Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

British Armed Forces Thread

Discussion in 'Europe & Russia' started by HMS Astute, Aug 23, 2014.

  1. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,706
    Likes Received:
    2,996
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    [​IMG]

    Top Trumps:D
    [​IMG]
     
    Dagger and Blue Marlin like this.
  2. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,706
    Likes Received:
    2,996
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    Gessler likes this.
  3. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,950
    Likes Received:
    5,847
    Country Flag:
    India
    BMD likes this.
  4. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,706
    Likes Received:
    2,996
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    Interesting that they're thinking about deploying F-35Bs though.
     
  5. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,950
    Likes Received:
    5,847
    Country Flag:
    India
    No they are not, At least for now.
     
    BMD likes this.
  6. Blue Marlin

    Blue Marlin 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2016
    Messages:
    373
    Likes Received:
    224
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    that was the original idea but chose not to as there not enough room to operate enough f35's the Turkish ship can hold 12 f35b's, thats not even a squadron. also it would mean the air force would have to order less f35a's, and its more expensive to operate. as for turkey i suspect they are working on an aircraft carrier.
    as for our carriers they can hold ~40 during regular operations and ~70 at max capacity.
     
  7. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,706
    Likes Received:
    2,996
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    Squadrons actually vary in size depending on country and era. UK squadron size is 12, but was 24 back in WWII.

    70? I would have guessed they could hold 50 given size relative to CdG but 70?
     
  8. Blue Marlin

    Blue Marlin 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2016
    Messages:
    373
    Likes Received:
    224
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    40 is for standard operations, i guess you can go to about 55 ish to sustain standard operations. do note they dont even need a ramp to take of, but im most cases they do. so they can store fighters on the ramp and the area needed to take of from the ramp.
     
  9. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,706
    Likes Received:
    2,996
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    http://thediplomat.com/2017/03/japan-and-uk-to-collaborate-on-advanced-stealth-fighter-jet/

    Japan and UK to Collaborate on Advanced Stealth Fighter Jet
    Japan and the United Kingdom have agreed to explore options to jointly develop a new fighter aircraft.

    [​IMG]
    By Franz-Stefan Gady
    [​IMG]


    Japan’s Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics Agency and the United Kingdom’s Ministry of Defense have concluded an agreement to explore options for co-developing an advanced fighter jet, according to a March 16 press release by the Japanese Ministry of Defense.

    The agreement stipulates that both countries will exchange information about advanced aviation technology and also conduct a joint study on the feasibility of co-developing a new fighter aircraft in the coming years.

    The press release further notes that Japan will continue to explore fighter jet co-development options with other countries. “Regarding the possibility of international joint development on fighter aircraft in the future, we will continue to exchange views with other countries,” the MoD statement reads.

    Enjoying this article? Click here to subscribe for full access. Just $5 a month.
    While the next-generation fighter jet project would be the biggest Japan-UK collaboration on sensitive defense technology so far, both countries are also a working on jointly developing a new ramjet-powered, beyond a visual range air-to-air missile.

    During a January 2016 visit, the UK defense minister and his Japanese counterpart agreed to move discussions on the project to the next stage. The aim of the project is to integrate Japanese seeker technologies into the European Meteor Beyond Visual Range Air-to-Air Missile.

    In October 2016, the UK Royal Air Force (RAF) and the Japan Air Self-Defense Force (JASDF) also held their first-ever joint aerial combat drill, dubbed Guardian North 16, in Japan. The exercise involved four RAF Eurofighter Typhoon fighter jets, JASDF Boeing F-15J all-weather air superiority fighters and Mitsubishi F-2s.

    The Eurofighter consortium, which includes the United Kingdom, unsuccessfully tried to pitch the Eurofighter Typhoon aircraft to Japan in 2011. The JASDF, however, opted for the U.S.-made F-35A Lightning II stealth fighter jet instead. Japan placed an order for 42 F-35 through the U.S. Foreign Military Sales Program in 2011. The first aircraft was handed over to the JASDF in December 2016.

    Nevertheless, the F-35 order is an interim solution and Japan is slated to procure up to 100 new fifth-generation air superiority fighters by the 2030s. An estimated $40 billion contract is expected to be awarded in the summer of 2018 (See: “Japan’s Air Force to Receive 100 New Stealth Fighter Jets”).

    As I explained in July 2016, Japan has three options for procuring for the new aircraft: “First, develop an indigenous air superiority fighter. Second, partner with a foreign defense contractor and license-produce a new aircraft. Third, import or upgrade an existing platform.” The UK-Japan joint study falls into the second option of partnering with a foreign aircraft maker.

    However, U.S. aircraft makers will remain Japan’s top choice for any future fighter jet co-development projects. Last year, Japan unveiled an experimental fifth-generation fighter technology demonstrator, dubbed X-2 “Shinshin” (formerly the ATD-X), which will be the basis for the JASDF’s so-called (F-3) Future Fighter Program. As I reported last year, U.S. defense contractor Lockheed-Martin is purportedly already involved with the project in some capacity.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Dagger likes this.
  10. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,706
    Likes Received:
    2,996
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    supposedly they are aiming to fit an xasm-3 in there. but good luck with that, I'm not sure if that'd even fit the TU-160 bay

    a bit more about the new engine

    [​IMG]

    layout of 26dmu

    [​IMG]
     
  11. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,706
    Likes Received:
    2,996
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
  12. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,706
    Likes Received:
    2,996
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/dragonfire-new-british-laser-weapon/

    [​IMG]
    Dragonfire, the new British laser weapon
    By
    George Allison

    The UK Ministry of Defence has officially awarded a £30m contract to produce a prototype laser weapon, known as Dragonfire.

    The MoD have announced that a £30 million deal for a new British laser weapon system, for use on land and at sea, has been finalised.


    The contract was awarded to ‘UK Dragonfire’ a consortium comprising the companies MBDA, Qinetiq, Leonardo-Finmeccanica GKN, Arke, BAE Systems and Marshall ADG UK.

    According to the MoD the programme will develop technologies for a high energy defensive laser weapon system in the 50kW class.

    The Laser Directed Energy Weapon (LDEW) Capability Demonstrator is set to be built by MBDA UK Ltd and a prototype delivered by 2019.

    The prototype system will be capable of engaging representative targets in land and maritime environments in 2019. The programme will also provide the body of evidence for future procurement decisions.

    Defence Secretary Michael Fallon said:

    “The UK has long enjoyed a reputation as a world leader in innovation. Our new Innovation Initiative will transform Defence culture to ensure that we stay ahead of the curve.”

    According to the Ministry of Defence:

    “A novel laser weapon could complement or replace existing weapons systems with the potential for significant benefits. It could be employed to protect our maritime and land forces; for example, ships from threat missiles or soldiers from enemy mortars.”

    MBDA UK Ltd will assess how the system can acquire and track targets at range and in varying weather conditions over land and water, with sufficient precision to enable safe and effective engagement.

    According to MBDA in a press release:

    “UK DRAGONFIRE will achieve, through the Laser Directed Energy Weapons (DEW) Capability Demonstrator, a significant step change in the UK’s capability in High Energy Laser Weapon Systems and will provide the basis for technology-driven operational advantage. The programme will mature the key technologies for a high energy defensive laser weapon system and will include the engagement of representative targets in land and maritime environments in 2019. The programme will also provide the body of evidence for future procurement decisions.

    UK DRAGONFIRE is a collaborative consortium led MBDA with QinetiQ and Leonardo-Finmeccanica that has brought together the best of relevant UK industry expertise to deliver the highly challenging and complex programme. The team also capitalises on the strengths of the individual companies involved, which includes GKN, Arke, BAE Systems and Marshall ADG.

    This proposal builds on the significant MoD and Industry investment in the areas of laser coherent beam combining, weapon systems command and control, advanced pointing systems and high power storage.”

    Welcoming the announcement, Dave Armstrong Executive Group Director Technical and UK Managing Director of MBDA said:

    “Under MBDA lead, UK DRAGONFIRE will put the UK at the forefront of high energy laser systems, capitalising on the experience of joint MoD/Industry working in the complex weapons environment. Furthermore it advances the UK towards a future product with significant export potential, as well as providing opportunities for partnerships with other nations’ armed forces that have similar requirements.”

    Steve Wadey, QinetiQ Chief Executive Officer said:

    “This programme is a great example of companies pooling expertise to provide the MoD with the best solution. QinetiQ will provide the high-powered laser system that will be used in the test, as well as conducting the trial itself at one of the ranges we manage for the MoD as part of the Long Term Partnering Agreement.

    It’s an opportunity for us to provide innovative technology, and use our testing and evaluation expertise to ensure a successful demonstration.”

    Raytheon, a rival bidder, had showed a possible configuration with a laser and the 20mm Phalanx fitted alongside a radar and optronics. This image is shown above.

    The Royal Navy already widely uses the Phalanx across its fleet.

    The “directed energy weapon” will be able to fire high energy beams to damage and burn up targets at the cost of only pence per shot.

    This news will see Britain join the laser weapons arms race after America has already deployed a laser to the Gulf on one of its own warships.
     
  13. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,706
    Likes Received:
    2,996
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/mod-signs-146-million-contract-to-upgrade-rafs-long-range-missile

    Minister for Defence Procurement Harriett Baldwin has today announced a £146 million contract with MBDA to regenerate an air-launched missile, alongside her French counterpart Laurent Collet-Billon.

    [​IMG]
    Minister for Defence Procurement Harriett Baldwin with her French counterpart Laurent Collet-Billon at Lancaster House. Crown copyright.
    The shared deal with MDBA will see the UK’s Storm Shadow and France’s SCALP missiles updated so they remain fit for purpose and ready for operational use.

    During an inward visit by Laurent Collet-Billon, the Minister confirmed the strong partnership with France in a series of meetings at Lancaster House. The collaboration is providing a £50 million saving for both sides.

    The contract will keep the missile in service for the next decade and beyond and help to sustain around 60 UK jobs. Storm Shadow is a combat-proven, long-range, precision cruise missile, already in service with RAF Tornados, deployed recently against Daesh in Iraq.

    Minister for Defence Procurement, Harriett Baldwin said:
    Storm Shadow is a proven and vital missile for the RAF, and this £146 million upgrade will ensure it is always ready for whenever our Armed Forces might need it to defend our way of life.

    This contract is an important part of the Government’s £178 billion plan to ensure our armed forces have the right equipment at the right time.

    [​IMG]
    Defence Minister Harriett Baldwin with her French counterpart Laurent Collet-Billon. Crown Copyright.
    The midlife refurbishment programme has been developed in co-operation with the French Government who will be updating their own similar missile known as SCALP.

    By taking advantage of the similarities, this collaboration not only reaffirms the strong defence relationship as outlined under the Lancaster House Agreement, but has also resulted in a £50 million saving for both the UK and France.

    The regeneration will consist of a midlife refurbishment of current missile parts such as the turbo-jet engine, an upgrade of the navigational system, and a like for like replacement of items such as the cabling, seals and gaskets.

    The work will sustain around 60 jobs at MBDA in Stevenage and Bolton, in a variety of roles including software and systems engineering. Over 40 jobs will also be sustained through the supply chain.

    Chief Executive at the MOD’s Defence Equipment and Support Organisation, Tony Douglas said:
    The contract to regenerate Storm Shadow, a combat-proven, all-weather precision missile, provides a clear example of the MOD and UK industry working effectively together with our counter parts in France; providing our UK Armed Forces with the best equipment possible while sustaining dozens of UK jobs.

    [​IMG]
    Two Storm Shadow missiles on a Tornado GR4. Crown Copyright.
    Storm Shadow is designed to target substantial buildings and structures, such as military facilities, control centres, bunkers, missile sites, airfields and bridges, which might otherwise require the use of several aircraft over the course of numerous missions.

    France is the UK’s most important European Ally, with both countries’ defence budgets together account for almost half of all European defence spending. This deal is the most recent example of collaboration in a long history of cooperation on defence and security. The £146 million investment in Storm Shadow will sustain the missile until its planned out of service date in 2032.
     
  14. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,706
    Likes Received:
    2,996
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
  15. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,706
    Likes Received:
    2,996
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/hms-queen-elizabeth-heads-sea-trials/

    Home Sea HMS Queen Elizabeth heads to sea for trials
    [​IMG]
    HMS Queen Elizabeth heads to sea for trials
    By
    George Allison

    Supercarrier HMS Queen Elizabeth started moving early in the afternoon and was out of Rosyth Dockyard by the evening, she will soon sail for sea trials.


    The vessel will now anchor in the Firth of Forth and sail under the bridges in the hours before midnight tonight.


    The operation to move the vessel out of the basin was performed by a fleet of tugs and attracted significant public interest.

    The sea trials will monitor speed, manoeuvrability, power and propulsion as well as undertaking weapons trials and additional tests on her levels of readiness.

    Following this initial period, HMS Queen Elizabeth will return to Rosyth for further testing and maintenance before heading back to sea for a second stage which aims to test her Mission Systems. She will transit to her home port of Portsmouth Naval Base to be handed over to the Royal Navy later this year.

    Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon said:

    “This is a historic moment for the UK as our new aircraft carrier takes to sea for the very first time. This floating fortress is by far the most powerful ship ever built in Britain that will enable us to tackle multiple and changing threats across the globe.

    HMS Queen Elizabeth is an enduring example of British imagination, ingenuity, invention that will help keep us safe for decades to come. She is built by the best, crewed by the best and will deliver for Britain.

    For the next fifty years she will deploy around the world, demonstrating British power and our commitment to confronting the emerging challenges from a dangerous world. The whole country can be proud of this national achievement.”

    Admiral Sir Philip Jones First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff said:

    “This is a hugely significant moment for the Royal Navy, for all our Armed Forces and for our island nation. Once in service HMS Queen Elizabeth will be the largest aircraft carrier in the world outside the United States, and the first designed from the outset to operate a fifth generation aircraft.

    Already this ship represents the best of the UK’s industrial and engineering expertise, and once in service she will symbolise our military power and authority in the world for decades to come. There is still much work to do between now and then, but be in no doubt: a new era of British maritime power is about to begin.”


    Follow
    [​IMG]HMS Queen Elizabeth @HMSQnlz

    Thank you to all who have made this possible. Next evolution is to anchor before proceeding to pass under the Forth Bridges #QNLZatSea

    3:58 PM - 26 Jun 2017
    Twitter Ads info and privacy




    The carrier will now conduct a series of trials as she is put through her paces on the journey to become an operational warship.

    The Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers will be the largest surface warships ever constructed for the Royal Navy and will represent a significant increase in capability. The vessels will be utilised by all three branches of the UK Armed Forces and will provide eight acres of sovereign territory. Both ships will be versatile enough to be used for operations ranging from high intensity conflict to providing humanitarian aid and disaster relief.

    The class will have increased survivability as a result of the separation and distribution of power generation machinery throughout each ship. The class has been designed with twin islands, which separates the running of the ship from the flying operations resulting in greater visibility of flying operations.

    Instead of a traditional single island, the has two smaller islands. The forward island is for ship control functions and the aft (FLYCO) island is for flying control.

    The reason for two bridges is, simply put, due to the gas turbine exhausts. The design would have either had two small islands or one large, long island. The two smaller islands were chosen. The location and alignment of the islands are based around the 2.4 metre diameter gas turbine exhausts which were pre-fitted in the island and below in the ship superstructure.

    Advantages of the two island configuration are primarily increased flight deck area and reduced air turbulence. Flight control in the aft island is positioned perfectly for aircraft approaches and deck landings.

    Surprisingly for their sheer scale, each ship will only have a total crew of 679, only increasing to the full complement of 1,600 when the air elements are embarked. This is made possible by extensive automation of many systems.

    Queen Elizabeth is due to be handed over to the RN in 2017.

    She’ll begin flying training with helicopters later this year and this will be followed by F-35B jets from 2018.
     

Share This Page