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Chinese Aircraft Carriers: Updates & Discussions

Discussion in 'China & Asia Pacific' started by Hembo, Jun 8, 2011.

  1. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Russia is denying Chinese media claims that Moscow and Beijing have signed agreements to sell Russian-made arms and military technology to China, including 24 Su-35 multirole fighter jets and four Amur-class diesel submarines.

    During a recent visit by Chinese President Xi Jinping to Moscow from Friday to Sunday, no discussions took place regarding “military-technical cooperation” issues, the ITAR-TASS news agency reported Monday. This was in response to an earlier report by China’s CCTV on the same day.

    “The Kremlin is officially denying even discussing arms trade during Xi’s visit,” said Vasiliy Kashin, a China military specialist at the Moscow-based Centre for Analysis of Strategies and Technologies (CAST). “In Russia-China relations, specific arms trade contracts are almost never discussed by the top leaders, just the general approaches.”

    Another defense industry source in Russia said there are strong reservations about going forward on the memorandum of understanding signed in December to explore the sale of the twin-engine Su-35s and Amur submarines to China.

    China intentionally violated intellectual property right (IPR) agreements when it copied and manufactured Russia’s Su-27 fighter as the J-11B, according to Russia.

    In 1995, China secured a production deal with Russia to build 200 Su-27SKs, dubbed the J-11A, for $2.5 billion for the Shenyang Aircraft Corp. In 2006, Russia canceled the deal after 95 aircraft when it discovered China had reverse-engineered the fighter and was secretly manufacturing an indigenous copy, the J-11B, with Chinese-made avionics and engines.

    There are strong suspicions China will procure the technological know-how of the Su-35 and Amur and simply produce an indigenous version.

    But not all agree. Gary Li, a senior analyst at London-based IHS Fairplay, said China’s research and development have moved forward.

    “It no longer will seek to directly reverse engineer everything it buys, but maybe adopt parts of the platform for other projects [and] integrate into domestic designs,” he said.

    There also are concerns China wants access to the Su-35’s Saturn AL-117S engine, which is outfitted on the T-50, a prototype of Russia’s fifth-generation Sukhoi PAK FA stealth fighter.

    However, Kashin said the risks of selling the Russian engine to China are negligible.

    “An engine cannot be copied by obtaining a sample,” he said.

    Li said he could envision Chinese aerospace engineers studying the aircraft’s engine and thrust-vectoring for future inclusion, as well as the Amur sub’s air-independent propulsion, but it will still be more than a decade before China will stop having to order engines to replace “worn-out ones,” as it has been doing with the J-11 and J-10 fighters.

    “It always takes a few years before they can make a domestic alternative,” Li said.

    Kashin cautions that a Chinese attempt to copy the Su-35, as they did with the Su-27, would be more difficult, “because this time, our Ukrainian ‘brothers’ cannot help them by selling the Chinese all the technology they lacked for a handful of dollars. I think the Amur situation will be generally the same.”

    Ukraine has been accused of selling China former Soviet defense technologies, but it has no access to information regarding newer systems, such as the Su-35 and Amur.

    “The Amur ultimately isn’t a strategic submarine, and as Russia’s interests in the Far East are not yet that ambitious, they can afford to sell them to China,” Li said. “How better to keep the U.S. pivot off their backs?”

    Russia: No Deal on Sale of Fighters, Subs to China | Defense News | defensenews.com
     
  2. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

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  3. mjaawad

    mjaawad FULL MEMBER

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  4. Soumya

    Soumya Major STAR MEMBER

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    China navy chief says operational aircraft carrier a few years away


    The Chinese navy is using its first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, for training and testing and will decide on an operational carrier for the fleet after a few years of evaluation, Admiral Wu Shengli said on Thursday.

    The navy chief of the People’s Liberation Army, on a military-to-military visit with his U.S. counterpart, told reporters at the Washington Navy Yard that Chinese sailors would carry out “very heavy” training over the next two or three years as they assess the carrier.

    “After the training and experimentation we will have a final evaluation on the development of the aircraft carrier for the PLA navy,” said Shengli, whose delegation included the commander of the Liaoning and the first pilot to land on its flight deck.

    The Chinese carrier was built on the shell of a Soviet-era vessel that China purchased from Ukraine.China revamped the ship, which was formally commissioned in September 2012. Flight operations began two months later.

    The launch of the first Chinese carrier is been seen as a symbol of Beijing’s ambition for greater global influence and another sign of its rapid military buildup. U.S. officials have downplayed the importance, noting that it takes years to learn to effectively integrate carriers into fleet operations.

    Senior Captain Zhang Zheng, the commander of the Liaoning, said the carrier was smaller than U.S. aircraft carriers and had a “ski jump”-style ramp at the end of its longest runway.

    “We have around 36 airplanes operating on board our ship,” he told reporters. “And we are still practicing and doing tests and experiments for the equipment and systems.”

    Wu, Zhang and Captain Dai Ming Meng, the pilot who first landed on the carrier, visited several American ships in California earlier this week, including the carrier USS Carl Vinson, where they met with their counterparts.

    “We talked in great detail in San Diego with our aviation people and Admiral Wu’s aviation people,” said Admiral Jonathan Greenert, the U.S. Chief of Naval Operations, who hosted Wu. “It was great and inspiring to see two professionals talk about a common challenge – aviation from an aircraft carrier.”

    Wu received a ceremonial 19-gun salute at the Washington Navy Yard, the U.S. Navy’s oldest shore establishment, during his formal welcoming ceremony on Thursday. He and his delegation visited the Pentagon later for further discussions.

    The Wu visit was part of stepped-up efforts to improve military-to-military ties between the United States and China following a break in 2009 due to U.S. military sales to Taiwan. More than 40 visits, exchanges and engagements are planned for 2013, versus 20 last year.

    China is due to participate for the first time next summer in the U.S.-sponsored Rim of the Pacific exercises, the world’s largest maritime warfare exercise.

    With the United States shifting its focus on the Asia-Pacific after a dozen years of war in Afghanistan, the two navies are increasingly bumping up against each other in hot spots in the region. They hope to build up a mutual understanding that can help avert confrontations in the future.

    Greenert said recently that Wu and other Chinese military leaders want to “move on to a consistency of dialogue” and “get away from miscalculation.”

    “He has a challenge of a growing navy and an assignment … to operate in the South China Sea,” Greenert told the American Enterprise Institute think tank last week. “They know we’re going to be there too … so he wants to get away from miscalculation and preclude … a scenario that they just wish they hadn’t gotten themselves into.”

    China navy chief says operational aircraft carrier a few years away | idrw.org
     
  5. Hidalgo

    Hidalgo 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    China developing worlds first 180,000-ton double-hull aircraft carrier
    Published October 9, 2013 | By admin
    SOURCE: CHINA DAILY MAIL



    Qianzhan.com said in its report yesterday: China has to put an end to its old practice of following others countries’ footsteps.

    Sources say that through meticulous engineering and mechanical analysis, China will conduct research and development of the first 180,000-ton double hull aircraft carrier in the world.

    If successful, it will be a movable Chinese territory with maritime hegemony.It will have a huge capacity, capable of carrying 125 J-20 fighter jets enough to destroy any existing aircraft carrier in the world.

    Sources say that China conducts research into a 180,000-ton double hull aircraft carrier because compared with a monohull aircraft carrier, it has exceptional advantages.

    A double hull carrier may have two identical runways for simultaneous taking off and landing.

    In addition the diagonal runway on the existing Nimitz-class aircraft carrier is too short to be free of the risk of crash
     
  6. aimarraul

    aimarraul 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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  7. TSUNAMI

    TSUNAMI Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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  8. Zeus_@21

    Zeus_@21 Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Looks good!!
     
  9. sangos

    sangos Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    China pathetic Navy and toy boats would have made admiral Zhang He go :rofl:
     
  10. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Re: Chinese Aircraft Carriers: Updates & Discussions

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  11. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Re: Chinese Aircraft Carriers: Updates & Discussions

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  12. brahmos_ii

    brahmos_ii Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    China announced on Monday that Liaoning, its new aircraft carrier, has carried out over 100 tests and training manoeuvres in the South China Sea since early December. This is the first time the carrier has carried out tests and complicated manoeuvres since being commissioned late last year.

    The announcement came soon after the Chinese and US navies exchanged sharp words over a near collision involving vessels from the two sides in the same sea earlier in the month. A Chinese ship sailing next to the carrier had come uncomfortably close to a US missile destroyer

    It is not clear if the near miss took place during China's testing of the carrier's combat capabilities. Observers suspect Chinese naval officers were putting the ships attached to the carrier through a stress test by allowing one of them to get close to the US vessel. The US navy had earlier blamed the Chinese navy for the miscalculation that resulted in the near-collision situation.

    "The Liaoning successfully performed several tests of the combat system today and organized for the first time comprehensive combat training," the People's Liberation Army navy said in a statement. "Through this operation, we tested the carrier's combat capability and tried the performance of its propulsion and seaworthiness."

    The mission is characterized by a large number of tests, rigorous standards, complicated circumstances as well as collaboration with multiple military units, it said. The carrier was joined by two missile destroyers, the Shenyang and Shijiazhuang, and two missile frigates, the Yantai and Weifang, during the mission.

    "The South China Sea has deep waters, strong wind and big waves, making it a suitable place for the aircraft carrier to conduct tests and training," state media quoted Zhang Zheng, senior captain of the Liaoning, as saying. South China Sea has disputed islands, which are claimed by Vietnam, the Philippines and China. The sea is closely patrolled by the US navy.

    Chinese military sources recently revealed the country was in the process of building a second aircraft carrier, which would rival US carriers in terms of capability by 2020.

    China says conducted 100 tests on aircraft carrier - The Times of India
     
  13. aimarraul

    aimarraul 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Last edited: Jan 2, 2014
  14. aimarraul

    aimarraul 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Liaoning back in port after successful 37-day trials - CHINA - Globaltimes.cn

    The Liaoning, China's first aircraft carrier, returned to its home port in Qingdao, East China's Shandong Province, on Wednesday after a 37-day trial in the South China Sea.

    The Liaoning left port on November 26 for its first cross-sea training voyage since it was commissioned into the People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) last year.

    During the voyage, officers and soldiers on board completed a series of comprehensive tests, including trials on the aircraft carrier's seaworthiness under high seas and speed measurements under deep water conditions. It also conducted drills on more than 100 indicators of its combat system under simulated combat circumstances.

    According to a source with the PLAN, the aircraft carrier also conducted the first formation practice which centered on the Liaoning.

    Such tests "attained the anticipated objectives," the source said.

    Liaoning's combat and power systems have been further tested during the trip.

    "All tests and training programs went as scheduled," said the source.

    The PLAN dispatched aircraft, naval vessels and submarines in multiple models to participate in the tests.

    The aircraft carrier was escorted by two missile destroyers, the Shijiazhuang and the Shenyang, as well as two missile frigates, the Yantai and Weifang, while en route to the trial waters.

    While the trials were taken in the South China Sea, where China and several neighboring countries have territorial disputes, the PLAN had stated that it was a "normal arrangement."
     
  15. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    China reportedly starts building second aircraft carrier

    China has started constructing the second of four planned aircraft carriers, a top government official said according to media reports on Saturday.

    The ship is under construction in the northeastern port of Dalian and will take six years to build, the reports said quoting Wang Min, Communist Party chief for Dalian’s Liaoning province.

    The country’s first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, was completed in September 2012 in a symbolic milestone for the country’s increasingly muscular military.

    Another two are in the pipeline, according to Wang, in a projection of power that could be seen as contradicting Beijing’s long-stated policy of arming itself strictly for self-defence.

    When the Liaoning went into service, Beijing and Tokyo were locked in a territorial row over the Japanese-controlled Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea which China also claims and calls the Diaoyus.

    The row continues to simmer, along with other sovereignty disputes with the Philippines and Vietnam.

    Early this month, a Japanese newspaper said China was overhauling its military structure in order to strengthen its attack capability and secure air and naval superiority in the South China and East China seas.

    The Liaoning carrier conducted its maiden mission in the South China Sea in January.

    It followed an incident in December in which a US warship was forced to avoid a collision with a Chinese naval vessel, prompting Washington to accuse China of being the aggressor.

    More Info
     

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