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China can destroy the F-22 in eight different ways

Discussion in 'China & Asia Pacific' started by Martian, Jan 31, 2016.

  1. Martian

    Martian Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    1. China can detonate a megaton-class thermonuclear weapon 100 miles above the surface. The EMP is equivalent to tasering every microchip in the F-22 with 50,000 volts.

    2. China can use ballistic and cruise missiles to destroy the oil tanks on the seven US bases in the Pacific. Without fuel, an F-22 can't fly.

    3. China can shoot down the KC-135 tankers that are necessary to refuel the short-legged F-22, which has a combat radius of only 435 nautical miles. Without air refueling, the F-22 cannot venture beyond 535 nautical miles including fuel drop-tanks.

    4. China can use ballistic and cruise missile cluster bombs to destroy the runway. Without a runway, an F-22 can't take off or land.

    5. China can destroy the repair and maintenance facilities for the F-22. Without the elaborate and meticulous repairs to the F-22's 600-pound stealth coating, the F-22 is not stealthy.

    6. Using the Chinese KJ-2000 AWACS and KJ-200 AEW&C L-band anti-stealth radars, stealthy J-20s and J-31s can intercept F-22s.

    7. Using Chinese ground-based anti-stealth radars (including circular polarization, VHF, or UHF), SAMs can be guided to shoot down F-22s.

    8. China is working on the Anjian (ie. Dark Sword) supersonic stealth UCAV, which can maneuver at 12-15Gs. The Anjian should be able to outmaneuver and shoot down the F-22.

    In conclusion, China has a myriad of methods to destroy the F-22.
     
    Zeus_@21 likes this.
  2. Zeus_@21

    Zeus_@21 Major SENIOR MEMBER

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  3. Flyboy!

    Flyboy! Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    someones smoking weed on a cold sunday morning.
     
  4. randomradio

    randomradio Colonel REGISTERED

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    Can we have more information about this UCAV?
     
  5. Flyboy!

    Flyboy! Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    either its a total secret or a big scam
     
  6. The Drdo Guy

    The Drdo Guy Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Had it been so easy they would have done it. All the points emphasis more on how F22 will not fly than how they take down F22 in air warfare. If a war really broke out between US Vs China, it will be most likely world war three and US will do everything to ensure that its F22 are flying. J20/31 etc are just chinese toys and will be tested when time comes. And regarding that UCAV doing 15g, it needs an ENGINE which china don't have uptill now and won't have in near future. So, the conclusion is this is written by some Chinese jingo and not a defence planner. We have youtube flodded with videos of jf17 killing F22.
     
  7. surya kiran

    surya kiran 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    first you need to know which direction they are coming from. Then you need to know where they are coming from. You attack a base, you attack the country which has that base. Stop talking like a Pakistani. You Chinese are too smart to get into a direct military war with the Americans.
     
  8. venureddy

    venureddy Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    doesnt that mean the end of china?? detonating a nuke to kill americans,attacking US military bases etc... all the above mentioned scenarios will force US to an all out war. dont say that china has nukes. US has much more nukes than china will ever have. you can imagine all the things you want if that is legally allowed in china and if does not put you under investigation(arrest) but we all know they just dont make sense.
     
  9. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Americans have been living under the shadow of nuclear destruction for 80 years, we are use to it, most americans I know attitude, is if you attack us with nuclear weapons we are going to do our level best to destroy you ever if it destroys us in the process.
     
  10. venureddy

    venureddy Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    i agree with you
     
  11. Martian

    Martian Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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  12. Martian

    Martian Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    China has unveiled two sub-sonic stealth drones. The supersonic stealth Dark Sword is the next logical evolutionary UAV.

    Lijian (Sharp Sword): stealthy sub-sonic UAV bomber
    Tian Yi 2 (Sky Wing 2): stealthy sub-sonic reconnaissance UAV
    Anjian (Dark Sword): stealthy supersonic UCAV fighter

    China's Lijian and Tian Yi 2 Stealth Drones

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  13. venureddy

    venureddy Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    martian what about the Lijian UAV?? will it also get a flat nozzle engine like tian yi2?? in the above pic we can clearly see the round engine exhaust nozzle .
     
  14. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Building a drone is easy, its operating them that is hard.

    We do it a lot.

    [​IMG]

    Alamy
    [​IMG]
    Dave Majumdar


    Malfunction
    01.04.15 8:30 PM ET

    Exclusive: U.S. Drone Fleet at ‘Breaking Point,’ Air Force Says
    Too many missions and too few pilots are threatening the ‘readiness and combat capability’ of America’s unmanned Air Force, according to an internal memo.
    The U.S. Air Force’s fleet of drones is being strained to the “breaking point,” according to senior military officials and an internal service memo acquired by The Daily Beast. And it’s happening right when the unmanned aircraft are most needed to fight ISIS.

    The Air Force has enough MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper drones. It just doesn’t have the manpower to operate those machines. The Air Force’s situation is so dire that Air Combat Command (ACC), which trains and equips the service’s combat forces, is balking at filling the Pentagon’s ever increasing demands for more drone flights.

    “ACC believes we are about to see a perfect storm of increased COCOM [Combatant Commander] demand, accession reductions, and outflow increases that will damage the readiness and combat capability of the MQ-1/9 enterprise for years to come,” reads an internal Air Force memo from ACC commander Gen. Herbert “Hawk” Carlisle, addressed to Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Welsh. “I am extremely concerned.”

    “ACC will continue to non-concur to increased tasking beyond our FY15 [fiscal year 2015] force offering and respectfully requests your support in ensuring the combat viability of the MQ-1/9 platform,” Carlisle added.

    In other words, the Air Force is saying that its drone force has been stretched to its limits. “It’s at the breaking point, and has been for a long time,” a senior service official told The Daily Beast. “What’s different now is that the band-aid fixes are no longer working.”

    In the internal memo, Carlisle noted that the Air Force’s current manning problem is so acute that the service will have to beg the Pentagon to reconsider its demand for 65 drone combat air patrols, or CAPs, as early as April 2015. (Each CAP, also known as an “orbit,” consists on four aircraft.)


    But senior military leaders in the Pentagon have been pushing back hard against any reduction in the number of drone orbits, particularly as demand has surged in recent months over Iraq and Syria because of the war against ISIS. In fact, the Pentagon is so fervent in its demand for more Predator and Reaper patrols that the top military brass made an end run to bypass regular channels to increase the number of drone orbits, the ACC alleges.

    “The reduced offering of 62 CAPs (plus a 60-day Global Response Force) has been submitted to the Joint Staff; however, the Joint Staff has indicated their desire to circumvent normal processes while proposing their own offering of 65 MQ-1/9 CAPs,” Carlisle wrote. “This simply is not an option for ACC to source indeterminately.”

    Carlisle writes that the Air Force would want a crew ratio of 10 to one for each drone orbit during normal everyday operations. During an emergency that ratio could be allowed to drop to 8.5 people per orbit. However, the Air Force is so strapped for people that the ratio has dropped below even that reduced level.

    “ACC squadrons are currently executing steady-state, day-to-day operations (65 CAPs) at less than an 8:1 crew-to-CAP ratio. This directly violates our red line for RPA [remotely pilot aircraft] manning and combat operations,” Carlisle wrote. “The ever-present demand has resulted in increased launch and recovery taskings and increased overhead for LNO [liaison officer] support.”

    The Air Force has been forced to raid its schools for drone operators to man the operational squadrons that are flying combat missions over places like Iraq and Syria. As a result, training squadrons—called Formal Training Units (FTU)—are being staffed with less than half the people they need. Even the Air Force’s elite Weapons School—the service’s much more extensive and in-depth version of the Navy’s famous Top Gun school—course for drone pilots was suspended in an effort to train new rookie operators.

    Overworked drone crews have had their leaves canceled and suffered damage to their careers because they could not attend required professional military education courses.

    The result is that drone operators are leaving the Air Force in droves. “Pilot production has been decimated to match the steady demand placed upon the RPA community by keeping ‘all hands’ in the fight,” Carlisle wrote. “Long-term effects of this continued OPSTEMPO are manifested in declining retention among MQ-1/9 pilots, FTU manning at less than 50%, and enterprise-wide pilot manning hovering at about 84%.”

    The Air Force has about seven pilots for every eight drone pilot slots, in other words.

    But it takes more than just pilots to operate the drone fleet. In addition to the pilots who “fly” the MQ-1s and MQ-9s, there are sensor operators who work the cameras and other intelligence-gathering hardware onboard the unmanned aircraft. Further, there are maintenance crews who have to fix those drones. Perhaps most crucially, drones require hundreds of intelligence analysts who have to comb through thousands of hours of video surveillance footage to understand what the flight crews are watching.

    “Some have looked at this as a problem with just RPA pilots and the number of them required for these CAPs, but that ignores the tail required for supporting RPA operations,” a senior Air Force official said. “This tail requires hundreds of man-hours to support every hour of flight in forward operations, maintenance, and most starkly in the processing, exploitation, and dissemination of the intelligence that RPAs create.”

    The problem for Carlisle and the Air Force is that even as the demand increases on the drone fleet, fewer new troops enter the ranks while more and more veteran operators vote with their feet.
     
  15. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Military 637 drones Air Force 737 drones Navy 36 drones Marines 52 drones Department of Homeland Security 9plus drones Central Intelligence Agency 30plus drones Unreported Drones 5,500 drones Total estimate: 7,000+ drones Department of Defense Military Air Force Navy Marine Corps Size of the U.S. Fleet: We have more drones then most countries air forces have planes.


    Size Some Additional Considerations: A Global Hawk costs approximately $30,000 per flight hour—on par with stealth fighter jets. Surveillance drones operated on the U.S.-Mexican border cost between $2,500 and$3,500 per flight hour. Each drone requires an hour of maintenance for every hour it spends in the air. Each Predator and Reaper drone (our most common strike drones) requires a team of 180 people to operate properly. The cost of producing a military drone ranges from $100,000 to hundreds of millions of dollars. Over the next decade, the Pentagon plans to spend $40 billion on medium-to-large sized drones.
     

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