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As call to boycott Chinese goods grows, shopkeepers say make in India first

Discussion in 'National Politics' started by InfoWarrior, Jul 16, 2017.

  1. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    How China beats India hollow in trade and dominates Indian homes, markets and economy
    Malini Goyal | ET Bureau | Updated: Jul 16, 2017, 11:45 AM IST
    257 Comments
    Highlights
    • China is India's largest trading partner, with bilateral trade at $71.5bn, but it is heavily skewed in favour of China
    • India imports $61.3 billion worth of Chinese products while it exports just $10.2 billion worth of goods to China
    [​IMG]India and China are sparring over the Doklam tri-boundary area (the third country being Bhutan), near Chicken’... Read More
    Based out of Kolkata, Gyanesh Chaudhary thought of solar long before it became fashionable. In 2006, the Harvard alumnus founded Vikram Solar, today among India's top 10 manufacturers of solar modules. Located in a special economic zone in West Bengal, it had billed itself as a pioneer in renewable energy in India. Today, it has a solar module capacity of 1 GW and employs 2,000 people.

    But here's the dichotomy. Just when India is pushing for solar energy (targeting 100 GW by 2022, 1 GW = 1,000 MW), Vikram Solar is hurting. Last quarter, capacity utilisation stood at half, even after exporting a fourth of its produce. "We are fighting the Beijing factor. Over 80% of India's solar component supplies have been hijacked by the Chinese." he says. Aggressive pricing on the back of state subsidy, a protectionist outlook and cheap finance have allowed Chinese manufacturers to outprice their domestic counterparts. Products of Vikram Solar are 8-10% costlier than Chinese imports. India's aggressive solar energy targets would mean business worth over $40 billion for component manufacturers over the next five years.

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    China seems to be grabbing most of it. "The US and Europe are taking measures to protect themselves against Chinese dumping. We have instead offered them a direct train to the Indian market. The government must ring fence Indian firms to allow them to grow," says Chaudhary.

    Miles away in Delhi, Rakesh Kumar Yadav shows you another Chinese-flavoured world. He is the president of the Federation of Sadar Bazar Traders Association. The umbrella platform for 83 other associations with 35,000 wholesale traders does business worth over Rs 3,000 crore annually and employs at least 100,000 people directly and indirectly.

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    (What happened to make in India? Why we are so stupid to import raw materials to China and import finish goods ? I don't understand ?)
    About a decade back, the traders often used to source products — toys, plastic buckets, idols of Indian gods, among others — from domestic manufacturers. In toys alone, Yadav knows many Indian manufacturers who employed 500-plus people and were their suppliers. "They have all shut down and now import from China. Cheaper and better Chinese imports have wiped out the domestic industry," says Yadav.

    On the border, India is trying to ward off Chinese aggression. In the cold Himalayan plateau, temperatures have shot up as an old political rivalry heats up. India and China are sparring over the Doklam tri-boundary area (the third country being Bhutan), near Chicken's Neck which connects India's north-eastern states to the rest of the country. Shrill calls for a boycott of Chinese goods are getting louder, with the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) and its affiliate, the Swadeshi Jagran Manch, joining in and social media networks amplifying the noise. But deep inside India, at homes and in markets, in economy and in trade, Chinese dominance is a reality. "Although lopsided, bilateral trade has grown well. Political differences have not impacted it," says DK Joshi, chief economist, Crisil.

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    China is India's largest trading partner, with bilateral trade at $71.5 billion, but it is heavily skewed in favour of China. India imports $61.3 billion worth of Chinese products while it exports just $10.2 billion worth of goods to China. From -$37.2 billion in 2011-12, trade deficit has widened in the last six years to -$51.1 billion.

    India must also worry about the qualitative skew in its trade balance. Chinese exports to India are dominated by value-added products like mobile phones, plastics, electrical goods, machinery and parts. In contrast, India's exports to China are primarily raw materials like ores, cotton and mineral fuels. "If bilateral trade suffers I, for one, will not be shedding any tears," says economist Rajiv Kumar, director, Pahle India Foundation.

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    A Layered Clash
    For the two nations that have fought a fullblown battle in 1962, the current standoff is more complicated. China leaves little doubt of its desire to lead and shape a new Asian order. It is using all the weapons at its disposal — economic, political and diplomatic — to secure its place.

    Over the years, a communist China has taken a range of policy measures to create, protect and nurture its own companies. In most sectors, it has built MNC giants like Alibaba (China's answer to Amazon), Baidu (China's Google), WeChat (China's Facebook) and Xiaomi (China's Apple). Steadily, these Chinese firms have evolved from brazen copycats who made cheap and cheerful products into world-class MNCs who can hold a candle to western MNCs.

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    The automobiles sector is a good example. Chinese carmaker Geely, which once made models like King Kong and Rolls-Royce copycat Geely GE, has come a long way. Snapping up Volvo's passenger car business in 2010, Geely today is competing with Audi, BMW and Mercedes and eyeing the luxury car market with an all-electric thrust by 2019.

    The $3 trillion Indian economy with relatively few globally competitive MNCs should hardly be a bother for the $11 trillion Chinese economy. But reality is multi-hued. Border disputes in the Northeast aren't the only big thorn in India-China relationship. When many nations have acquiesced to China's one-nation view on Tibet and Taiwan, India has refused to toe the line. Instead, it brazenly offers asylum and warm hospitality to Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama and is also courting Taiwan. Prime Minister Narendra Modi's bromance with his Japanese counterpart Shinzo Abe and deepening bilateral economic engagement too must cause Chinese President Xi Jinping some heartburn. India's objection to China building a road in the trijunction ahead of the prime minister's meeting with President Donald Trump in the US in end-June would also have not gone down well with Beijing.

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    Conversely, China's support to Pakistan, disregard for India's sovereignty in Jammu & Kashmir, the support to Jaish-e-Mohammed terrorist Masood Azhar and its opposition to India's getting a spot in the UN Security Council are constant irritants for India. A new warfront recently opened when India boycotted China's ambitious One Belt One Road project. India's defiance amid Chinese assertiveness has set the two nations on a collision path. Lopsided bilateral trade further complicates this already loaded political-diplomatic relationship.

    Dragon Eyes Elephant
    Chinese companies today dominate the telecom sector in India. In handsets, they control 51% of India's $8 billion plus smartphone market with brands like Xiaomi, Oppo, Vivo and OnePlus. The same story has been playing out in the telecom equipment sector for some time now.

    NK Goyal, ex-chairman of Telecom Equipment Manufacturers Association of India, says: "India allowed import of telecom equipment without any testing or duty or protection for the domestic industry." In 2010, around the time of the 3G auction, the government did wake up to impose an antidumping duty. In 2012, it announced a preference policy in which 30% of the orders of government departments would be reserved for local telecom gearmakers. This policy was later contested by the US and revised. (We should be very careful of US. US uses contain China policy to poke China. US just uses India to scare China into working cheaper for US. US wants to pit India and China and also not develop India.)

    Yet, India today imports telecom gear worth over Rs 70,000 crore annually, much of it from Chinese firms like Huawei and ZTE. "China has always protected its own firms and pushed companies like Apple to set up data servers locally to cater to Chinese security concerns. In the current geo-political tension, India's concerns are natural," says Jayanth Kolla, founder of telecom consultancy firm Convergence Catalyst.

    [​IMG]


    It's the same story in the power sector. In the 12th Plan alone, almost 30% of the generating capacity was imported from China. In the rapidly growing solar energy sector, between April 2016 and January 2017, solar equipment from China had a share of 87% in a market pegged at $1.9 billion.

    Unsurprisingly, in a range of sectors from steel to power to telecom, calls for anti-dumping duty and safeguard duty are rising, with the government taking note and also action. (Chinese must have bribed the government already, our people are sell outs )Recently, the prospect of Chinese firms bidding for BSNL's tender for a submarine cable system raised a security alarm.

    From mature sectors like power and telecom, China Inc is also taking positions in new sectors.

    The automobile sector has attracted the biggest Chinese foreign direct investment, with SAIC recently buying General Motors' factory in Halol in Gujarat. And Fosun Pharma took a majority stake in Hyderabadbased Gland Pharma for $1.3 billion.

    According to consultancy firm Grant Thornton, in 2017, when inbound deals dipped, the Chinese shifted gears and accounted for 31% of the inbound deal value as against 27% from the US. China's Tencent Holdings has so far invested $700 million in Flikart. Chinese digital giants have been investing heavily in India's digital ecosystem — Alibaba in Paytm, and CTrip in Make-MyTrip. Chinese real estate firms like China Fortune Land Development Company and Dalian Wanda are entering India with multibillion dollar plans for industrial townships and similar projects. And Haitong Securities was one of the investment banks that managed the public issue of shares of Central Depository Services.

    Fallout of the Standoff
    For now, rhetoric and boycott calls have taken centre-stage in India, something that China has resorted to. Most recent example: as South Korea deployed US's THAAD missile defence system, China got consumers to boycott Korean imports. In April, an official at South Korea's central bank estimated this could shave 0.2 percentage points off South Korea's economic growth this year.

    Can India resort to similar boycotts? Not when Chinese imports dominate bilateral trade. In the worst-case scenario, if the border standoff escalates and trade shrivels, you don't have to be an economist to figure who will hurt more.

    Kai Xue, a corporate lawyer in Beijing, spells it out: "The impression is that consumer goods are the biggest import (into India).

    That is wrong. In reality, capital goods dominate. A boycott would mean Indian firms will have to buy costly products from others, which will dent growth," says Kai. While China dominates India's imports, India comprises just under 3% of its total exports.


    There may be options. A venture capital investor in Bengaluru says: "If India shifts sourcing of electronics from China to Taiwan, imports from China will reduce."

    A recent government release, "Reducing Trade Gap with China", shows that Chinese exports are facing pressure in markets like the US. India too is making an effort.


    After rising consistently, between April and February in 2016-17, exports to China rose 8.69% while imports dipped 2.26%, reducing India's trade deficit by 4.1%. The trend may continue, what with Swadeshi Jagran Manch, declaring 2017 as the "year of the boycott of Chinese goods and companies" (see Yang for the Buck).

    "Boycott China. That's what I hear these days during my morning walks," says Yadav from Sadar Bazar. "We (wholesale traders) will support and nurture our own companies." But he acknowledges that this cannot happen overnight. If a boycott is the call of the day, there needs to be an alternative. "For example, there is no domestic toy industry," he says.
    Top Comment
    In simple words STOP BUYING CHINESE products.
    I just did !ashish kumar

    "The economic downside won't be very disastrous. The only people that will be disillusioned by the boycott is the Indian middle class," says Harsh Pant, head of strategic studies at the Observer Research Foundation.

    Rajiv Kumar of Pahle India isn't that sanguine. "India will be the biggest loser. Economy is at an inflection point. It will distract attention and resources away from growth," he says. "India has to be smart and strategic. Factoring in security concerns, the government must make compelling offers to lure Chinese FDI."

    (Additional reporting by Kunal Talgeri)
    http://www.business-standard.com/ar...s-say-make-in-india-first-117071600011_1.html
     
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  2. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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  3. NKVD

    NKVD Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Lol i don't understand are we not paying for the stuffs

    We own it

    Weather its chinese or USA or north korean
     
  4. dadeechi

    dadeechi Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    A country which is self sufficient in Food, Energy and Defense has nothing to worry.

    India is already self-sufficient in agriculture & food and making progress in Energy.

    The primary worry is the defense.
     
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  5. dadeechi

    dadeechi Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Modi replaced "Made in India" with "Make in India"

    "Make in India" = "Make money in India"
     
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  6. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Industrialization, Nehru-style

    The most outspoken advocate of industrialization in the early years of Indian independence was Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, an ardent believer in modern science and socialism. Nehru believed that industrialization held the key to India’s success as an independent nation. In particular, the Prime Minister focused on two types of projects, both of which required large-scale mobilizations of capital and labor and the importation of foreign technical expertise: steel mills and dams. To guide India through its rapid industrialization, Nehru inaugurated the first of India’s Soviet-style Five Year Plans in 1952.

    1
    In promoting industrialization, Nehru departed from the course taken by his predecessor, Mohandas Gandhi. In Gandhi’s vision for independent India, the village would serve as the basis for Indian life. Indian society would have none of the dehumanizing bigness of industrialization. Nehru disagreed with the central tenets of Gandhian economics. In one respect, though, Gandhian and Nehruvian economics in principle. This was in regards to economic self-sufficiency. Beginning in the 1920s, the dominant strain of Indian nationalism called for an end to not only political but also economic imperialism. In the colonial relationship between India and the West, Indian raw materials were exported from the country, processed in mills in factories in England, and sold back to India as finished goods. Gandhi believed that Indians should re-develop their own indigenous industries. The symbolic Indian product that Gandhi promoted was cotton, which he spun and wove into his own simple clothing. His disciples both in the Indian National Congress followed his example.

    2
    Nehru also believed that India should be economically self-sufficient, although his approach to self-sufficiency led through large-scale industrialization rather than village industries. Industrialization required the importation of technical expertise from the industrialized nations. India received technology transfer from both western- and eastern-bloc countries. In an earlier blog post, I described how technology transfer worked in the HF-24 Marut jet fighter program, which was developed by a joint Indian and West German team led by the German engineer Kurt Tank. East/West technology transfer happened for project such as the HF-24 as well as the large dams and steel mills that Nehru promoted.3

    Nehru participated in the ceremonies marking construction milestones for several of the dam projects initiated during his term as Prime Minister. After the 1948 groundbreaking for the Hirakud Dam in Orissa, Nehru wrote: “As I threw in some concrete, which was to form the base of the great Hirakud Dam, a sense of adventure seized me and I forgot for a while the many troubles that beset us. I felt that these troubles will pass, but that the great dam and all that follow from it will endure for ages to come.”4 The Prime Minister often compared the dams with temples or mosques. At Bhakra Dam in the Himalayan foothills, Nehru even compared the project with the greatest Indian monument of all: “The Taj Mahal is for the dead; Bhakra is for the living.”5

    The Nagarjuna Sagar Dam in Andhra Pradesh provides an example of the creative use of Indian resources for industrialization. Begun in 1955 and completed in 1967, the dam was a combined hydroelectric and irrigation project meant to irrigate the arid Deccan with the waters of the Krishna River. To save foreign exchange capital, the dam was built largely by hand with a minimum of machinery. The May 1963 issue of National Geographic carried a fold-out spread of a panoramic photo of the dam’s construction. In the image, hundreds of workers carry stones and mortar up ramps zigzagging up the face of the dam. The photo caption declared that 125,000 workers were employed in the construction of the dam; a more recent article in The Hindu Magazine stated that at no time in the construction of the project was the workforce ever small than 50,000.6 Compare this to the Grand Coulee Dam, another combined irrigation and hydro-electric make-work project of a different era; the labor force never exceeded 11,000.

    The Nagarjuna Sagar project came vividly to mind once during my sojourn in the Garo Hills. I observed (and briefly participated in) a labor-intensive house construction project. While nowhere near the scale of Nagarjuna Sagar, the project nevertheless represented the principles of using the readily-available resource of labor and sparing on machinery. Principal was building a house down the road from my school, and Headmaster dispatched several dozen boys one day to supplement the hired labor force in the task of pouring the concrete for the roof. I wandered over later in the afternoon to observe. A bamboo ramp (like at Nagarjuna Sagar, but much smaller) led up to the roof. Boys passed saucers-full of concrete from the cement mixer (the only machine on the site), man-to-man up to the roof. There, professional laborers dumped the concrete at the appropriate location and smoothed it out, while boys on the other side of the ramp passed the empty saucers back down to the cement mixer. Then the saucers began their circuit once again, and continued circling man-to-man until the entire roof was covered with freshly-laid concrete.
    1. For a discussion of Nehru’s belief in state planning, see Gyan Prakash, “Technologies of Government,” in Another Reason: Science and the Imagination of Modern India (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1999), 159-200. For an overview of Nehruvian industrialization, see Ramachandra Guha, “The Conquest of Nature,” in India After Gandhi: The History of the World’s Largest Democracy (New York: Ecco, 2007), 209-232. []
    2. Louis Fischer, The Life of Mahatma Gandhi (New York: Harper & Row, 1950), 229-231. []
    3. In the case of the Bokaro steel plant in Bihar (now Jharkhand), both the US and the USSR offered assistance at different times. After the US backed out of the project, the Soviet Union stepped in to complete it. See Padma Desai, The Bokaro Steel Plant: A Study of Soviet Economic Assistance (New York: American Elsevier Publishing Company, 1972). For an overview of the Indian steel industry as it stood in the mid-1960s, see William A. Johnson, The Steel Industry of India (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1966). []
    4. S. Gopal and Uma Iyengar, eds., The Essential Writings of Jawaharlal Nehru (New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2003), 2:66. []
    5. Quoted in “India Builds a High Dam in the Himalayas,” Life, November 3, 1958, 45. []
    6. John Scofield, “India in Crisis,” National Geographic, May 1963, 602; M. Malleswara Rao, “Taming the Krishna,” The Hindu Magazine, The Hindu : Magazine (accessed April 6, 2012).
     
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  7. zebra7

    zebra7 Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Different Era, Different Condition, Different Global situation -- Wrong Comparison.

    Only the Lefiest Congressi would attempt such comparison.

    As far as the Modi travelling all around the world is considered, he created a Brand, which is the hottest name in the whole world aka >> INDIA.
     
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  8. Notsuperstitious

    Notsuperstitious 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Such campaigna go against the principles of capitalism.

    And noone can beat capitalism. Capitalism is natural. Even chinese are capitalists today.
     
  9. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    If Modi was PM of India instead of Nehru. India wouldn't have any dam or industry. China would have entered into Delhi in 1962, and Modi would have read fare well speech to Delhi.

    If Nehru was alive, India would have been self sufficient in Electronics and Machinery. Lots of businessmen are making lots of money my trading Chinese goods in India. These business men would also finance politicians to delay industrialization of India.

    War with China will shame India so much that India will industrialize out of shame. No scope for greedy business men to import Chinese goods and make money.

    It is better for India to grow at 4% to 5% with lots of Jobs in industry than grow at 7% without jobs. India should sacrifice growth rate to build more industries. Lots of blood sucking wholesalers will pull their hairs, since they wont be able to sell Chinese goods in India.
     
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  10. Notsuperstitious

    Notsuperstitious 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Tell us exactly in simple policy terms what should be done. I would like to assess your suggestions and propagate them to influence the govt if I find them useful.

    Mind you, specific policies in clear language pls.
     
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  11. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    In simple words I will suggest that we import only the stuff which needs time for replacement till home production can start. We must ban everything which has an Indian alternative. The cheap Chinese goods have killed our own industry for those products and that must be revived. At the same time we must go on war footing to create an electronic hardware industry in India to compete with China globally using companies from Taiwan, Korea and Japan. We have abundance of raw material and the stupid policies of UPA govt have ruined us. This decade from 2004-2014 is the darkest chapter of our history.
     
  12. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    I had lots of high hopes from Modi government. But Im not a blind supporter, For me India >>> Modi. I will support Whoever serves India better, right now Modi is failing...
     
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  13. Pundrick

    Pundrick Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Products which India should import :
    1). Machinery
    2). Chemicals
    3). Solar Cells (For temporary)

    Products India should avoid :
    1). Electronics
    2). Steel
    3). Plastics
    4). Ship & Boats
    Trade imbalance is bound to come down in coming years, it is literally China's fault that they think they can play like Japan & S. Korea with India, they should have opened their market for IT & Pharma but they are still delaying it, this will further affect the relations in coming days.

    @InfoWarrior calm down bro, Nehru's industrializing plan was a complete flaw, look at what China did in 50s & 60s, their prime mover was agriculture hence they first became self sufficient and then concentrated on economic reforms in 1978.

    Though Nehru was optimistic & visionary but we didn't had the required strength at home to support his state led economic growth. Still not his fault, but he shouldn't be appreciated for something which is not an achievement but a failure.
     
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  14. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    As call to boycott Chinese goods grows, shopkeepers say make in India first
    Association of school principals called for boycott of Chinese goods in light of continuing tension
    Sruthi Ganapathy Raman | Scroll.in July 16, 2017 Last Updated at 00:07 IST

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    Mumbai’s schoolchildren can teach China a lesson — that is what an association of school principals in the city believes. On Monday, July 10, it called for a boycott of Chinese goods in light of continuing tension between India and China in Sikkim, where a face-off between soldiers from both sides over the construction of a road on the Doklam plateau has been on for more than a month.




    “With the Chinese government using its military might against India, as citizens, we should ensure that we do not help the Chinese economy to grow,” said Prashant Redij, secretary of the Mumbai Schools Principals Association. The association — which has around 1,900 principals as members and governs numerous schools in the city — has decided to appeal to students and heads of schools to stop using stationery and other articles made in the East Asian country, in a bid to inculcate patriotism. “If parents consciously decide to buy local products, it will boost our own economy instead of contributing to the Chinese economy,” Redij added.

    Adding to the boycott chorus, an Andheri-based non-government organisation has announced protests against Chinese imports to send “a message of patriotism among masses”. Such protests are not new in India. In October, a social media campaign to boycott Chinese products had followed China’s decision to back Pakistan by vetoing India’s plea to the United Nations to name Jaish-e-Mohammed chief Masood Azhar as a terrorist.


    But what is the plausibility of such a boycott in a city as sprawling as Mumbai? Most shopkeepers on Bazaar Road, a market in the western suburb of Bandra, at least, seemed unconvinced that they could get their customers to switch from the cheaper and more popular Chinese imports to Indian products.

    A trade face-off


    • An association of school principals called for a boycott of Chinese goods in light of continuing tension between India and China in Sikkim
    • An Andheri-based non-government organisation has also announced protests against Chinese imports to send “a message of patriotism among masses”
    • In October, a social media campaign to boycott Chinese products had followed China’s decision to back Pakistan by vetoing India’s plea to the United Nations to name Jaish-e-Mohammed chief Masood Azhar as a terrorist

    Cheap and cheerful

    Bazaar Road is chock full of stationery, apparel and toy stores selling brightly coloured plastic bags, pencil boxes and clothes emblazoned with cartoon characters. “Chinese products come in various forms into the Indian market and they are very cheap,” said Aslam of Al Burhan Collections, one such shop. “Even if we do advertise the Indian branded ones to the customers, they do not go for it.”

    From affordability to novelty, shopkeepers here are unanimously on the same page about the foreign products’ undeniable presence in every shop. “Almost 99 per cent of my shop is filled with China-made articles,” said the shopkeeper at Popular Stores, also on Bazaar Road. “The making charges for Chinese-made products is much less, which makes their buying price also very cheap.”

    Raju Agowane, the owner of a hole-in-the-wall shoe store in Bandra, held up two pairs of slippers, one made in China and the other in India, to explain the difference between the two. With its shiny plastic, the black pair evidently stands out as a Chinese item and costs Rs 100. The pink footwear, on the other hand, is priced at Rs 140 and is made in India.

    In the 1970s, China introduced economic reforms that stepped up its manufacturing capacity. Decades later, it exports cheaply produced goods to many countries in Asia and Africa, including India. But affordability is not the only reason why its products reign over Indian markets. “Be it a pen or a pouch, children like them to be different and colourful,” Aslam said. “The Chinese products give them just that. It is that simple.”

    Farooq Sheikh, who sells clothes, agreed. Holding up a pair of cotton pyjamas in a dull shade against striking synthetic ones plastered with images of Cinderella and Princess Jasmine, he asked, “With both the pyjamas priced at Rs 150, why would a child go for the cotton one when she gets to show off her favourite cartoons for the same price?”

    It is the same story with the lunch bags sold in Mohammad Ansari’s store. Both cost Rs 150, but one features Disney stars while the other is a printed jute bag.

    With affordability, however, comes a fall in the product’s durability. But that might not necessarily be a bad thing.

    “There is no use for products like rain shoes or baby strollers once the need passes,” Aslam said. Another retailer added that while most Indian goods come with guarantees, customers prefer use-and-throw articles to running around in circles to get their products fixed. Also, while there are abundant Indian versions of Chinese products, available at a slightly higher cost, there are a few products that are exclusively made-in-China, the shopkeepers said. Mosquito racquets and remote-controlled toys, for instance. “Their robotic technology enables them to produce even the most intricate things,” said Huzaifa of Saifee Stores and Stationery. “When India starts manufacturing goods like the mosquito bat, which is a necessary household item, maybe then people will stop buying China-made imports.”

    Patriotism versus trade

    On a street in this neighbourhood, a woman in her early 60s dug through a pile of frocks and shirts for children. She was picking out clothes for her grandson. “Change is not new under the Modi government,” said Neeta Modi, laughingly pronouncing her last name. Mistaking the boycott call for an advisory from Prime Minister Narendra Modi, she added, “Look at how many changes have been thrown at us. If we can accept demonetisation and GST [the goods and services tax], we can lay off the Chinese products too for some time.”

    Rukaiya, another grandmother keenly eyeing onesies and nightwear for her grandchildren at a store in Bandra’s Elco shopping arcade, declared that she does not purchase Chinese goods but is nevertheless shocked by the call for a boycott. “Patriotism and trade are two different things,” she said. “These two must never be mixed up since the profit made is mutual between both countries.”

    Ramesh, the shopkeeper at Gemini Stationery, admitted, “If the boycott does happen, our businesses will definitely be hit because more than half our products are China-made.” Notebooks and paper, however, are mostly manufactured in India, he added.

    Many among the market’s smaller retailers echoed Ramesh’s view and affirmed that a boycott of Chinese goods would lead to losses.

    But the locality’s bigger shops do not think the same. “If the government helps us do it, then why not?” asked Bharat of Twinkle Gifts. “There is no case of loss as it is an advantage for India only.”

    But Iqbal, the owner of a toy shop, pointed out that Indian manufacturers would have to up their game if they were to seriously compete with China. “We will be more than happy to sell it [Indian products], but for that to happen, we need to make more in India,” he explained.

    The question that remains is: will this latest boycott call in any way boost the “make in India” campaign, as the association of school principals believes?

    As Iqbal summed it up: “People are so used to Chinese goods. All of this is good to hear, but I am not sure if a complete boycott is possible.”

    In arrangement with Scroll.in
    http://www.business-standard.com/ar...s-say-make-in-india-first-117071600011_1.html
     
    Angel Eyes likes this.
  15. Flyboy!

    Flyboy! Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Indo chinese exports-import percentages are same as chinese american ratios. The problem is that American goods produced in China are of high quality, produced to US standards and the stuff that comes to india is rubbish,low quality, reverse engineered stuff by local companies to make profit. Regulation on quality will help iron things out.
     

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