge of the Kepler-186 star's habitable zone, meaning that liquid water on the planet's surface could freeze, according to study co-author Stephen Kane of San Francisco State University.

    Because of its position in the outer part of the habitable zone, the planet's larger size could actually help keep its water liquid, Kane said in a statement. Since it is slightly bigger than Earth, Kepler-186f could have a thicker atmosphere, which would insulate the planet and potentially keep its water in liquid form, Kane added.

    "It [Kepler-186f] goes around its star over 130 days, but because its star is a lower mass than our sun, the planet orbits slightly inner of where Mercury orbits in our own solar system," Barclay said. "It's on the cooler edge of the habitable zone. It's still well within it, but it receives less energy than Earth receives. So, if you're on this planet [Kepler-186f], the star would appear dimmer."


    Exoplanet hunting in the future

    Kepler-186f could be too dim for follow-up studies that would probe the planet's atmosphere. NASA's James Webb Space Telescope — Hubble's successor, expected to launch to space in 2018 — is designed to image planets around relatively nearby stars; however, the Kepler-186 system might be too far off for the powerful telescope to investigate, Barclay said.

    Scientists using the Kepler telescope discovered Kepler-186f using the transit method: When the planet moved across the face of its star from the telescope's perspective, Kepler recorded a slight dip in the star's brightness, allowing researchers to learn more about the planet itself. Kepler suffered a major malfunction last year and is no longer working in the same fashion, but scientists are still going through the spacecraft's trove of data searching for new alien worlds.

    "I find it simply awesome that we live in a time when finding potentially habitable planets is common, and the method to find them is standardized," MIT exoplanet hunter and astrophysicist Sara Seager, who is unaffiliated with the research, told Space.com via email.

    The new research was published online today (April 17) in the journal Science.

    Found! First Earth-Size Planet That Could Support Life | Space.com
     
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