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Anti-EU Sentiment Thread

Discussion in 'Europe & Russia' started by BMD, May 21, 2016.

  1. Guynextdoor

    Guynextdoor Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    They'll just put all trade advantages and market access on hold until you pay up. You'll pay the 90B to avoid 290B of punitive damages.
     
  2. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    There isn't even £200bn in total exports to the EU and the fall in the £ undoes WTO tariffs twice over. Meanwhile, the currency and WTO tariffs will hit their £300+bn worth of exports to the UK twice over. 15% on German cars and 32% on French wine, 45% on Italian, Begian, Greek, Spanish and Polish tobacco.. On the vast majority of our goods they're single digit.

    The EU is like that scene on Blazing Saddles, where the guy points a gun at his own head as a threat.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2017
  3. Picdelamirand-oil

    Picdelamirand-oil Lt. Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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  4. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Workers protesting isn't even news in France anymore. It's only news when they actually stop.

     
  5. Guynextdoor

    Guynextdoor Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    UK is a relatively small market for all those products.
     
  6. randomradio

    randomradio Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    2019 will be an interesting time for the EU.
     
  7. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    1/6th of all their exports.
     
  8. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    You mean the Caliphate of Euristan.
     
  9. randomradio

    randomradio Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Nah, the population of Muslims will be even smaller than it is in India.
     
  10. Vergennes

    Vergennes Strategist Staff Member MILITARY STRATEGIST

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  11. Vergennes

    Vergennes Strategist Staff Member MILITARY STRATEGIST

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  12. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/europe-changes-copyright-law-affect-190022733.html

    How Europe’s changes to copyright law will affect America

    [​IMG]
    Jeremy Malcolm
    TechCrunchSeptember 26, 2017


    [​IMG]
    At first blush, you might think this couldn’t possibly affect the way you debate the news of the day online, upload family videos or run your startup.

    Europe is considering changing its copyright law. At first blush, you might think this couldn’t possibly affect the way you debate the news of the day online, upload family videos or run your startup. But popular proposals at the EU would strike at the heart of the internet’s openness and accessibility as a platform by raising new barriers to interactive online services around the world.

    The goal of these copyright changes is to adopt new protections for publishers and artists. But if they are put in place, the burdens they would place on internet platforms would curtail the kind of quick uploading, sharing, commenting and responding that makes the Web so useful. Additionally, we have no reason to believe that these new plans would actually benefit the journalists and artists in whose name the measures are being proposed.

    Take one proposal: a fee payable to news publishers when online platforms such as search engines and news aggregators reproduce even short excerpts of news, typically accompanied by a link to the original article (hence the proposal has been called a “link tax”).

    Although the link tax is intended to address a real problem (declining revenues of news publishers has affected their ability to fund quality journalism), similar laws introduced in Germany and Spain further decreased publishers’ revenue by reducing their traffic from links on third-party websites.

    A second European proposal would create a new obligation for websites that host content uploaded by users to install automatic filters to scan that content for matches with copyright works, as a basis for new revenue-sharing arrangements that they would be forced to enter into with copyright owners.

    Among many problems with this second “upload filtering” proposal, not the least is that it may contravene European law, which explicitly disallows any obligation on internet platforms to conduct general monitoring of what their users do -- which this proposal seems to require. There also are insurmountable problems with entrusting algorithms to distinguish infringing uses of copyright materials from legal ones.

    The exact language of the two proposals is in flux, because they are each the subject of ongoing compromise negotiations between three institutions of the European Union. Those contentious negotiations were due to wrap up next month, but signs point to a likely extension.

    Should these measures pass, it won’t just be European internet platforms that are affected.



    However, should these measures pass, it won’t just be European internet platforms that are affected. Indeed, they are largely aimed at U.S.-based internet companies, which are distrusted and resented in Brussels. (Though it’s worth noting that when the Spanish version of the link tax passed into law, Google responded by shutting down its Google News service in Spain rather than paying the tax.)

    Yet a lot more is at stake than the fate of Google or Facebook. Those companies at least can afford the cost of complying with (or avoiding) Europe’s copyright proposals. Smaller businesses can’t. For example, medium-sized internet platforms pay between $10,000 and $25,000 a month in licensing fees for a common tool that conducts a copyright scan of uploaded audio files, an impost that could wipe out a new startup.

    Also, bad European copyright law has often heralded damaging changes to American copyright legislation. It was Europe that in 1993 first extended the term of copyright protection to 70 years from the death of the author, beating America by five years. European countries were also the first signatories to the most important international treaty on copyright, the Berne Convention, which America only adopted a full century later.

    The same could be happening again, as Europe considers changing its copyright law to adopt new protections for publishers and new burdens on internet platforms -- changes that, if adopted across the Atlantic, could be a prelude to the adoption of similar measures here as well, with harmful consequences.

    In its zeal to advance the interests of copyright owners, Europe should be careful that it does not wreak long-term damage to the internet ecosystem by making it harder for startups and small enterprises to innovate and succeed on either side of the Atlantic.
     
  13. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-41407356?yptr=yahoo

    UK must make 'moral case' for free trade outside EU
    [​IMG]Image copyrightAFP
    The UK has a vital role to play in making the "moral case" for global free trade as it leaves the EU, a trio of cabinet ministers will say.

    Liam Fox, Boris Johnson and Priti Patel will argue open markets are the best vehicle for reducing poverty and aiding prosperity at an event in London.

    Free of the "constraints" of the EU, the UK must be an "agitator" for free trade, the foreign secretary will say.

    Meanwhile an ex-Tory leader has warned the UK must prepare for no Brexit deal.

    Critics say failure to do a Brexit deal could result in new trade barriers but Iain Duncan Smith said the EU must agree to open trade discussions by December or the UK should make arrangements to leave without a deal.

    Accusing the EU of "arrogant behaviour... bordering on the deliberately offensive", he said the UK must "throw resources" at a no deal scenario, arguing the UK's reach in terms of trade was second to none.

    As talks on the terms of the UK's withdrawal from the EU continue in Brussels, European Council president Donald Tusk said on Tuesday that he believed not enough progress has been made to move to the next phase of negotiations, including trade and the UK's future relationship with the bloc.

    Ministers have said discussions on future UK-EU relations should begin as soon as possible and there are "no excuses" for the current logjam to continue after Prime Minister Theresa May gave assurances on financial contributions and the rights of EU citizens in the UK in her Florence speech last week.

    Speaking on Tuesday during a visit to Slovakia, Mr Johnson said "it was time to talk about the future".

    At the launch of a new think tank on Wednesday, Mr Johnson, alongside International Trade Secretary Liam Fox and International Development Secretary Priti Patel, will stress the importance of the UK seizing opportunities to forge independent trading arrangements with growing economies around the world.

    "Free trade is not only the key to economic success, but also serves as a force for peace and progress in every sense, giving millions more people the chance to lift themselves out of poverty," the foreign secretary will say.

    "We must ensure that Global Britain breaks free of the constraints of the EU and becomes the world's leading proselytiser and agitator for free trade."
     
  14. Picdelamirand-oil

    Picdelamirand-oil Lt. Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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  15. Guynextdoor

    Guynextdoor Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    yeah but India and china will replace that so it won't matter. Plus Britain is now growing poorer due to Brexit and won't be able to afford German cars etc.
     

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