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BRICS : News & Discussions

Discussion in 'International Relations' started by PARIKRAMA, Oct 16, 2016.

  1. PARIKRAMA

    PARIKRAMA Captain IDF NewBie

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    Lessons from Brics 2016: Old friends are good, but China is keen to contain India
    David Devadas Oct 16, 2016 16:29 IST

    [​IMG]

    If one cuts past the specific agreements, the Brics summit in Goa reveals three basic geo-strategic facts. The third is the most significant, but the first and second are more obvious.

    Most obvious is the fact that the post-Cold War churning in geopolitics is still underway. In that light, the highlight of the summit was that India sought to restore its tried-and-tested relationship with Russia, from which it had moved decidedly away after the Soviet Union collapsed.

    That was a mistake. It is all good that Prime Minister Narendra Modi is moving closer to President Vladimir Putin. It's not just that they are arguably the two most identifiable strong men on the world stage. There are long-term strategic interests. The Soviet Union had supported India since its independence. And after China tested a nuclear weapon in 1964, it identified India as a lodestar of its foreign policy. In the more-than-half-century since then, these three countries and the US have emerged as the four most important in the world.



    Only Brazil, Japan, Indonesia and Pakistan compare in population size, but not in military might. Some had speculated soon after (and before) the Soviet Union collapsed that the European Union could emerge as a world power - an economic counterweight to the US. But the EU has teetered on the edge of collapse for some time now.

    Hyphenation remains

    The second fact about current geopolitics to emerge in the backdrop of the Brics summit is that south Asia is a major key to the relationship between the four big world powers. Despite India's best efforts to 'de-hyphenate' India and Pakistan, the two countries' relations have influenced the way India, Russia and China have warily circled each other, like hefty kabaddi players.

    Indian strategists must get used to the fact that the Partition created platforms on India's flanks that can be manipulated to destabilise the subcontinent - unless India goes the extra mile to strengthen subcontinental ties, as the visionary former Prime Minister Vajpayee sought to do at Saarc's Islamabad summit in 2004.

    The fact is that Russia's recent military exercises with Pakistan were at least partly responsible for India reaching out to its old ally; 'an old friend is worth two new ones', Prime Minister Modi told his joint press conference with Putin in Goa.

    To seek close strategic relationships with the US and Russia simultaneously at a time when something close to Cold War tensions have developed between them over Syria is, let us say, bold. But it is well worth doing. In fact, the face-off over Syria is all the more reason why neither would want to antagonise India.

    Pakistan has become even more pivotal to Sino-Indian relations than to India-Russia or Indo-US ties. China's blocking of India's attempt to add Masood Azhar to the UN's list of terrorists highlights the extent to which it backs Pakistan. Its blocking of India's membership of the Nuclear Suppliers Group too stems from Pakistan's desire to be included alongside.

    Whatever satisfaction Indian strategists derive from Moscow and other world powers, it would be unwise to underestimate the threat potentially posed by Beijing

    The future is here

    The third geopolitical fact that has emerged is less obvious. In fact, some might dispute it. And that fact is that China already sees India as its chief rival. Most geopolitical analysts still see China and the US as the world's main competitors. But most also agree that China and India are likely to be the world's big powers in a few decades. China's strategic moves make it clear that its chief objective is to hobble India.

    It's as if two catch-up races were being run in tandem - only the one in the lead in each race is trying to block the one running behind it with a sort of ring of fire. While US moves to hem in China (in the South China Sea, for example) have had limited success, China is moving even more vigorously to encircle India in south Asia. The fate of the Chinese economy in the near future will have an impact on India's future.

    Whether or not Saarc moves forward, and how potential alternatives to Saarc develop, is a major part of China's game of encirclement. China has invested a range of resources in the subcontinent.

    The big surprise of the Brics meet came a day before it began - when China committed a whopping $28 billion to Bangladesh during Chinese President Xi Jinping's visit there on Friday, en route to Goa. Just a couple of weeks ago, Bangladesh had taken the lead to have the Saarc summit in Pakistan postponed, following the attack at Uri. The new Chinese alliance is likely to weaken Bangladesh's coordination with India against Pakistan. We will have to wait and see how much more damage that Chinese investment might cause India.

    Other than China's attempt to throw a ring of fire around India, it is much harder to explain such massive investment in Bangladesh than it is to explain China's $46 billion commitment to Pakistan. For, the latter investment is earmarked for the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC). Likely to become China's major trade route to the world, the CPEC is of great advantage to China. Surely Bangladesh's gas reserves could not be worth that much.

    Of course CPEC causes Sino-Indian conflict far more directly than China's investments elsewhere: the trade corridor passes through parts of the state of Jammu and Kashmir under Pakistan's control - which India claims juridically. Chinese troops have been in those parts of the state for some time for the security of the highway, railway and other CPEC projects.

    Whatever satisfaction Indian strategists derive from Moscow and other world powers, it would be unwise to underestimate the threat potentially posed by Beijing
    http://m.firstpost.com/india/lesson...t-china-is-keen-to-contain-india-3054866.html

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    It's a good article.. what are your thoughts
    .
     
  2. Sathya

    Sathya Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Masood Azar, a terrorist got released for exchange of hostages in Kandahar ..
    World knows it .

    China is blocking him to be designated as terrorist.
    China is losing its credibility for a single person that too a terrorist.

    Blocking NSG membership is something, but backing a terrorist?

    I wish India make import restrictions of low quality Chinese products and allow India mic to compete with quality Chinese products
     
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  3. Nilgiri

    Nilgiri Lieutenant IDF NewBie

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    Overall its ok article and yes India must be wary and measured in her response.

    However I feel the investment into BD is not confusing at all. Firstly it is over a long time period, much longer than CPEC...so the per year average is somewhat lower. Secondly BD GCF (gross capital formation) is already high (compared to Pakistan), so its natural that China wants a piece of that pie in sustained long term fashion, especially with its massive surplus liquidity.

    BD under SHW, SL, Nepal will work with India and China economically....and will support India politically over Pakistan when push comes to shove under their current administrations. Only Pakistan can truly be called a Chinese ally, we need not worry too much about the rest. I mean India is also free to engage with Japan, PH, Vietnam and other countries currently in varying levels of confrontation with China too.
     
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  4. nair

    nair Guest

    China knows this very well....
     
  5. PARIKRAMA

    PARIKRAMA Captain IDF NewBie

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    India uses BRICS to outmaneuver Pakistan
    By Shi Lancha Source:Global Times Published: 2016/10/18 21:13:39
    27


    Over the weekend, the 8th BRICS summit was held in the Indian seaside resort state Goa. The leaders of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa met to discuss issues ranging from regional security, to financial infrastructure, to global economic and financial governance. India, which assumed BRICS chairmanship on February 15 this year, hosted the summit with the core theme "building responsive, inclusive and collective solutions."

    During the summit, India presented itself as a bright spot in a bloc whose other members have been buffeted by economic headwinds to varying degrees. With a GDP growth rate of 7.5 percent in 2015 against a rather gloomy global backdrop, India has replaced China as the world's fastest-growing large economy.

    Only three years ago, India was still labeled as one of the "RIBS," whose feeble and volatile growth contrasted sharply to China's robust performance. Nowadays, the Russian and Brazilian economies have deteriorated into recession, South Africa struggles to avoid the same fate, and China's decades-long economic boom has geared down. But India finds confidence in talking about economic matters. After all, the setbacks undergone by its fellow countries made India's recent economic achievements shine even brighter in comparison.

    Although India's domestic reforms have only made limited inroads in key areas such as land acquisition and labor regulation, an aspirant Modi equipped with newly gained confidence on India's growth prospects has clearly made the country more proactive. For India, this BRICS summit has been a wonderful platform to coordinate efforts in reforming current global economic and finance governance.

    This effect becomes more visible as the operationalization of the New Development Bank (NDB) and the Contingent Reserve Arrangement (CRA) have put pressures on the current international finance system, giving India tangible leverage in demanding relevant reforms. For example, the Goa Declaration urges advanced European economies to cede two chairs on the Executive Board of the IMF, to which India may have an upper hand to claim thanks to its huge potential and robust growth recently.

    The BRICS summit brings India an ideal mechanism to articulate and push for its reformist demands together with like-minded countries. This common front became particularly valuable for New Delhi, especially as its arduous bids for Nuclear Suppliers Group's (NSG) membership as well as for a permanent seat on an enlarged United Nation Security Council have both met frustration.

    A major difference between the Goa summit and the previous ones was that New Delhi put the Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC) in tandem with the BRICS meeting.

    Given the uneasy background of Indo-Pakistani tension, which escalated last month, India's inclusion of BIMSTEC bore even thicker geostrategic connotations. As India invited all countries in the region except Pakistan, it in effect consigned Pakistan to be a regional pariah.

    In the wake of a cross-border strike killing 19 Indian soldiers, New Delhi withdrew from the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) which was to be held in November in Pakistan. The collapse of the SAARC summit presented India a rare opportunity to get rid of any constraints Islamabad may have over the regional group, as the same group would soon gather in Goa in the absence of Pakistan.

    By bringing regional countries - Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Myanmar, Nepal and Bhutan - together with the major emerging economies of the BRICS, India breathed legitimacy and substance into an otherwise hallow and moribund acronym organization. While the rest of the BRICS members would never openly endorse either side in the Indo-Pakistan tension, India in a way secured its stance vis-à-vis Pakistan by taking advantages of its agenda-setting powers for the summits.

    While the prospect of BIMSTEC as a more effective alternative to SAARC remains ambiguous, a subcontinent grouping without Pakistan balancing and checking a dominant India may well raise suspicions and fear for smaller countries.

    The author is a visiting scholar at Tsinghua University.opinion@globaltimes.com.cn Follow us on Twitter @GTopinion

    http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1012139.shtml
     
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  6. Inactive

    Inactive Guest

    Absolute brilliance. That is why, must credit the present Government, the IFS-IAS and the Defence/Security Forces, the synergism and cohesiveness displayed, along with the seamless integration of operational objectives as applicable to each department, towards attainment of the national objective, is excellent!!
     
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  7. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    The 9th BRICS summit in Xiamen, China is not a routine meeting because it comes at a time when the bloc is entering a new stage of intensive development.

    Moreover, it is the place for China to demonstrate its new role in international relations and the global economy.

    The summit also comes at a time of increased political tensions in different areas, both close to the venue itself – that is, the Korean peninsula – and faraway Syria and the Middle East.

    At the same time, US policy seems to be in disarray and there is no clear understanding of how US President Donald Trump’s inward looking economic policy would be coordinated with the aggressive interference in other countries, which still remains the trademark of his administration’s activities despite his intention to withdraw from many regions.

    The Alternative

    BRICS, therefore, should demonstrate its role as an alternative source of power, derived from the combination of global rising powers that can contribute to the stability of the world order and introduce new rules of behavior, and new rules of cooperation on an international scale.

    Regional security issues are acute. The BRICS mechanism has already proved its efficiency in becoming a channel for finding solutions in the bilateral and intra-BRICS political arena.

    It was during a BRICS High Representatives meeting in China when Chinese and Indian officials found compromise to the Doklam territorial issue.

    For most of this summer, Indian and Chinese troops were engaged in a tense military standoff in the Doklam area on the Sikkim sector of the India-China border.

    Their compromise to disengage on August 28was implemented just in time so as to not aggravate the BRICS summit.

    BRICS will also be united on issues like the Korean peninsula and the need for a diplomatic solution to this problem, and on the fight against terrorism as well as other hot issues of today’s world.

    BRICS is in fact presenting a clear-cut strategy of creating a just world order which facilitates an increasing role for developing nations, including the bloc.

    In fact, BRICS is becoming the meeting place for developing countries and the platform for South-South cooperation.

    The “BRICS-plus” concept introduced by China (to invite five other nations to attend the Summit) is the innovation that brings to the BRICS process other regional powers on a permanent basis, and not on a case-by-case basis which it was before.

    We hope that it is not a one time event and in the future a sort of “BRICS friends club” will emerge that will help these countries to cooperate with BRICS on various economic and political bases.

    Financial Redesign

    BRICS is particularly interested in the financial architecture of the world, and the Xiamen Summit will help develop the new approaches to increasing the influential role of BRICS and other developing countries in structures like the IMF and World Bank.

    A demonstration of this financial vigor is nowhere more evident than in the increasing activity of the New Development Bank.

    It has adopted its long-term strategy; it just opened its branch office in Johannesburg (South Africa) and is scheduled to open such branch offices in other BRICS countries.

    The Bank has already disbursed $1.5 billion in the first seven credit lines for all BRICS countries and now is planning to disburse another $2.5 to 3 billion this year for projects as different as Russian judicial system informatisation and Chinese ecological projects.

    The BRICS summit will surely defend the bloc’s position on the observation of WTO rules, will strongly stand against protectionism and economic discrimination, sanctions and attempts to downgrade the ratings of BRICS countries.

    It is also vital that BRICS brings new ideas into the information security sphere, suggesting to sign a new intra-BRICS agreement on international information security.

    This is a very logical sphere of BRICS’s interest because the five nations comprise the greatest number of internet users in the world and access should not be a national regulated enterprise but the sphere of necessity for all mankind.

    This is part of where BRICS can demonstrate a new level of cooperation in humanitarian and people exchange in the science and technology, civil sector, youth, women etc.

    China’s hosting of the summit, in line with the Beijing leadership’s commitment to increase multilateralism and globalization, will help BRICS move further intensively and extensively by pushing from the project inception stage to discussions, from discussions to signing the agreements and the real “on the ground” implementation.

    That will help consolidate BRICS’s role as a vital player in global governance.

    http://thebricspost.com/a-brighter-future-for-brics/#.Waz16SPhUwg
     
  8. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

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    China wants India to go slow on Asia-Africa corridor to keep Japan out


    BEIJING: China has initiated a move to persuade India to go slow on the Asia Africa Growth Corridor, which New Delhi has formulated along with Japan. It is seen by many as an alternative Silk Road to tap the African market.

    Beijing is now trying to persuade India and South Africa to merge the project with the BRICS platform and keep its rival, Japan, out of it. Once merged into BRICS, India's influence on Africa through the project will also get diluted.

    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/60345807.cms
     
  9. An Indian

    An Indian 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    I'm just wondering if there's something wrong with their thinking (or is it just me jumping at shadows).

    When you don't want someone (who you consider a rival) to do something, you don't directly tell them what to do what not to do. It is a good way of betraying your intentions and helping your rivals to make better decisions... The better way is to gently lead them down the garden path into a maze...

    Or is it they want us to accelerate on the Asia-Africa corridor and keep Japan - doesn't make sense from their perspective? Hmmmm... The downside of guessing and then double-guessing.

    BTW, what doesn't seem to have factored in this discussion is the fact that China is in deep (economic) doodoo: http://economictimes.indiatimes.com...-is-heading-your-way/articleshow/60373833.cms

    All this stuff (including CPEC/OBOR etc.,) will all go bust once they implode (mind you - I'm saying "once they implode" not "if they implode")...
     
  10. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

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    Pakistan rejects BRICS' statement on terrorist groups


    ISLAMABAD: Pakistan on Tuesday rejected a statement by the five emerging-market BRICS powers that terrorist groups in Pakistan pose a regional security concern, with its defence minister saying no group operates freely inside Pakistan.

    The minister's response follows a statement on Monday by Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa that also called for patrons of the Pakistan-based terrorist groups to be held to account.

    "These organizations, they have some of their remnants in Pakistan, which we're cleaning," defence minister Khurram Dastagir Khan told the Geo TV channel, without specifying which groups he was referring to.

    "But Pakistan, we reject this thing categorically, no terrorist organization has any complete safe havens."

    The groups named by the BRICS include anti-India terrorist factions such as Jaish-e-Mohammad, which was blamed for a 2001 attack on India's parliament, and Lashkar-e-Taiba, which India blames for cross-border attacks including a 2008 assault in its financial capital Mumbai in which 166 people were killed.

    Another group the BRICS named was the Haqqani network, which is allied with the Afghan Taliban, waging war on the US-backed government in Kabul and foreign forces there.
    The United States has been calling on Pakistan to do more to tackle alleged Haqqani network sanctuaries on the Pakistani side of the Afghan border, or it might cut military aid.

    China is also concerned about Islamist influence spilling over from Pakistan and Afghanistan into its far-western Xinjiang region, where some members of a Muslim minority chafe at Chinese Communist Party rule.
    Countries attending a December conference aimed at stabilising Afghanistan made a similar statement, naming several Pakistan-based groups as a source of concern.

    Pakistan has always strongly denied offering safe havens to terrorist groups.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...-on-terrorist-groups/articleshow/60378334.cms
     
  11. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

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  12. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

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  13. sunstersun

    sunstersun Lieutenant IDF NewBie

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    No surprise really, China and India are #1 and #2 in Asia. How many times have you seen #1 and #2 be friends in history?

    UK/France? Germany/USSR? USA/USSR?
     
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