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Can Modi turn India into a regional military power in the coming days?

Discussion in 'International Relations' started by HMS Astute, Nov 6, 2014.

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  1. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Can India’s Military Be Fixed?
    A reformist prime minister vs. a dysfunctional defense ministry.
    Jun 30, 2014, Vol. 19, No. 40 • By GARY SCHMITT and SADANAND DHUME

    American strategists are taken with the idea of India’s strategic potential: a large democracy with a blue-water navy and the world’s third-largest armed forces that happens to be jammed between an imploding Pakistan and an expansionist China. But a deeply dysfunctional Indian defense community has frustrated efforts to turn that potential into reality. Will the election of Prime Minister Narendra Modi last month with the strongest mandate of any Indian leader in 30 years jumpstart much-needed reforms? The answer will help determine whether India begins to fulfill its vaunted potential as a U.S. strategic partner in Asia and beyond.
    [​IMG]
    Modi in the cockpit of one of India’s aging MiGs, June 2014
    Newscom
    On the face of it, Modi’s election augurs well for India’s defense preparedness. On the campaign trail, Modi promised a strong India able to stand up to its adversaries. He deplored what he called the then-ruling Congress party’s lack of respect for soldiers, and promised to devote his government to long-overdue military modernization.
    But the list of problems he faces is a long one. The Indian defense budget has declined to less than 2 percent of the country’s GDP, the lowest in five decades. This might be tolerable if the country’s security environment had gotten appreciably better in recent years—but it hasn’t. Though India hasn’t witnessed a major terrorist strike since the carnage in Mumbai in 2008, Pakistan remains a threat, and the prospect of terrorist attacks has not gone away. As the United States draws down its troops in the region, Afghan instability is likely to be of increasing concern, and India faces on land and at sea a rapidly rising military power in China, with which the country shares a disputed 2,500-mile border
     
  2. venureddy

    venureddy Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    he is in one of the mig 29ks of indian navy which are the most recently produced mig 29s and also one of the most advanced mig-29s. i dont understand how they became aging jets soooooooo quick according to AA.
     
  3. varchasva

    varchasva 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Bro anything that is not american is either aging or junk.... :suicide:
     
  4. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    MiG-29 Misery Continues
    by James Dunnigan

    The tiny state of Moldova (east of Romania) used to be part of the Soviet Union, and inherited 31 MiG-29 fighters when it became independent in 1991. In 1997, 21 of the most modern MiG-29s were sold to the United States (for training, technical analysis and because these were advanced[​IMG] models wired to deliver nuclear weapons) for about $2 million each. Four others were sold to Yemen, for an equally low price. Now, Moldova wants to get rid of the six MiG-29s it still has. These aircraft are not in good (or flyable) shape and are being offered for the bargain price of $1 million each. A new MiG-29 can cost $40 million or more. But these 1980s era fixer uppers might be attractive to someone looking for jet fighter bargains.
    Then again, maybe not. In late 2008, Russia offered to sell Lebanon ten MiG-29 fighters, at a "large discount" (less than $5 million each). Lebanon declined. Part of the reason was the expense of keeping these aircraft operational. It costs[​IMG] about $5 million a year, per aircraft, to keep them in flying condition. Russia offers better prices on maintenance contracts for new Su-30s, mainly because the Sukhoi aircraft are more reliable and easier to maintain.
    The MiG-29 entered Russian service[​IMG] in 1983, as the answer to the American F-16. Some 1,600 MiG-29s have been produced so far, with about 900 of them exported. The 22 ton aircraft is roughly comparable to the F-16, but it depends a lot on which version of either aircraft you are talking about.
    Meanwhile, Russia is making a lot of money upgrading[​IMG] MiG-29s. Not just adding new electronics, but also making the airframe more robust. The MiG-29 was originally rated at 2,500 total flight hours. At that time (early 80s), Russia expected MiG-29s to fly about a hundred or so hours a year. India, for example, flew them at nearly twice that rate, as did Malaysia. So now Russia is offering to spiff up the airframe so that the aircraft can fly up to 4,000 hours, with more life extension upgrades promised. This won't be easy, as the MiG-29 has a history of unreliability and premature breakdowns (both mechanical and electronic). The MiG-29 has become a very unpopular aircraft.
    Several times in the past few years, Russia grounded all of its MiG-29s in order to check for structural flaws. Compared to Western aircraft, like the F-16, the MiG-29 is available for action[​IMG] about two thirds as much. While extending the life of the MiG-29 into the 2030s is theoretically possible, actually doing so will be real breakthrough in Russian aircraft capabilities. The Indians are going to take up the Russians on their upgrade offer. But the Malaysians went with the more highly regarded Su-30, and sold off their MiG-29s. Algeria, like Lebanon and several other nations, have turned down the MiG-29, which has acquired the reputation of being second rate and a loser.
     
  5. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Indian plane hits stray buffalo during take-off
    [​IMG]
    November 7, 2014 12:53 AM

    NEW DELHI (Reuters) - An Indian airliner crashed into a stray buffalo during take-off from the western city of Surat although no passengers or crew were hurt, the plane's operator, SpiceJet Ltd, said on Friday.
    The airline was forced to ground the Boeing 737 which suffered "substantial damages", it said.
    SpiceJet said the buffalo, which was killed in the accident on Thursday evening, was "essentially invisible" against a dark background. Passengers on the Delhi-bound aircraft were transferred on to another plane, SpiceJet said.
    "Stray animals are a growing menace in some airports," SpiceJet said in a statement.
    "This incident has affected our regular operations and hence SpiceJet flights from Surat will now be suspended after this incident."
    Poorly maintained fences at some Indian airports mean animals can stray onto runways.
    (Reporting by Tommy Wilkes; Editing by Robert Birsel)
     
  6. omya

    omya Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    fuuking americunts obsessed with india.... good goooood
     
  7. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Buffalo, just thought the idea of buffalos wandering around airports where Boeing 737s are landing was interesting.
     
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