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Anti-EU Sentiment Thread

Discussion in 'Europe & Russia' started by BMD, May 21, 2016.

  1. randomradio

    randomradio Colonel Technical Analyst

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  2. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    https://www.defensenews.com/global/...se-spending-fund-could-cripple-italian-firms/

    EU defense spending fund could cripple Italian firms
    By: Tom Kington   20 hours ago
    18710
    [​IMG]
    The NH90, developed in response to NATO requirements for a battlefield helicopter capable of being operating in naval environments, is manufactured by a collaborative company\owned by Leonardo, Airbus Helicopters, and Fokker Aerostructures. (Leonardo)

    ROME – A multi-million euro defense fund launched by the European Union to nurture the continent’s defense industry may cripple Italian firms, a senior official has warned.

    As it seeks to strengthen and integrate Europe’s fragmented defense sector, the EU announced the launch in June of a 500 million euro injection of funds in 2019 and 2020 for the development of new equipment.

    The funding, which would double to one billion euros annually from 2020, would be available for programs involving a minimum of three companies based in a minimum of two EU member states — thus encouraging cross border cooperation and even mergers.



    The aim is to get countries to launch European programs, ending wasteful duplication which has led to member states fielding 17 different battle tanks, as well as 29 different frigates and destroyers according to the EU.

    But Guido Crosetto, the head of Italy’s defense and aerospace industrial association AIAD, has warned that Italian firms could be denied handouts from the EU fund if Brussels favors larger German and French companies, leaving the Italian companies weaker and easy prey for takeovers.

    “The fund foresees a rationalization of the number of products in the EU, and therefore a rationalization of the companies that make up the market,” he told Defense News.

    “Unless there is a huge increase in state funding for Italian firms, they risk disappearing as better funded companies in France and Germany benefit from the fund.”

    Italy’s defense procurement spending stands at 4.69 billion euros this year, a slight drop on the 4.72 billion euros spent last year.

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    Crosetto outlined his concerns to the Italian parliament’s defense commission this week, where he warned that applying for EU funding would require a shake-up in Italy’s defense-related bureaucracy.

    Crosetto’s concerns were echoed by the defense commission of the Italian senate, which issued a report this month listing other problems with the fund.

    The commission said that by requiring a minimum of two partner countries per funded program, bilateral deals would be encouraged — a likely allusion to French-German deals. Better to insist on a minimum of three countries per program, the Senate commission said.

    The commission also quibbled the EU’s plan to give funds to companies which would spend the money within the physical boundaries of the EU.

    The EU states in its planning document that “the infrastructure, facilities, assets and resources used by the beneficiaries and subcontractors in actions funded under the Programme, shall not be located on the territory of non-Member States.”

    Such a measure, the commission argued, would exclude EU companies which have activity outside the EU.

    The suggestion appeared to be related to Italy’s defense giant Leonardo, which has sizable activity in the U.K., a country which is negotiating to leave the European Union.

    Thirdly, the commission took objection to the requirement that beneficiaries shall be undertakings established in the Union, in which Member States and/or nationals of Member States own more than 50% of the undertaking.”

    Such a measure could exclude Leonardo, in which the Italian state’s holding is only 30.2 percent, although it exercises effective control over the company.
     
  3. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  4. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    First Comment:
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2017
  5. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  6. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  7. Vergennes

    Vergennes Strategist Staff Member MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    This 'Lonely' Photo Of UK PM Theresa May Is Going Viral

    Internet users quickly drew parallels between the image and May's isolation, both within the Brexit talks against the 27 other EU nations, and within her own Conservative party, where she is under pressure after losing the party's majority in parliament in June snap elections.

    [​IMG]



    Social media on Friday mocked embattled British Prime Minister Theresa May over a photograph of her sitting alone in a room awaiting EU Brexit talks, calling it a "metaphor" for her isolated position.

    In the viral snap, May is seen alone at a large table decorated with four potted plants, apparently lost in her thoughts.

    She was in fact waiting for European Council President Donald Tusk, with whom she was to hold talks to try to break the deadlock in Brexit negotiations.

    Internet users quickly drew parallels between the image and May's isolation, both within the Brexit talks against the 27 other EU nations, and within her own Conservative party, where she is under pressure after losing the party's majority in parliament in June snap elections.

    "Theresa May sitting alone in an EU summit. The picture looks like a metaphor for how her negotiations are going," wrote one Twitter user.

    "I genuinely thought this was a stock image representing absolute loneliness. But no. It's our Prime Minister in Brussels today," said another tweet.

    "Poor Theresa May", wrote the left-wing Huffington Post.

    "Just when things were looking up for her after getting the 'green light' to begin talks about a future trade deal between the EU and the UK, a photo of her sitting alone at a table in Brussels gets turned into an unfortunate meme."

    EU leaders threw May a lifeline in Brexit talks on Friday, agreeing at a Brussels summit meeting to start preparations for the next stage of negotiations.


    https://www.ndtv.com/world-news/this-lonely-photo-of-uk-pm-theresa-may-is-going-viral-1765203
     
  8. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    The talks aren't with the other 27 members though. They're with some dumb French arsehole who has no negotiating power whatsoever, which is why it's impossible to negotiate, because he isn't in a position to do it. The EU middle men need to step aside and let the 28 adults into the room.
     
  9. randomradio

    randomradio Colonel Technical Analyst

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    The talks ain't going nowhere if your PM is talking to potted plants. :p
     
    Vergennes likes this.
  10. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    She may as well be. Each plant represents an absent representative of an EU nation, with the wall representing Barnier. But come 1st January 2018, if we're still where we are now, things will start being put in place for a reversion to WTO rules come March 2019. And the EU will lose the funding offered for the rest of the current MFF.
     
  11. randomradio

    randomradio Colonel Technical Analyst

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    WTO is a bad idea for Britain. You need at least a Canada style FTA. You will lose out on services, which will have to go through WTO, but you can't afford to transfer manufacturing to WTO, or companies will move out in order to save that 10 or 15% in tariffs. You could lose half a million jobs in less than a year.

    It's too early to say how badly the services sector will be affected. But it could be worse.
     
  12. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    We don't care about services, we want manufacturing jobs to replace the EU export void. The EU exports more to us than we export to them, so the gain is on our side.

    No one cares about London, or Nodnol as it's called on Red Dwarf.
     
  13. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    https://uk.yahoo.com/news/why-ireland-might-leave-eu-165220445.html

    Why Ireland Might Have To Leave The EU Too
    [​IMG]
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    At some point the people of Ireland are going to have to choose between Britain and the EU.
    At some point the people of Ireland are going to have to choose between Britain and the EU. There are plenty of reasons why they might go with Britain. They are geographical, economical and political.

    The 30th of March 2019 marks a unique point in the joint lives of the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. It will be the first time in their history that one has been inside the EU and the other isn't. Before 1st January 1973 they were both outside what was then the European Community, which meant they were free to decide on their own arrangements with each other. From that date they were both inside the EC and then EU, meaning they were both in the Customs Union and then the Single Market.

    After Brexit, assuming the UK leaves the Customs Union and the Single Market, numerous problems will arise, and whilst some of them will affect the UK, far more of them will affect the Republic of Ireland. The cumulative impact could destroy the country's finances in such a way that they might find themselves with the choice of relying on continual EU and IMF bailouts whilst inside the EU or leaving the EU and tying themselves in with the UK, maintaining the arrangements that have always been their lifeblood.

    In the UK, the way Ireland's economy works only tends to come into focus when we hear about their tiny corporation tax rate (12%) and the draw that these arrangements are for large tech companies like Apple and Google to locate their European headquarters in Dublin. But during my recent week in Ireland I discovered far more about just how connected the two countries are, and how two particular industries - agriculture and finance - are so reliant on the UK that I can't see how Ireland can be in if Britain is out.

    I'll start with financial services. Financial services companies can operate anywhere inside the EU under what are known as 'passporting' rules, which are essentially a series of regulations that apply to everyone operating in the industry within the EU. This ensures minimum standards of service, security and similar ways of working that makes it possible to move money anywhere needed and compete fairly. British companies have billions of pounds in the Republic of Ireland because of this concept of passporting.

    When the UK leaves, if they are no longer part of this system, those billions will probably be repatriated to Britain, because moving them back and forth to Ireland will become much harder. This would decimate the Irish financial services industry. Because Ireland is in the EU, it would not be able to make a separate deal with the UK to keep this going. So Ireland's financial services industry would need Britain to be either in the EU with it, or outside with it, rather in the different positions they would be in.

    But the problems in financial services are nothing compared to the problems that will occur in agriculture. Agriculture, remember, includes both crops and also livestock. Crops go off, so it is better if they are be exported to countries that are near, and quickly. If the UK leaves the Customs Union, that would mean a massive administration barrier, expensive in both time and money, would be created for Irish agriculture.

    To give two contrasting examples: there is a Baileys (Irish Cream alcoholic drink) bottling plant in Mallusk in Northern Ireland, making 60% of all the Baileys produced. The plant relies on the Republic of Ireland for its milk. Brexit could mean that milk has to be stopped at the border and might have tariffs on it, and suddenly both the Baileys plant and the Irish dairy farmers might not be able to operate. Second example is the transfer of horses, particularly for events like Cheltenham. At the moment they travel on lorries and ships and can pass through Britain easily and unimpeded. Britain leaving the Customs Union makes that a lot more difficult.

    Again, it's not like Ireland and the UK can come up with a special arrangement for these things. Ireland need to abide by whatever deal the EU negotiates.

    Of course, I haven't even mentioned the largest elephant in this particular room - the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic. That's because my conversations with people in Dublin suggests that they barely want to consider what would happen if a hard border re-appears, yet they simply do not see what on earth is the alternative if Britain is leaving the Customs Union.

    All of this made me realise that whereas my original thought was that at some point there could be a referendum to unite Ireland, I think instead there will soon need to be a Referendum on Ireland's EU membership. The uniting referendum had seemed possible given the problems Brexit would cause and how the people of Northern Ireland, even the Unionists, must have noticed that they were ignored during the Referendum campaign and again during the 2017 election.

    But I wonder, given the problems I have talked about above, given the fact that the Republic of Ireland sees people drive on the same side, sees the same plugs being used, and speaks the same language as the United Kingdom, whether it makes more sense for the Irish people to put themselves wherever Britain are once Brexit is finished?
     
  14. Himanshu Pandey

    Himanshu Pandey Don't get mad, get even. STAR MEMBER

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    it's your economy and your nation... you know it better..

    rather then telling right or wrong EU should accept it and wait to see outcome.. if positive.. good for you.. if negative good for EU..

    it will come out one way or another.. people should wait and accept the decision of England.


    the real problem here is what EU will do on catalan republic... will it go against people's wish or with it?
     
  15. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Splitting up nation states works in the EU's favour because it makes individual regions that are too small and weak to leave on their own.
     

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