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China–Pakistan Economic Corridor : News & Discussions

Discussion in 'South Asia & SAARC' started by Agent_47, Nov 16, 2016.

  1. Inactive

    Inactive Guest

    Sighting Land
    Khurram Husain

    Two weeks ago, I wrote a piece about the special economic zones planned under the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor in which I drew attention to a news item that had come and gone largely unnoticed in which officials of the Planning Commission were quoted telling the Senate Committee on Planning and Development that “only Chinese investors will be allowed to invest in these SEZs”.

    That article drew a sharp response from the Planning Commission and Miftah Ismael, special assistant to the prime minister who is heading the Joint Working Group on Industrial Cooperation, called me to give a lengthy and detailed rebuttal, saying no such exclusivity will be allowed. As a journalist I feel duty-bound to convey the contents of the responses I received, but must also add that these were not the only people who got in touch with me after that article appeared.

    So let’s start with the government version. The Planning Commission sent a written response saying the article was “concocted and baseless, reported to mislead the masses”. They “condemned such distorted stories, appeared to be part of a campaign to malign the government efforts for development and economic prosperity of Pakistan”.

    They claimed that a process to establish SEZs under CPEC had only just begun, and “t is nowhere explicitly stated that only Chinese companies can invest in all SEZ”. Miftah Ismael went a step further, saying he would never acquiesce to such a request if the Chinese ever put one up, emphasising that even the Chinese side has not requested exclusive access.

    What will really happen once the SEZs are ready is something that will only be known by its effects.

    Fair enough. If the government side wants to stake out such a strong and unequivocal position on such an important matter, their view deserves to be known. But the chairman of the committee, Senator Tahir Mashaddi, continues to strongly say that the government delegation before his committee did indeed say what was attributed to them in the news report, adding that there was even a lengthy discussion on the matter after their remarks. “They often do this,” he tells me. “They often back away from things they say during these hearings afterwards”. The reporter who covered the hearing also strongly stands by what he reported, saying that he definitely heard the delegation say what was attributed to them.

    So let’s get past this verbal impasse. If the government wants to today strongly emphasise that they will not negotiate exclusivity for Chinese investors in these SEZs, let’s take them at their word. After all, with time all will become clear, although hopefully by then it will not be too late.

    The thing is, this is Pakistan, and the age-old adage that used to be said about the game of poker applies very well here: look around the table, if you can’t figure out who the sucker is, it’s you. In this country, the rules of the game are rigged long before they have been written down. Winners and losers are preselected before the game even begins. So what will really happen once these SEZs are ready is something that will only be known by its effects, not by the rules negotiated by any working group.

    The point to note is this: thus far the country’s CPEC conversation has revolved around the question of routes, which province is receiving the largest share of the investment, and the financial terms on which this investment is coming in. But now it is moving into a new area: land.

    Land is what this country is fundamentally about. Land is where the rubber meets the road. In my last column I gave the example of Sri Lanka, where things went wrong in a couple of large projects and their debts proved too burdensome for that country’s economy to manage. The penalty that Sri Lanka had to pay was land, swapped along with operational control of the port, in exchange for the debt that they could no longer service.

    Since then I have learned that such examples are numerous. Tajikistan gorged itself on Chinese investment with much fanfare more than a decade ago. There too the arrival of the Chinese was hailed as a ‘game changer’ when the enterprise got under way. By 2009 or so, they had difficulty meeting their debt-service obligations. So they asked for some relief from the burdensome terms.

    And you know what they had to give up in exchange for this relief? Land.

    In 2011, the government of Tajikistan announced that they had just concluded a deal with the government of China, ceding control of 1,100 square kilometres of mountainous land to the Chinese under the garb of settling a centuries-old border dispute. The agreement had been reached in 1999, but finalised precisely at a time when Tajikistan’s debt difficulties began. The territory represents one per cent of the country’s total land area.

    At the time, more than a third of the country’s total external debt was owed to China. By 2010, the year before the land deal, some 82,000 Chinese were working in Tajikistan, up from less than half that in 2007. The land that was ceded is now being tilled by Chinese farmers.

    We have much to learn from Central Asia’s experience where Chinese investment has played a very positive role in building infrastructure. But the authoritarian nature of the regimes there meant very little of the growing collaboration was done with any transparency, and once the costs of the deals began to assert themselves, one of the instruments of settlement was land.

    So now that Pakistan and China are at the ‘inception stage’ of a process to negotiate the creation of SEZs, and their associated infrastructure and raw material requirements, it is worth bearing in mind that the game is becoming very serious indeed. Nothing summons up the animal instincts of our economy quite like land does, and now that a party as large as the Chinese government is poised to enter that field, extreme care must be taken. Let nothing be agreed to in the dark.

    https://www.dawn.com/news/1322243/sighting-land

    @VCheng looks like someone reads you/follows you or shares your thoughts.

    Or is you???:cheesy:
     
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  2. Nilgiri

    Nilgiri Lieutenant GEO STRATEGIC ANALYST

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    Didn't know about the Tajikistan experience. Interesting.
     
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  3. Inactive

    Inactive Guest

    It sits very well with the Chinese philosophy of maintaining a 'leverage' to achieve 'strategic' objectives. And it was under Mongol occupation, and as per Chinese philosophy ... Mongols were Chinese at the end of their rule!! :D
     
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  4. nair

    nair Die hard Romeo Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    Now it is time for learning Pakistani experience.....
     
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  5. lca-fan

    lca-fan Captain FULL MEMBER

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    China ready to take CPEC forward with Pakistan: spokesperson

    BEIJING: A Chinese foreign affairs ministry spokesperson on Friday said Beijing is ready to work with Islamabad to move forward the multi-billion China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) to benefit the people of the two countries.

    “The CPEC is a new cooperation framework set up by China and Pakistan to pursue long-term development. It is also an important project of the Belt and Road Initiative,” Chinese FO Spokesperson Hua Chunying said during a press briefing.

    Pakistan, China revise ‘priority list’ of CPEC energy projects

    “China stands ready to work with Pakistan to move forward the CPEC so as to benefit the two peoples at an early date,” she said.

    Hua Chunying maintained that it was important, not only in promoting common development for China and Pakistan but also in promoting regional connectivity, development and prosperity of regional countries.

    In advancing the CPEC, both Pakistan and China had adhered to the principle of extensive consultation, joint contribution and shared benefits, the Chinese official added. She said the dividends and benefits brought by CPEC would be shared by people in China and Pakistan and in the region.

    Responding to a question, the spokesperson rejected apprehensions that once the CPEC trade routes officially opened, Pakistan will be flooded with cheap Chinese products, which would make it hard for local Pakistani companies to survive.

    At the invitation of the Pakistani military, honour guards of the three services of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army had sent a formation to march in the military parade marking Pakistan Day, she said.

    Pakistan will be paying China $90b against CPEC-related projects

    Hua Chunying added, “In 2015, Pakistan sent a formation to take part in China’s military parade celebrating the 70th anniversary of the victory of the Chinese People’s War of Resistance against Japanese aggression and the World Anti-Fascist War.”

    “China and Pakistan are all-weather strategic cooperative partners, and the Chinese and the Pakistani military maintain a traditional friendship,” continued the Chinese spokesperson.

    Joining the Pakistani side in its military parade this time was another vivid testament to the epitome of the high-level strategic mutual trust and friendly relations between the two countries and their militaries, the Chinese FO spokesperson added.

    https://tribune.com.pk/story/1365218/china-ready-take-cpec-forward-pakistan-spokesperson/

    Pakistan will be paying China $90b against CPEC-related projects :award::award:
     
  6. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Pakistan’s dream corridor is going to burn a hole in its pocket, and then some
    Published March 26, 2017
    SOURCE: DAILY O

    [​IMG]

    For Pakistan, it was a dream come true. When Chinese President Xi Jinping visited Islamabad in April 2015, he pledged a whopping Rs 3,00,894 crore for the China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC). While the mega project was a vital element of the One Belt, One Road (OBOR) for Beijing, it was a “game-changer” for Pakistan, as it would bring prosperity to the entire region.

    It’s true that Xi brought with him munificent gifts for Pakistan: the Chinese billions would boost Pakistan’s flagging economy with massive energy and infrastructure projects. This included an additional 12,000 megawatts to Pakistan’s national grid through coal, hydro and renewable energy projects. The Corridor would have railways, roads, optical fibre cables, dams, pipelines, you name it! Though observers marvelled Beijing’s generosity (and wealth), but lately, the “beneficiaries” have started realising that the project may first and foremost benefit Beijing!

    Security

    The architects of CPEC plan to build a 2,700km corridor stretching from Kashgar to Gwadar, which will link Central Asia (via Xinjiang) to Europe and Africa (via the maritime route).

    Is it a boon for Islamabad? Not everyone agrees, even in Pakistan. Salman Rafi Sheikh, a research analyst wrote in Asia Times: “The CPEC continues to look like a mystery. In the absence of agreements stipulating and documenting both countries’ interests, the CPEC is creating problems that would strip Pakistan of benefits the multi-billion-dollar project promises. Claims about CPEC’s ability to change Pakistan’s economic outlook appear hollow and unreal. The question is — what’s the game changer for the region when CPEC is changing nothing in Pakistan?”

    The author certainly has a point. It’s true that the Corridor faces several serious issues, security for example. Now, suppose the scheme becomes “unstable” due to terrorism (presently localised in Pakistan, but which can be easily exported to Xinjiang), the cost of the project could tremendously shoot up. This deeply worries Beijing.

    Last month, The Dawn reported that Pakistan has deployed 15,000 military personnel, “as part of the Special Security Division (SSD) and Maritime Security Force (MSF) to protect projects under the CPEC”. Senator Mushahid Hussain Sayed, chairman of the Parliamentary Committee on CPEC, noted: “Both forces will work under the interior ministry, in coordination with the provinces.”

    The question is, who is going to pay the bill? Quoting military sources,The South China Morning Post affirms that the PLA would soon increase its fighting force to 100,000 personnel, “allowing for deployment in Djibouti in the Horn of Africa and Gwadar in southwest Pakistan.” Chinese troops in Gwadar, the main entry to the CPEC, is worrisome, to say the least.

    Recently Pakistan’s Public Accounts Committee asked for the details of rate of interest for the loans obtained from China. The secretary of the Ministry of Water and Power gave some figures: there were 19 power projects under the CPEC with the capacity of 12,114 MW; out of which 3,960 MW from coal, 2,714 MW from hydro projects, 900 MW from solar projects and 4,260 MW from imported coal.

    Economy

    The amazing part is that after the COP21 accords, the planet is abandoning coal, but China is financing new coal projects in Pakistan with Chinese coal!

    Beijing has agreed to provide a Rs 39,250 crore loan for road infrastructure and Rs 2.8 billion for Railways “on the lowest interest rate”. While these loans are at a reasonable 1.6 per cent interest, in some other cases, the interest can be as high as six or seven per cent. Will Pakistan be able to repay these loans?

    By including the cost of insurance, also paid to a Chinese insurance company, the cost of borrowings could surge to 13 per cent. “Adding insult to injury, the government has already exempted income of Chinese financial institutions from dividend income tax,” said The Pakistan Herald.

    Another issue is regional disparity. On February 28, Sardar Akhtar Jan Mengal, president of the Balochistan National Party-Mengal (BNP-M), accused Islamabad of getting funds for the project in the name of Gwadar while using them in one province only, Punjab. Mengal argued that the people of Balochistan, a province through which a major portion of the Corridor passes, have neither been consulted nor taken into confidence on CPEC projects. Other provinces, particularly Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (for the western route of CPEC) and Gilgit-Baltistan have similar views.

    Legality

    As the project crosses Indian territory in PoK, the CPEC is unacceptable for India. Delhi cannot pretend that nothing is happening and forget about the legality of the accession of Jammu and Kashmir to India. Beijing has hinted that India should join the “global” project, but China doesn’t seem to be ready to implement what it is preaching.

    After Tibet was invaded by China in October 1950, the traditional Himalayan trade routes were closed down. An effort was made in 1954 to regulate the flow of people and goods through the “Agreement on Trade and Intercourse between the Tibet region of China and India” — the Panchsheel Agreement — but, China wasn’t ready to implement the letter or the spirit of the Agreement which lapsed in 1962.

    While China is adamant to not reopen the Himalayan land ports between India and Tibet, why “invite” Delhi to join the CPEC bandwagon? There is no logic.

    In any case, the Corridor is first and foremost a vital investment for Beijing, which is slowly “buying” the strategic corridor; Beijing will soon control its new dominion, Pakistan. For India, it will be a game changer as it will then face China on two fronts, the northern and the western ones. Modi sarkar should ponder about this.

    http://idrw.org/pakistans-dream-corridor-is-going-to-burn-a-hole-in-its-pocket-and-then-some/
     
  7. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    CPEC Our Insurance Policy against any possible Indian aggression : Pak Media
    Published March 25, 2017
    SOURCE: DAILY TIMES PK

    [​IMG]

    At the very outset, I would like to give credit to the Pakistan’s military strategists, who I have criticised more often in my writings. Back in 2012 while doing my background interviews for my book I was told by a serving general that Pakistan would have to make a choice between the US and the China bloc soon in the future than it was earlier expected.’ Of course, the general was talking about the strategic alliance which though existed for many decades but still Pakistan was considered to be America’s policeman for the region particularly since 1954.

    I did not argue with him that why Pakistan cannot have peaceful coexistence with its neighbours and declare itself as a neutral country in the tug-of-war at the international theatre.

    So, when President Zardari signed off Gwadar to China towards the fag end of his term in 2013, it was no surprise to me. This has given China access to the Indian Ocean and easier connection to Central Asia and Iran. One of the most important projects of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) is the building of a motorway from Gwadar to the Chinese Xinjiang province via the Karakoram Highway. It would be the shortest route to connect western China with the seaport. Gwadar is sitting on the door of the Persian Gulf which is the major oil route. It is the major success of China’s maritime geostrategic policy.

    And equally, it was also no surprise that the present government signed off the CPEC agreement on the dotted line without negotiating a better deal for Pakistan. Now when the euphoria about CPEC agreement is mellowing down, reports have started coming in that in the long-term Pakistan will have to pay heavily for not guarding its interests.

    For unexplainable reasons, the government has kept confidential the information regarding the financial structuring of the various projects being undertaken under the CPEC agreement. But what has leaked out is the fact that the power projects would be given 17 percent return on equity and that the loan by the China Development Bank would be at the rate of 6 to 7 percent, which is much higher than what we could get from the multilateral agencies. At the same time, the government has waived the condition to call for competitive bidding.

    The deal about constructions of the four economic corridors is being kept shrouded in secrecy. There are many questions which are being legitimately raised regarding y don’t know the financial structuring of these infrastructure projects including what would be the equity of Pakistan for of the land acquired by it for these motorway projects; what would be the Chinese investment and it would be done through which companies; how the cost of these projects would be met; would they be on the basis of build-operate-and-transfer; what kind of toll tax has been envisaged by the government.

    Those who support the CPEC deal have a simple answer: ‘beggars are not choosers’. Their logic is also simple that Pakistan needed investment in the power sector and communication infrastructure and China which is a dear friend was the only one willing to give it. To some extent that is true. All the Chinese investment is going to add the creation of goods and services which will ultimately reflect on the growth of GDP. But the fact that the Chinese have been given a tax holiday and many other such facilities may ultimately not bring the desired benefit to Pakistan’s economy and the people at large. The taste of the benefits of this investment agreement should be ultimately judged against how much benefit it will accrue to the people of Pakistan in terms of the rise in per capita income and employment.

    For China, it serves its ‘One Belt One Road’ policy as it wanted to expand its influence in the West of the country. For Pakistan, it is also more than an economic deal. It is an attempt to create deeper strategic interests of China in the country to counter the growing India-US strategic axis.

    One of the major reasons of strong China-Pakistan relations is thus the latter’s geostrategic position, although the common border between the two countries is only 523 km. Pakistan, a weaker and smaller state compared to its declared adversary (India) needed support to balance its standing with India.

    Some of the primary reasons for stable relations with China are: first because the Chinese have always been patient with Pakistan; second, they do not interfere in the tumultuous domestic politics of Pakistan; and third, they see Pakistan as a counter-balancing force to India.

    Pakistan-China relations were best explained recently by an authentic 2012 National Defense University (NDU) report as following, “Pakistan-China relationship is unique and enduring. Both countries have a different belief system yet the friendship is bound by a high level of trust. It has matured into a comprehensive partnership at multiple levels, especially in the political and security domains. While it is recognised to be of crucial importance for the National Security of Pakistan, it is of equal significance in the regional security considerations of Beijing. The defining moments in the Pakistan-China relationship can be traced back to 1956, the year of first high-level visits and 1963 Trans-Karakoram Tract Treaty.” (My emphasis)

    The Chinese support during Pakistan-India 1965 war was the real turning point. The Pakistani establishment was pretty disappointed with the US which had stopped military supplies on the ground that Pakistan had violated its undertaking that arms given to it will not be used against India.

    During the 1971 Pakistan-India war, China again supported Pakistan. It blamed that India had interfered in the domestic affairs of Pakistan. China “continued to supply military equipment under existing agreements and extended political support to the Pakistan position in the United Nations.

    Thus, for Pakistan CPEC is not only of economic importance, as the name suggests, but it is also an assurance that the world’s second-biggest economic power would support it against any possible Indian aggression. The fast-growing strategic dialogue between the US and India is further pushing Pakistan in the China camp.

    http://idrw.org/cpec-our-insurance-policy-against-any-possible-indian-aggression-pak-media/
     
  8. OverLoad

    OverLoad Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    The Pakistani government and Army have assured Beijing that they will do everything possible to ensure the CPEC is completed.

    [​IMG]
    Prime Minister Narendra Modi with his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping. (Photo: AP)
    Beijing: With China planning to invest billions of yuan in constructing railways, waterways and highways as part of its giant One Belt One Road, or OBOR, global initiative, New Delhi is evaluating whether it should join a conference planned in Beijing next month on the Chinese project.

    India is “yet to take a view on this”, given its reservations on the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor running through Pakistan-Occupied Kashmir, said a person in the government with direct knowledge of the matter. The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor is believed to be a part of or linked to the OBOR concept.

    Yet, South Block is not oblivious to the economic benefits of connectivity in other corridors which are set to be part of OBOR.

    For instance, connectivity along a corridor linking China, Bangladesh, Myanmar and India could bring immense trade benefits to the “underdeveloped” states in India’s north-east. But New Delhi is wary since OBOR will certainly boost Chinese influence globally and not just in India’s immediate neighbourhood.

    The proposed OBOR comprises two corridors, one on land, and the other maritime. The land corridors will be part of the Silk Road Economic Belt, or SREB, with corridors through central, west and south Asia which will link China with Europe.

    The SREB is coined on the ancient Silk Road through which successive Chinese empires traded with the Romans who greatly prized silk, then the premium Chinese product.

    The SREB will forge China’s links with western Europe through central Asia and Russia, and with the Mediterranean through west Asia. It will also ensure access to the Indian Ocean through the much shorter land route via Pakistan that passes through PoK, culminating in the port of Gwadar in Pakistan’s restive Balochistan province.

    But problems remain even in execution of the CPEC. Officials of the state-owned China Communications Constr-uction Co. Ltd told this newspaper in Beijing that they are facing a “safety problem in Pakistan”; however, the Pakistani government was providing them “special security”.

    “Safety in Pakistan is always on our mind but it is not the biggest challenge we have faced,” said a company official who did not want to be named.

    The Pakistani government and Army have assured Beijing that they will do everything possible to ensure the CPEC is completed.

    India has opposed the CPEC on the grounds that it passes through PoK, which is sovereign Indian territory under the illegal occupation of Islamabad.

    But China is only too aware of India’s thirst for rapid development, a promise that the Narendra Modi government has given to the Indian electorate.

    China has built entire cities in the hinterland out of nowhere, including its technological marvels such as the Beijing-Shanghai bullet train and a 32-km-long bridge over the East China Sea connecting Shanghai to an island where a port is being built.

    The OBOR is the brainchild of Chinese President Xi Jinping who reportedly first outlined the concept in Kazakhstan in September 2013, and then in Indonesia in October 2013.

    The second part of the OBOR project comprises sea routes connecting China with south-east Asia and onward to Africa, supplemented by rail and road networks for which Beijing has heavily invested in Africa.

    India, which is also uneasy about Chinese presence in the Indian Ocean and in some nations — apart from Pakistan — in the region, which include Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, the Maldives and even land-locked Nepal, has its own deep engagement with the Asean nations in south-east Asia and the African continent as part of the India-Africa Forum Summit initiative.

    The growing Chinese military presence in the Indian Ocean region and constant movement of Chinese submarines have also unnerved New Delhi.

    Dragon breathes fire
    China plans to invest billions of yuan in One Belt One Road (OBOR) global initiative
    OBOR comprises railways, waterways and highways projects
    India is wary since OBOR will boost Chinese influence globally
    OBOR comprises two corridors: One on land, and the other maritime
    Land corridors part of Silk Road Economic Belt, which will link China with Europe
    Second part of OBOR comprises sea routes connecting China with south-east Asia and onward to Africa

    http://www.asianage.com/india/all-india/030417/chinas-infrastructure-push-worries-india.html
     
  9. OverLoad

    OverLoad Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    India must shed CPEC concerns after UK’s endorsement: The Hindu

    With the United Kingdom endorsing the $46-billion China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), India should shed its concerns over it and sign-up for the Silk Road project, state media in Beijing said on Friday.

    “The U.K. is poised to be a key partner of CPEC” and will host a conference in Islamabad in May, an article in the state-run Global Times said. “The news offers a positive signal that the CPEC has received an increasing amount of attention from developed economies.”

    ‘U.K. to be key partner’

    The U.K.’s International Trade Minister Greg Hands held a roundtable with leading British businesses, policy experts and senior representatives of the Chinese and Pakistani governments earlier this week.

    “The U.K. is poised to be a key partner of the CPEC,” an official British government statement said in an endorsement of the project even though it goes through the Gilgit and Baltistan area of the Azad Kashmir (Azad Kashmir) over which India has protested.

    “New Delhi is yet to sign up for the Belt & Road (Silk Road) initiative and has claimed that the CPEC violates its sovereignty because it passes through Azad Kashmir,” the Global Times article said.

    China’s huge CPEC investment

    “China’s enormous investment in the CPEC has become an inharmonious factor in Sino-Indian ties. However, it would be unwise to think that increasing investment in the CPEC means a lack of respect for India’s sovereignty,” it said.

    The article said that such ideas could lead to unnecessary opposition between India and the West as developed countries show an increased interest in the CPEC and China’s Belt and Road (B&R) initiative.

    “The CPEC is simply an economic project. Beijing has no intention to use to the B&R initiative to recognise any geopolitical spheres of influence. Hopefully China’s open mind towards cooperation on the B&R initiative can help dispel misgivings held by India and some other countries,” it said.

    There is great potential for developed economies, like the U.K., to join CPEC and other projects in B&R initiative, it has said.

    “China is likely to welcome enterprises from the U.K. and other developed nations to participate in construction of the CPEC, which has long been seen a flagship project in the B&R initiative,” the article said.

    Platform for China

    The B&R initiative not only provides a platform for China and countries along the route to enhance cooperation, but also adheres to the principle of openness and inclusiveness in global economic development, it has said.

    Currently, China is encouraging wider participation from developed economies in the initiative, it said.

    In March, New Zealand signed a cooperation agreement with China on the B&R initiative, a first for Western developed countries.

    A B&R initiative summit, to be held in Beijing in May, will also provide an opportunity to enhance cooperation between China and developed countries, the article said.

    Pak luring investors?

    The steady development of the CPEC has made Pakistan more attractive to foreign investment, it has claimed.

    Some Western developed countries, as the traditional foreign trade partners of many emerging economies along the B&R initiative, have a clear intent to increase trade with those countries, Pakistan included, it said.

    Additionally, Pakistan’s nuclear power sector and other high-tech industries are also likely to gain more opportunities if developed economies participate in the construction of the CPEC, the article said.
    http://www.thehindu.com/news/intern...-endorsement-global-times/article17867830.ece
    Edit:Title
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 8, 2017
  10. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    @OverLoad

    The report is from PTI quoting Global Times not from The Hindu.

    Don't modify title to promote your agenda.
     
  11. An Indian

    An Indian FULL MEMBER

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    To put it politely - what BULLSHIT!!!! What the pakistani think UK does is their problem, not ours... Your baby, your funeral - sorry burial...
     
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  12. SrNair

    SrNair Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    What UK is doing in there or somewhere is none of our business.
    Nor we dont have any issues with development of Pakistan ,but when you chose a disputed territory for your project ,then we are not going to accept it .Whether you likes or not .
    And Chinese knows ,no matter whereever they seek support for this project ,it wont fulfill its objectives until India allow to do so .This is our turf .
    And we knows how to handle this issues.
     
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  13. Butter Chicken

    Butter Chicken 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    CPEC provided ZERO benefit to India.
     
  14. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    India has to kill CPEC asap, It is going to be a biggest headache on its own. Cross border terrorism would be nothing compared to it.
     
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  15. An Indian

    An Indian FULL MEMBER

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    All this talk reminds me of those singin' & dancin' nautankis traveling from village to village. They usually have a decked up monkey who dances and you throw a bit of money to them...

    On a personal basis - I WANT the CPEC to happen. It is a quick way for Pakistan to turn into a vassal of China (think of the vast loans that the pakistani have to pay China which they can never pay back). Then the whole mess there turns into a Chinese headache. And they are very good at curing their own headaches - think Urghur Islamic militancy. And no, I don't want the POK back - it is filled up with those Wahabi Sunnis and merging them back will pollute the Indian ethos.
     

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