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China's AVIC in Dubai Air Show 2017

Discussion in 'China & Asia Pacific' started by RMFAN, Nov 13, 2017.

  1. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Dubai Airshow 2017: China displays Cloud Shadow UAV
    China’s AVIC is displaying some of its heavy unmanned aerial vehicles, including the Cloud Shadow and Wing Loong II.



    China is steadily raising its profile at major international air shows, and Dubai Airshow 2017 is no exception. AVIC is presenting a range of heavy Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), including the Cloud Shadow.

    This is a 3.2t, jet-powered design with a claimed top speed of 520km/h for an endurance of five hours.
    According to AVIC, the Cloud Shadow is designed for reconnaissance and attack missions. It can carry a 400kg payload, including SAR radar, optronics turret and 4-6 guided bombs or missiles.

    The Cloud Shadow is designed to cruise at an altitude of 12,500m and a speed of 420km/h.

    At the show, AVIC is also displaying its Wing Loong II Medium-Altitude Long-Endurance (MALE) platform. This 4.2t UAV can carry a 480kg payload. It offers 20 hours’ autonomy at a cruise speed of 180-280km/h.
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  2. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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  3. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Chinese Z-10ME(export version)

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  4. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Chinese L-15 twin turbofan trainer

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  5. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Chinese FC-31 stealthy jet fighter

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  6. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Control station of Cloud Shadow UVA, the system can control 3 Cloud Shadow UVAs at the same time to complete the multi- missions.

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    The Pakistani like to try firstly.

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  7. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    DOl703pW4AYJGEn.jpg

    China’s CH-5 Cloud Shadow is powered by WP-11C turbojet, which has an interesting history. In Vietnam, China recovered shot-down Ryan Firebee drones equipped with Ryan CAE J69 turbojets and copied them. So China’s latest jet-powered UAV is powered by copies of US-made engines.

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  8. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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  9. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    China’s UAVs Proliferate in Middle East

    http://aviationweek.com/dubai-air-show-2017/china-s-uavs-proliferate-middle-east


    Chinese gains could make it difficult for the U.S. to break back into Middle East UAV market.

    Reluctance on the part of the U.S. to deliver armed unmanned air systems (UAS) to some of its key allies in the Middle East has resulted in a significant win for China.

    Chinese UAS manufacturers have been rewarded handsomely with major contracts from several Middle East and Central Asian governments.

    And China’s successes in those geographic areas have prompted it to explore other markets further afield.

    In April, Avic demonstrated a model of its Wing Loong II, an MQ-9 Reaper-size air system at an exhibition in Mexico—right in the U.S.’s backyard. In June, it debuted at the Paris Air Show, displayed with an array of Chinese-produced weaponry.

    It is hard to determine the actual number of Chinese-made armed UAVs now in service with countries in the Middle East, but the platforms are operational with the air forces of Iraq, Kazakhstan, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and reports suggest they have found their way into Egypt and Jordan as well.

    Some of these countries have also used them in combat. Saudi Arabia has employed the systems during the air campaign over Yemen, while Iraq has flown them in its ongoing campaign against the Islamic State group.

    The UAE has gone further and deployed several to Libya’s Marj District to support the Libyan National Army against Islamic fighters there.

    All these nations had requested to purchase armed versions of the General Atomics MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper, but were denied by the Obama administration due to concerns that selling into the region would break the international Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) rules, which attempt to prevent proliferation of technologies that enable the creation of delivery systems for nuclear, biological and chemical weapons.

    The UAE was granted permission to purchase unarmed exportable versions of the Predator, known as the Predator XP.

    Beijing’s success in the region revolves around two almost identical air systems, both virtual copies of the MQ-1 Predator. These are the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corp. (CASC) CH-4, known as Rainbow, and the Chengdu or Avic Wing Loong I, designated GJ-1 in the Chinese People’s Liberation Army Air Force service. One analysis puts the price of a CH-4 system at one-fifth that of an MQ-1.

    In October, it emerged that the Trump administration had begun exploring the loosening of the MTCR and other arms protocols in order to facilitate the export of U.S.-manufactured UAS, but China’s stranglehold could be difficult to break.

    In March, it was announced that CASC could open a factory to build as many as 300 CH-4 systems for the Saudi armed forces over the coming years.

     

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