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China's Advanced Sciences

Discussion in 'China & Asia Pacific' started by Martian, Apr 16, 2010.

  1. Martian

    Martian Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Rocket to go to moon under design

    The following impressive video is a successful 200-second rocket-engine burn of the forthcoming 2014 Long March V. Having completed this milestone, the talented rocket scientists have moved on to designing and building the final heavy-lift rocket engine that will carry Chinese taikonauts to the moon.



    Rocket to go to moon under design

    "Rocket to go to moon under design
    By Xin Dingding (China Daily)
    Updated: 2010-03-05 07:26

    BEIJING: A new heavy-thrust carrier rocket is under scientific research, with the goal of sending astronauts to the moon, scientists said.

    [​IMG]
    A model of the Long March V rocket

    Although there is no official timetable yet for China's moon landing, scientists are researching a new powerful carrier rocket with a lift-off thrust of 3,000 tons, Liang Xiaohong, vice-president of the China Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology, told China Daily on Thursday.

    "The heavy-thrust launcher's lift-off thrust will be three times that of the Long March-5
    , China's current largest launcher," said Liang, who is also a member of the 11th CPPCC national committee.

    The large-thrust Long March-5 launch vehicle has a lift-off thrust of 1,000 tons, which enables it to send a maximum payload of 25 tons to the near-Earth orbit and a payload of 10 tons to the higher geo-stationary orbit. Designed for transporting heavyweight satellites and space stations, it is slated to take off in 2014, according to Liang.

    Compared to the Long March-5, the heavy-thrust launcher will be more powerful, but its payload capacity is still under discussion, he said.

    The Long March-5 is also likely to be used in the preparatory stage of a future moon landing, he added.

    China is currently studying the feasibility of a moon landing, despite US President Barack Obama's decision to kill NASA's $100-billion plans to return astronauts to the moon.

    Bao Weimin, an academician with the Chinese Academy of Sciences and a CPPCC national committee member, said: "A moon landing program is very necessary, because it could drive the country's scientific and technological development."

    Besides the heavy-thrust carrier rocket under study, the academy is also developing a new family of carrier rockets for future space programs.

    "The Long March-6 will be a small-thrust carrier rocket, and the Long March-7 will be a medium-thrust launch vehicle. Together with the Long March-5, they will form a family that can cover all necessities for launch vehicles and replace the current carrier rockets," Liang said.

    So far, the Long March-5 project has entered the testability analysis stage, he added.

    About 100,000 square meters of workshops have been completed so far at a new base being built in the Binhai New Area of the northern coastal city of Tianjin. The facility will be used for testing and manufacturing the Long March-5. Construction began last year with an investment of 1.5 billion yuan ($220 million), Liang said.

    Eventually, a total investment of 10 billion yuan will be poured into the base, which will be able to produce a maximum of 12 Long March-5 launch vehicles each year, he said.

    Qi Faren, former chief designer of Shenzhou spaceships and a CPPCC national committee member, said on Thursday that the Long March-5 will be used to launch China's space station mission.

    "We aim to send the core module of the space station into orbit before 2020. Without the large-thrust launcher, the 20-ton core module cannot be in place," he said.


    Before that, however, the first task of the Long March 5 may be to send the Fengyun-4 weather satellite into space from the launch center under construction at Wenchang in Hainan, China's southern island province, according to Liang.

    The new Fengyun-4 satellite, which is under design, weighs about eight to nine tons, which cannot be lifted by the current launchers that can carry a maximum payload of 5.2 tons to geo-stationary orbit, he added.

    Hou Lei contributed to the story"
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 12, 2014
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  2. Martian

    Martian Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    China develops phase-change RAM

    First PCRAM chip with China's self-owned intellectual property rights manufactured in Shanghai

    First PCRAM chip with China's self-owned intellectual property rights manufactured in Shanghai
    English.news.cn 2011-04-20 18:33:33

    [​IMG]
    Song Zhitang (L), a researcher at Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, works with his colleague in the laboratory in Shanghai, east China, on April 20, 2011. The first phase-change random access memory (PCRAM) chip with China's self-owned intellectual property rights was manufactured recently; jointly by Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation and Microchip Technology Incorporated. The chip has a memory volume of 8MB. (Xinhua/Liu Ying)

    [​IMG]
    A researcher shows the first phase-change random access memory (PCRAM) chip with China's self-owned intellectual property rights in Shanghai, east China, on April 20, 2011. (Xinhua/Liu Ying)

    [​IMG]
    A researcher, from Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, demonstrates the voice function of the first phase-change random access memory (PCRAM) chip with China's self-owned intellectual property rights at a laboratory in Shanghai, east China, on April 20, 2011. (Xinhua/Liu Ying)

    Achievements----Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology

    [​IMG]
    Shanghai Institute's PCRAM test chip was made on 200-mm diameter wafers.

    China develops phase-change RAM

    "China develops phase-change RAM
    Peter Clarke
    4/20/2011 7:55 AM EDT

    LONDON – The Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology (SIMIT) at the Chinese Academy of Sciences – working with foundry chipmaker SMIC and Microchip Technology – has announced it has developed phase-change random access memory (PCRAM) that is based on Chinese intellectual property, according to a Xinhua report.

    The 8-Mbit memory, scheduled for mass production later this year, is intended for use as a replacement for NOR flash in applications such as mobile storage and RFID, according to Chinese language reports in translation. It is relatively modest in capacity, compared with available flash memory but for China the development is intended to break the foreign control of memory chip production and has been accompanied by the filing of about 200 patents, the reports said.

    The PCRAM was manufactured jointly by Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corp. and Microchip Technology Inc., according to Xinhua, the official press agency of the government of the People's Republic of China. No details were provided of the geometry of the manufacturing process or plans to scale the manufacturing or produce devices with increased capacity.

    While it is expected that SMIC could act as a foundry manufacturer of the relatively modestly sized memory it is not yet clear what the role of Microchip (Chandler, Arizona) is in the development of the memory.

    Phase-change memory – like NOR and NAND flash – is nonvolatile, providing power-saving opportunities. Its operation is conventionally based on the change of resistance as a chalcogenide glass changes state from amorphous to crystalline under the heating effect of a current passing through a thin film. Although theoretically superior to DRAM, SRAM and flash memory on a number of counts it has yet to reach mainstream commercial adoption.

    Micron and Samsung are in the lead. Samsung has developed a 512-Mbit PCRAM test chip on a 60- to 65-nm manufacturing process which has achieved some deployment in Samsung mobile phone. Micron, through its Numonyx acquisition has a 128-Mbit device on 90-nm process. Numonyx was also working on a 1-Gbit phase-change memory on a 45-nm process.

    The Shanghai Institute's PCRAM test chip was made on 200-mm diameter wafers but details of the manufacturing process technology or whether it is based on chalcogenide material were not discussed in Chinese language reports.

    A voice demonstration has confirmed that the chip can read, write and erase, according to Xinhua. The patents cover technologies ranging from the distribution of materials, structures and chip design to means of testing. China plans to be able to supply 60 percent of its own memory IC requirements within 10 years."
     
  3. Martian

    Martian Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Search for dark matter moves one step closer to detecting elusive particle

    [​IMG]
    Hanguo Wang (Credit: Reed Hutchinson/UCLA)

    Search for dark matter moves one step closer to detecting elusive particle

    "Search for dark matter moves one step closer to detecting elusive particle
    April 15, 2011

    [​IMG]
    Katsushi Arisaka (left), holding QUPID, and Hanguo Wang
    (Credit: Reed Hutchinson/UCLA)

    (PhysOrg.com) -- Dark matter, the mysterious substance that may account for nearly 25 percent of the universe, has so far evaded direct observation. But researchers from UCLA, Columbia University and other institutions participating in the international XENON collaboration say they are now closer than ever before.

    Their new results, announced today at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy, where the XENON experiment is housed deep beneath a mountain 70 miles west of Rome, represent the highest-sensitivity search for dark matter yet, with background noise 100 times lower than competing efforts.

    Dark matter is widely thought to be a kind of massive elementary particle that interacts weakly with ordinary matter. Physicists refer to these particles as WIMPS, for weakly interacting massive particles. The XENON researchers used a dark-matter detector known as XENON100 — an instrumented vat filled with over 100 pounds of liquid xenon — as a target for these WIMPs, which are thought to be streaming constantly through the solar system and the Earth.

    And while the XENON100 experiment found no dark matter signal in 100 days of testing, the researchers' newly calculated upper limits on the mass of WIMPs and the probability of their interacting with other particles are the best in the world, said UCLA physics professor Katsushi Arisaka, a member of the international collaboration.

    [​IMG]
    Seven QUPIDs (QUartz Photon Intensifying Detectors), a new photon-detector technology that emits no radiation and will greatly reduce background noise in future dark matter searches. (Credit: Katsushi Arisaka)

    XENON100 looks for a primary flash of light that occurs when a particle bounces off a xenon atom inside the detector and a secondary flash when an electron knocked free from a xenon atom by a collision is accelerated toward the top of the device by an electric field, said UCLA physics researcher Hanguo Wang, who works closely with Arisaka. With this configuration, a WIMP will generate a signal fundamentally different from that of cosmic radiation or emission from the equipment itself, making it possible to identify background readings that could be mistaken for a positive detection, he said.

    Even though the experiment did not detect a WIMP, the progress sets the stage for an ambitious next-generation project called XENON1T, which will use a much larger, one-ton liquid xenon instrument with highly specialized light-detectors developed at UCLA that make it 100 times more sensitive than XENON100, said David Cline, a UCLA professor of physics and founder of UCLA's dark matter group.

    The search for dark matter

    Ordinary matter, which makes up the stars, planets, gas and dust in our galaxy, emits or reflects light that can be observed using telescopes on Earth or in space. However, the effect of dark matter, according to several theories, can be observed only indirectly by the gravitational force exerted on the more visible portions of the galaxy around us, Cline said.

    Despite the differences between ordinary and dark matter, cosmologists believe the two have been linked since the beginning of the universe, with dark matter playing a key role in the coalescing of particles into stars, galaxies and other large-scale structures after the Big Bang.

    [​IMG]
    The XENON100 experiment is located deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy to reduce contaminating signals from cosmic radiation. (Credit: Zina Deretsky, National Science Foundation)

    Though dark matter exerts a tangible force on the galaxy as a whole, individual WIMPs have proved far more difficult to detect. Because these particles interact only very weakly with normal matter, the small signal that might come from a WIMP detection above ground would be drowned out by the cosmic radiation that constantly bombards Earth's surface, Cline said.

    To eliminate the majority of this background noise, the XENON100 experiment is buried beneath almost one mile of rock in the Gran Sasso lab, the largest underground facility of its kind in the world. While dark matter particles can travel easily through the vast expanse of stone and pass through the detector, only the most energetic particles from space are able to follow, Arisaka said.

    Next steps

    Because the XENON100 experiment is shielded by large amounts of rock, as well as by several tons of copper, lead and water, the largest source of background detections is actually the radiation coming from the instrument itself, Arisaka said.

    In an effort to address this issue, Arisaka and Wang, working in collaboration with Hamamatsu Photonics in Japan, have developed the Quartz Photon Intensifying Detector (QUPID), a new light-detector technology that emits no radiation. The XENON group hopes to incorporate this breakthrough technology into the future XENON1T experiment.

    "We have developed a detector to be used in future experiments based on new photon-detector technology," Wang said. "We invented, tested and demonstrated its operation in liquid xenon in our laboratory at UCLA."


    In addition to Arisaka, Cline and Wang, UCLA's XENON group includes postdoctoral scholars Emilija Pantic and Paolo Beltrame and graduate students Artin Teymourian and Kevin Lung. Two students, Ethan Brown and Michael Lam, received doctorates last year through this experiment.

    Elena Aprile, a professor of physics at Columbia University, is the XENON collaboration's principal investigator and spokesperson.

    The XENON collaboration consists of 60 scientists from 14 institutions in the U.S. (UCLA, Columbia University, Rice University); China (Shanghai Jiao Tong University); France (Subatech Nantes); Germany (Max-Planck-Institut Heidelberg, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Willhelms Universität Münster); Israel (Weizmann Institute of Science); Italy (Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN e Università di Bologna); the Netherlands (Nikhef Amsterdam); Portugal (Universidade de Coimbra); and Switzerland (Universität Zürich).

    XENON100 is supported by its collaborating institutions and federally funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy, as well as by the Swiss National Foundation; France's Institut national de physique des particules et de physique nucléaire and La Région des Pays de la Loire; Germany's Max-Planck-Society and Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft; Israel's German-Israeli Minerva Gesellschaft and GIF; the Netherlands' FOM; Portugal's Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia; Italy's Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; and China's STCSM.

    Provided by University of California Los Angeles"
     
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  4. 4Aces

    4Aces Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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  5. Martian

    Martian Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    China succeeds in its largest unmanned "V750" helicopter's first flight

    [​IMG]
    The sensor pod is located below the front section of China's V750 UAV helicopter.

    [​IMG]
    Photo taken on May 7, 2011 shows the "V750" pilotless helicopter during a test flight in Weifang of east China's Shandong Province.

    [​IMG]
    The V750 unmanned helicopter, built with an engine that is the intellectual property of a Chinese company, will achieve mass production in Shandong. The prototype was shown in public at the previous Zhuhai International Air Show.

    [​IMG]
    Spectators view the "V750" pilotless helicopter during a test flight in Weifang of east China's Shandong Province, on May 7, 2011.

    China succeeds in its largest unmanned helicopter's first flight

    "China succeeds in its largest unmanned helicopter's first flight
    English.news.cn 2011-05-08 01:06:51

    JINAN, May 7 (Xinhua)-- An unmanned helicopter, the largest of its kind in China, successfully completed its first flight in Weifang City of east China's Shandong Province Saturday.

    The medium-sized unmanned helicopter, with a maximum takeoff weight of 757 kg, departed from the flight-test center of Weifang Tianxiang Aerospace Industry Co. Ltd in the morning. It hovered for ten minutes and performed a few maneuvers before finishing with a stable landing.

    The helicopter, model number "V750", has a load capacity of over 80 kg. It can fly a maximum speed of 161 km per hour with a cruising duration of over four hours. The aircraft can be controlled remotely within a distance of over 150 km or automatically flown following inputs from its program.

    Further, it could be used in surveillance, search and rescue, and scientific exploration for both military and civilian purposes, said Cheng Shenzong, Chairman of the Weifang Tianxiang Aerospace Industry Co. Ltd.

    The helicopter has been developed cooperatively by organizations from Weifang Tianxiang Aerospace Industry Co. Ltd., Qingdao Haili Helicopters Manufacturing Co. Ltd., and China National Aero-Technology Import and Export Corporation in August 2010.

    Editor: yan"

    [Note: Thank you to "Marchpole" for the pictures.]
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2011
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  6. Martian

    Martian Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Thermoelectrics generating electricity from waste heat is a step closer

    Thermoelectrics generating electricity from waste heat is a step closer

    "Thermoelectrics generating electricity from waste heat is a step closer
    May 6, 2011 by Lin Edwards

    [​IMG]
    a. Brillouin zone showing the low degeneracy hole pockets (orange) centred at the L point, and the high degeneracy hole pockets (blue) along the Σ line. The figure shows 8 half-pockets at the L point so that the full number of valleys, Nv, i…
    (Image credit: Nature, doi:10.1038/nature09996.)

    (PhysOrg.com) -- Scientists in China and the US have modified a common thermoelectric material to vastly improve its thermoelectric properties. The development could lead to new devices capable of converting waste heat into useful amounts of electricity.

    A thermoelectric material consists of alternating n-type and p-type semiconductors that together convert heat into electricity. In theory the heat could be sourced from any process that generates heat, but at present the materials are too inefficient to provide a commercially feasible way of generating electricity from waste heat, such as that produced in car exhausts.

    The most common thermoelectric p-type material in use is based on lead telluride (PbTe) and devices based on this material have been used in satellites, with heat sourced from radioisotopes, and in niche markets on Earth, where the heat is generated by burning fuels such as gas.

    The efficiency of the thermoelectric material is expressed as a “thermoelectric figure of merit,” ZT, which is a dimensionless figure derived from several factors including the electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity. The figure of merit needs to be over 1.5 for the material to be capable of generating useful amounts of electricity in commercial applications. PbTe thermoelectric materials are capable of withstanding high temperatures, but their figures of merit are around 0.8, which makes them suitable only for niche markets such as satellites.

    Now physicists from the California Institute of Technology and the Chinese Academy of Sciences have modified the amount of tellurium in the PbTe alloy and added selenium and sodium to produce a material with a figure of merit of 1.8 at 850K, which lead author Dr. Jeffrey Snyder described as “extraordinary.”

    In previous research Snyder and colleagues had achieved a ZT of 1.5 by doping PbTe with thallium and 1.4 by using sodium. Adding selenium to the mix improved the electrical conductivity while also reducing the thermal conductivity. The selenium increases the number of “degenerate valleys” in the electronic band structure of the material, and this boosts the electrical conductivity and raises the ZT figure. Known thermoelectrics have a typical valley degeneracy of less than six, but the number for the new material is 12 or greater.

    Dr. Snyder said he thought a figure of merit of 1.8 was the highest ever to be reproduced in independent laboratories. He also suggested that doping other thermoelectrics in the same way should improve their performance.

    Dr. Snyder said the team is now working on creating a promising n-type material and in improving the p-type material’s effectiveness at higher temperatures. The paper is published in Nature.

    More information: Convergence of electronic bands for high performance bulk thermoelectrics, Nature 473, 66–69 (05 May 2011) doi:10.1038/nature09996

    Abstract

    Thermoelectric generators, which directly convert heat into electricity, have long been relegated to use in space-based or other niche applications, but are now being actively considered for a variety of practical waste heat recovery systems—such as the conversion of car exhaust heat into electricity. Although these devices can be very reliable and compact, the thermoelectric materials themselves are relatively inefficient: to facilitate widespread application, it will be desirable to identify or develop materials that have an intensive thermoelectric materials figure of merit, zT, above 1.5 (ref. 1). Many different concepts have been used in the search for new materials with high thermoelectric efficiency, such as the use of nanostructuring to reduce phonon thermal conductivity2, 3, 4, which has led to the investigation of a variety of complex material systems5. In this vein, it is well known6, 7 that a high valley degeneracy (typically ≤6 for known thermoelectrics) in the electronic bands is conducive to high zT, and this in turn has stimulated attempts to engineer such degeneracy by adopting low-dimensional nanostructures8, 9, 10. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to direct the convergence of many valleys in a bulk material by tuning the doping and composition. By this route, we achieve a convergence of at least 12 valleys in doped PbTe1 − xSex alloys, leading to an extraordinary zT value of 1.8 at about 850 kelvin. Band engineering to converge the valence (or conduction) bands to achieve high valley degeneracy should be a general strategy in the search for and improvement of bulk thermoelectric materials, because it simultaneously leads to a high Seebeck coefficient and high electrical conductivity."
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2011
  7. Martian

    Martian Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Looking inside nanomaterials in three dimensions

    Looking inside nanomaterials in three dimensions

    "Looking inside nanomaterials in three dimensions

    (Nanowerk News) On May 13th 2011, the journal Science published a paper where scientists from Risø DTU in collaboration with scientists from China and USA, report a new method for revealing a 3D picture of the structure inside a material ("Three-Dimensional Orientation Mapping in the Transmission Electron Microscope").

    Most solid materials are composed of millions of small crystals, packed together to form a fully dense solid. The orientations, shapes, sizes and relative arrangement of these crystals are important in determining many material properties.

    [​IMG]

    Traditionally, it has only been possible to see the crystal structure of a material by looking at a cut surface, giving just 2D information. In recent years, x-ray methods have been developed that can be used to look inside a material and obtain a 3D map of the crystal structure. However, these methods have a resolution limit of around 100nm (one nanometer is 100,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair).

    In contrast, the newly developed technique now published in Science, allows 3D mapping of the crystal structure inside a material down to nanometer resolution, and can be carried out using a transmission electron microscope, an instrument found in many research laboratories.

    Samples must be thinner than a few hundred nanometers. However, this limitation is not a problem for investigations of crystal structures inside nanomaterials, where the average crystal size is less than 100 nanometers, and such materials are investigated all over the world in a search for materials with new and better properties than the materials we use today.

    For example, nanomaterials have an extremely high strength and an excellent wear resistance and applications therefore span from microelectronics to gears for large windmills. The ability to collect a 3D picture of the crystal structure in these materials is an important step in being able to understand the origins of their special properties.

    An example of such a 3D map is given in the figure, showing the arrangement of crystals in a 150nm thick nanometal aluminium film. The crystals have identical lattice structure (arrangement of atoms) but they are orientated in different ways in the 3D sample as illustrated by the labels 1 and 2. The colours represent the orientations of the crystals and each crystal is defined by volumes of the same colour. The individual crystals of various sizes (from a few nm to about 100 nm) and shapes (from elongated to spherical) are clearly seen and mapped with a resolution of 1 nanometer.

    An important advantage of such 3D methods is that they allow the changes taking place inside a material to be observed directly. For example, the mapping may be repeated before and after a heat treatment revealing how the structure changes during heating.

    This new technique has a resolution 100 times better than existing non-destructive 3D techniques and opens up new opportunities for more precise analysis of the structural parameters in nanomaterials.


    Source: Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy"

    ----------

    Three-Dimensional Orientation Mapping in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    "Science 13 May 2011:
    Vol. 332 no. 6031 pp. 833-834
    DOI: 10.1126/science.1202202

    * Report

    Three-Dimensional Orientation Mapping in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    1. H. H. Liu1,
    2. S. Schmidt1,
    3. H. F. Poulsen1,
    4. A. Godfrey2,
    5. Z. Q. Liu3,
    6. J. A. Sharon4, and
    7. X. Huang1,5,*

    + Author Affiliations

    1. 1Center for Fundamental Research: Metal Structures in Four Dimensions, Materials Research Division, Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark.
    2. 2Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing, P.R. China.
    3. 3Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 110016 Shenyang, P.R. China.
    4. 4Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.
    5. 5Danish-Chinese Center for Nanometals, Materials Research Division, Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark

    1. *↵To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: xihu@risoe.dtu.dk

    Abstract

    Over the past decade, efforts have been made to develop nondestructive techniques for three-dimensional (3D) grain-orientation mapping in crystalline materials. 3D x-ray diffraction microscopy and differential-aperture x-ray microscopy can now be used to generate 3D orientation maps with a spatial resolution of 200 nanometers (nm). We describe here a nondestructive technique that enables 3D orientation mapping in the transmission electron microscope of mono- and multiphase nanocrystalline materials with a spatial resolution reaching 1 nm. We demonstrate the technique by an experimental study of a nanocrystalline aluminum sample and use simulations to validate the principles involved.

    * Received for publication 27 December 2010.
    * Accepted for publication 1 April 2011."
     
  8. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    How can a county have science that is suposed to be advanced and never won a Nobel Prize, wait a minute some one in China did win a Nobel prize but think he is still in prison.
     
  9. Martian

    Martian Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    I have made over 1,000 informative posts in the Chinese sub-forum. I dropped by to start a new thread on China's Qing SSK. Instead, I have to read your flamebait. Until your ridiculous post is removed, I will not make another post on this forum.
     
  10. simplystupid

    simplystupid Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    1) Nobel prize never given asap after there immediate publication. Some times decades later. The Nobel Prize in Physics 2010 was awarded jointly to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov "for groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene" for paper that was published in 2004. Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov win 2010 physics Nobel for graphene - Physics Update

    2) Well Winning Nobel prize does not mean that new discovery or invention is one thing. there all together different applying the knowledge to practical fields and developing the application for every day use. Who doing that are well advancing their Science and technology but need necessary to win to noble prize. They may form a company which can be billion dollars worth.

    3) what is China is today is manufacturing hub primarily US and Western world. How did it started, US and western world wanted produce cheaper on cost arbitrage. what a cost arbitrage means, given same technology, same input cost of product, a produces more cheaper than b because of the low of manufacturing. Primarily low high human intensive work. Then China started importing high end manufacturing technology and machinery, started manufacturing not only high human intensive product but also started manufacturing other products much cheaper to Western countries. till now all these was done by Western companies who set up shops in China. Since innovation is no one IP, Chinese started who got these technologies, process and methodologies, started setting up their own Ventures. They are started manufacturing the products as subcontractors or contractors. Some of the venture even going ahead setting up their own upstream supply chain and down stream supply chain, including some of the brands. China became master of manufacturing hub and has all cutting edge manufacturing technologies. Now is going beyond that that starting its own high research. Soon or later you will find host of Chinese folks getting recognition for their inventions and discoveries. Pl. dont understand estimate China.

    4) One beauty of China is that China does not need market, it has its own market which is not underdeveloped. Even if US and western world bans all imports and exports to China < which will not happen >, they can sustain because they reach critical mass of their own. US and western world on hand became pure consumers - thinking that cutting edge manufacturing and high end manufacturing will remain in US and western world. Still US has edge in this area but the gap is narrowing every day. China is on par with the rest of world. There can be scenario where China will not need Western world other for market for the products, but western world needs definitely needs Chinese products. if you dont believe me go out your shopping various products inquire what percentage of product is being manufactured with in US, with in Western world. If products has any Chinese components irrespective it is high tech or low tech. May be at very very very high tech end you may find 100% US.
     
  11. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    That is conjecture, what I said is simply a matter of fact.
     
  12. simplystupid

    simplystupid Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    interpretation of the reality of what is happening.
     
  13. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Where I come from they say opinions are like ass holes everyone has one. I would rather stick with facts.
     
  14. nox007

    nox007 REGISTERED

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    I thought nano tech was banned
     
  15. BMD

    BMD Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    How can Barack Obama win the Nobel Peace Prize?

    I'd only just found this thread and it's a shame he's stopped posting.
     

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