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Boeing Chinook Wins Indian Helicopter Competition

Discussion in 'Indian Air Force' started by Manmohan Yadav, Nov 6, 2012.

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  1. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    NEW DELHI — Boeing’s CH-47F Chinook helicopter has beaten out Russia’s Mi-26 in India’s $1.4 billion heavy lift helicopter competition.

    The Indian Defence Ministry opened commercial bids last week; according to MoD sources, the Russian bid was set aside after officials failed to provide details on how they would execute their offset liabilities.

    The Russian officials have not been officially notified about the results and declined to comment.

    [​IMG]

    The Chinook and advanced version of the Mi-26 helicopter were put to flight trials last year in desert and high-altitude terrain.

    The Indian Air Force will use the 15 heavy lift helicopters, with delivery to be completed within 54 months of the contract signing, which is expected to occur by March. The Chinooks will replace India’s existing Mi-26 fleet, more than two dozen helicopters purchased in the 1980s and the majority of which have been grounded for lack of spares. Capable of carrying more than 45 fully equipped troops, the Chinooks will be able to cruise at 230 kilometers per hour, an Indian Air Force official said.

    The selection is one of several recent wins for U.S. firms in India. In October, the MoD finalized the selection of 22 Boeing AH-64D Apache helicopters over Russia’s Mi-28s in its $1.3 billion heavy duty attack helicopter program. The U.S. has contracted weapons and equipment sales of more than $8 billion in the past four years, including a $4.1 billion contract to sell 10 C-17 transport aircraft to the Indian Air Force.

    “The Americans are emerging as one of the top suppliers of weapons and equipment to India, and in the years ahead, U.S. and western sources will become even more predominant in supply of weapons for India,†said defense analyst Nitin Mehta. “It is a welcome trend that India is slowly loosening its dependency on Russia for meeting its weapons needs.â€

    A Russian diplomat here said Russia will ensure that it continues to be a long-term supplier of weapons and equipment and would not say whether Moscow is concerned over India’s decisions favoring the U.S. and the West.

    However, Russian President Vladimir Putin postponed an early November visit to India, in what analysts said is a show of displeasure over New Delhi’s arms decisions.

    “The Russians have offered India several weapons programs with transfer of technology and even joint production of high-tech equipment. In cases when Washington facilitates greater cooperation with India on joint development basis, then the Russians will have to compete harder to find their [share of] India’s weapons market, estimated at over $100 billion,†said Mahindra Singh, retired Indian Army brigadier general.

    The Americans are also locked in competition for the Indian Navy’s multirole helicopter program, in which NH90 helicopters of NHIndustries are competing with Sikorsky’s S-70B.

    Sources said the commercial bids for 16 helicopters are expected to be opened by the end of the year. The Indian Navy has also decided to float another global tender worth more than $4 billion to purchase an additional 75 multirole helicopters.

    The multirole helicopters will be needed to replace the aging Sea King helicopters from the 1980s, the majority of which are grounded due to old age and shortage of spares.

    The helicopters will be used in limited intelligence gathering, search and rescue, casualty evacuation and surveillance roles.
     
  2. Star Wars

    Star Wars Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Chinooks in india !!!! F**K YEAH !!!
     
  3. sunny6611

    sunny6611 Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    The Chinooks will replace India’s existing Mi-26 fleet, more than two dozen helicopters purchased in the 1980s

    IAF has :

    Number Procured: 4
    ..........................Two (Z2897, Z2898) in May 86
    ..........................Two (Z3075, Z3076) in Feb 89

    where are the other "20" ?
     
  4. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    I remember Panetta saying we need to rework the strategy to Engage India in defense sector. Seems it is working... :lol:

    Also i want to know does DRDO has any projects which can compete in this level of Heavy lift coppers.
     
  5. Sancho

    Sancho Lt. Colonel IDF NewBie

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    That's wrong:

    Indian Air Force :: Mil Mi-26
     
  6. sunny6611

    sunny6611 Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Country Flag:
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    Number Procured: 4
    ..........................Two (Z2897, Z2898) in May 86
    ..........................Two (Z3075, Z3076) in Feb 89


    Units Equipped: 1
    ....................... 126 Helicopter Flight "Feather Weights"

    Brief History:

    The Mi-26 was procured to meet the Heavy Lift requirements of the IAF. A requirement of six helicopters was projected and the first two Helicopters were procured at a cost of Rs 18 Cr each in May 1986. No. 126 Helicopter Flight was raised the same month to operate the type. The Flight has a Unit Establishment of 18 Officers, 142 airmen and 28 NCs(E) and four Helicopters. The other two helicopters were procured and inducted in February 1989 at a cost of approx Rs 22.71 Cr each. Due to low utilisation, the plan to procure two more helicopters was dropped. For the total fleet of four helicopters, twelve engines were procured.

    Serviceability of the Helicopter suffered in the 90s, at one point of time in 1995-96, as many as three of the four helicopters remaining on ground. Serviceability gradually fell in the mid 90s from a high of 61% down to 40%. The helicopters also remained underutilized. Against a projected utilization rate of 50 hours per month per helicopter, the average utilization hovered around 11 to 22 hours per month.

    The first two Helicopters procured in 1986 were due for an overhaul in 1990. The two helicopters were ferried to Russia for overhaul in June 1991 and were returned in August 1993.

    The fourth Helicopter came up for overhaul in October 1996 and was given an extension of an year after maintenance by the Base Repair Depot. However the helicopter suffered some damage after one of the undercarriage struts failed in August 1997. The damaged helicopter was subsequently overhauled by the manufacturer in January 2003 at a cost of Rs 16.8 Crores.

    During the Kargil Operations, two Mi-26s logged about 25 hours airlifting heavy equipment and guns to the Kargil area.

    In July 2005, a Helicopter of the unit landing at Rampur in Himachal Pradesh was damaged after the rotor got entangled in high tension electrical cables. The aircraft was being used in helilifting heavy road building equipment in the area.

    One Mi-26 (Z3076) was written off after it crashed at Jammu airport on 14 Dec 2010. It was involved in the heavy lift of tunneling equipment for the Northern Railways. The crew escaped with injuries. This was the first and till date the only major airframe loss for the Mi-26 in nearly 25 years of service.

    The Mi-26s have been utilised in the sky-crane role over the years.

    - Feb 89, MI-26 helicopter undertook the only of its kind underslung operation taking Pontoon bridge form Ludhiana to Sirhind canal.
    - Early 1999, a crashed MiG-21 was airlifted by the Unit to Chandigarh.
    - 21 Nov 2001, the Mi-8 which crashed in the Rann of Kutch was helilifted by the Mi-26s to Bhuj.
    - 2002, a MiG-21 Bison which crashed in the fields near Ambala was airlifted by the Unit to Ambala Air Force Station.
    - In Jul 2002 the Mi-26 recovered the first civilian aircraft (Beechcraft), which had met with an accident at Kangra airfield. Another first was achieved as the unit flew the longest ever underslung flight (3:15 hrs).
    - 22 Feb 2006 - An Mi-26 flown by the CO, Wg Cdr Sushil Ghera, airlifted an Mi-17 that forcelanded in a river bed a few days earlier to Chandigarh Air Force Station.
    -Sept 2007 - Mi-17 1V airlifted from Bandipore to Awantipura
    -In 2010, the helicopter was actively used to lift heavy equipment for the Katra-Quazigand Railway project providing rail connectivity to the Srinagar Valley.
    [MENTION=6541]Sancho[/MENTION] the whole article is for the 4 helos


    again where r the other 20 helos as mentioned (The Chinooks will replace India’s existing Mi-26 fleet, more than two dozen helicopters purchased in the 1980s

    Source: http://www.indiandefence.com/forums...n-helicopter-competition.html#ixzz2Z62jXTbI)?

    my dad was the 1st CO of 4 helo squadrons of IAF & 1 of the first 4 helo flight instructors of IAF.
    IAF has honored him many times for his contribution to IAF helos.

    so.......... info on helos comes from him.
     
  7. yahya

    yahya 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    24 mi 26 seems the reporters is kidding what i know that india only had 4 to 10 thats it
     
  8. Sancho

    Sancho Lt. Colonel IDF NewBie

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    As I said that's wrong, only 4 were procured and the requirement back than was for 6 only. The Mi 24 were procured in roughly 2 dozen numbers and the article might have confused that.
     
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