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Chinese military helicopters

Discussion in 'China & Asia Pacific' started by Agent_47, Dec 4, 2016.

  1. RMLOVER

    RMLOVER Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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  2. RMLOVER

    RMLOVER Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    [​IMG]

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  3. Hawk Wang

    Hawk Wang FULL MEMBER

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    Look at these lovely birds, beautiful and fatal.
     
  4. RMLOVER

    RMLOVER Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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  5. old driver

    old driver IDF NewBie

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    cool,i Don not know China has so many kind of helicopters٩( 'ω' )و
     
  6. Hawk Wang

    Hawk Wang FULL MEMBER

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    Hey,buddy! Are you serious? You look like you don't show much concern for development of our military equipment .
     
  7. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    China only have one or two original designs. Everything else is a copy of a copy. Best example is Z-18, vintage design still in production.
     
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  8. Hawk Wang

    Hawk Wang FULL MEMBER

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    I don't konw what is your point ?What are you implying? Maybe remind me that the designs of these helicopters is not chinese "original designs" can make your weak and envious heart feel better. What do you think about"copy"? The fact is that,on the founding of New China,the United States and Western countries began imposing an all-round blockade and embargo against New China. So the only way that we can master core technologies is "copy" or " reverse engineering".it make our country builds and consolidates its national defense independently and through self-reliance. If you want to really understand what is "made in china" or what is "chinese original designs" , I recommend you to read this news: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-0192822d-14f1-432b-bd25-92eab6466362 that news about China's Science Revolution was reported by BBC.

    " The total number of filings under WIPO’s Patent and Cooperation Treaty (PCT)12 The United States of America (US) saw double digit growth in PCT filings and together with China accounted for 56% and 29% of the total PCT growth, respectively.

    With 57,239 applications in 2013, the US exceeded in 2013 its previous filing peak of 54,046 applications reached prior to the global financial crisis in 2007. China surpassed Germany to become the third largest user of the PCT system, with Japan as the second-highest user. The US remains the most-active user of the system ....... "
    for details see this link:http://www.wipo.int/pressroom/en/articles/2014/article_0002.html


    " In the last 10 years China has made formidable progress in science and engineering fields and it is now the world’s third largest producer of peer-reviewed research articles after the European Union and United States, according to a major report published by the US National Science Foundation.

    According to Science and Engineering Indicators 2014, out of the world’s 827,705 articles published in 2011, researchers in the combined 28 European Union countries produced 254,482 articles (31%), the United States 212,394 (26%), China 89,894 (11%) and Japan 47,106 (6%). "
    see link below:http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20140227152409830

    At last ,whether you like China or not, you have to face the that "Made in China" has been all over the world , chinese science and technology have come to pervade every aspect of your lives. "Made in China" naturally includes military equipment, so you have to face that too.





     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2017
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  9. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    I was not implying anything else. China is incapable of developing helicopters even today after all the economic developments.

    Selective quoting of western media and odd justification for theft as usual.
     
  10. Hawk Wang

    Hawk Wang FULL MEMBER

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    I really do not understand some people in the world who are always try to disparage “made in China”and accuse China of stealing technology from everywhere. So follow this logic,the Chinese goods belongs to stolen goods,using and purchasing Chinese goods belongs to sheltering booty, It's just like people accuse a thief when they enjoying the booty, which one is more shameless?
     
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  11. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Admitting of theft and calling it an accusation in one sentence ? If the thief is shameless then why should any one else? No one expects quality anyway.

    On topic
    Anything to add on lack of helicopters?
     
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  12. RMLOVER

    RMLOVER Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Recent Developments in the Chinese Army’s Helicopter Force
    Publication: China Brief Volume: 17 Issue: 8
    By: Dennis J. Blasko

    June 9, 2017 09:43 AM Age: 3 months

    https://jamestown.org/program/recent-developments-chinese-armys-helicopter-force/

    Update: Since the publication of this article, Chinese reporting on the Army Aviation brigades in the new 74th and 75th Group Armies indicates that the 74th GA has been formed around units primarily from the former 42nd GA, not the 41st as previously reported, and the 75th GA has taken over units from the former 41st GA, instead of the 42nd.
    In November 2016, Chinese internet sources showed photos of a ceremony in the (former) 13th Group Army of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) Army accepting the 1,000th helicopter into the force (NetEase, May 23). This nice round number demonstrates the growth of the Army Aviation Corps over the past decade. Along with Special Operations Forces (SOF), Army Aviation is one of the “new-type combat forces” given priority for development. The increase in the number of Army helicopters accompanies the expansion of the force in the latest round of reforms. [1] In roughly a month’s time, half of all Army Aviation units have experienced some sort of organizational change. However, even as the numbers of helicopters rise, the size of the Army Aviation force is still small for a ground force that will probably number around a million personnel by 2020. [2] The recent changes are an attempt to improve and expand a force that underpins a number of important capabilities from tactical mobility and special operations to logistics support.

    The Near Future by 2020

    It seems likely that the new reforms will seek to assign both an Army Aviation brigade and a SOF brigade to each of the 13 group armies at the very least. With the exception of two group armies, this has already been accomplished by expanding four regiments to brigades and the reassignment of units (such as appears to have occurred with the former GSD Army Aviation brigade and the Xinjiang Military District Army Aviation brigade).

    New units will need to be established for the 71st and 78th Group Armies. This process might entail transferring elements from existing units to establish “starter” brigades in the group armies (or other organizations) that currently do not have helicopter assets, unless the civilian defense industries and foreign helicopter purchases can come up with relatively large numbers of airframes to outfit a complete unit at one time.

    But developing mature, experienced pilots and crews, especially in complex night and low-level operations, takes longer than building a helicopter. If existing Army Aviation brigades do not have the full complement of the reported eight subordinate groups, it is likely the smaller brigades will add additional aircraft as they (and pilots and aircrew) become available. For SOF units, existing regiments likely will be expanded to brigades and the two group armies without SOF units likely will convert conventional infantry units to SOF brigades (some of which might come from existing infantry units in disbanded group armies). Like helicopter pilots, developing proficient SOF personnel and units also takes years. Both Army Aviation and Special Operations Forces Academies (or Colleges) have been established to meet increasing demands for properly trained and educated officers and NCOs in these specialties.

    Thus, in the near future we are likely to see reports of Army Aviation brigades in the 71st and 78th Group Armies. The Army Aviation regiment in Tibet could also be expanded, though geographic conditions make air operations at that altitude more difficult than in lower regions (so it may remain a regiment). If the Army Aviation brigade in Xinjiang has not been transferred in full to the 76th Group Army, it will likely be restored to full strength, or a new unit created, since the size of the Western Theater Command is so large additional helicopter assets would be logical. Likewise, new SOF brigades are likely to be found in the 72nd, 74th, 79th (an expansion from the current regiment), 81st, and 83rd Group Armies and smaller SOF battalions or companies added to divisions and brigades. [4] These new SOF units are likely to be converted from former infantry units and personnel.

    Since Army Aviation assets are increasingly important to modern joint and combined arms operations, the PLA could augment additional organizations with helicopters of all types. For example, the five joint Theater Commands and the five Theater Command Army headquarters each could probably use organic helicopter units, perhaps smaller in size than a full brigade (such as a regiment or group) for a variety of purposes, including command and control, attack, transport, electronic warfare, medical evacuation, logistics, and reconnaissance tasks. The three major garrison cities of Beijing, Tianjin, and Shanghai and other important cities also could probably use smaller helicopter units for similar purposes, as well as during disaster relief missions. Border and coastal defense units would likely find helicopter units very useful in monitoring their border regions as well as for logistics. The newly formed Joint Logistics Support Force would benefit from having helicopters available to directly support the Wuhan Joint Logistics Support Base and five Joint Logistics Support Centers.

    Though it has been suggested for years, the current round of reform could also establish one or more airmobile units that integrate infantry and helicopter units, with the necessary support, into one (or more) organic unit, perhaps at the group army or corps-organizational level.

    Conclusions

    The more the PLA Army trains and operates using helicopter and SOF units, the more it will understand how vital they are to modern operations. They will constantly be reminded of the lesson from the 2008 Sichuan earthquake relief effort of the need for even more helicopters for effective and efficient operations. The Army, however, is constrained by the ability of the civilian Chinese aviation industry to produce enough aircraft and develop new models to rectify shortcomings in medium- and heavy-lift helicopters. The addition of attack helicopters in recent years greatly increases the lethality of the force but also complicates tactics and logistics. The distances and speed at which Army Aviation and SOF units can move adds new capabilities to the PLA.

    On the other hand, more and larger Army Aviation and SOF units will be much more expensive to man, organize, equip, and maintain than former infantry units. Realistic training for these units will also demand a larger slice of the defense budget at the same time the other services are training more and further from China’s borders. So as the PLA draws down to 2 million people and its responsibilities extend to distances farther from China, we should not expect to see decreases in future defense budgets.

    Properly organized, trained, and equipped Army Aviation and SOF units will be able to contribute to joint maritime or land campaigns beyond China’s borders. While doctrine allows for such operations, additional modifications based on new capabilities and technologies likely will be required. However, exercises over the past few years have determined that many tactical and operational commanders are not yet properly trained and ready to employ the helicopter and SOF assets assigned to them. For example, the PLA media routinely reports that some commanders do not know how to employ “new-type combat forces” or do not dare or are unwilling to do so (81.cn, July 31, 2016). Part of the reason for this problem likely is, that in the past there were so few Army Aviation and SOF units available, commanders up to battalion level, who were trained almost exclusively in their own branch functions, had little opportunity to interact with Army Aviation and SOF personnel or units. As the PLA Army grows smaller, “new-type combat forces” will become a larger percentage of the force and more commonly seen in training. Nonetheless, changing commanders’ mindsets on the integration of Army Aviation and SOF into traditional operations will not magically occur overnight.

    It has taken roughly 20 years for the Army Aviation Corps to expand from seven units with 135 mostly transport helicopters to 12 operational units with over 1,000 helicopters of all types including dedicated attack helicopters. It seems likely that the force will grow faster in the coming years than over the first two decades of the Army Aviation Corps’ existence. Because they are among the “new-type combat forces,” Army Aviation and Special Operations Forces units will be in the news frequently as they train and operate together. However, by the time this article is published, there will probably be new developments announced, which will require constant attention by foreign analysts.

    Dennis J. Blasko, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army (Retired), is a former U.S. army attaché to Beijing and Hong Kong and author of The Chinese Army Today (Routledge, 2006).
     
  13. RMLOVER

    RMLOVER Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    The R&D projects of Chinese future helicopters

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  14. Angel Eyes

    Angel Eyes 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    So china is indeed working on tilt rotor aircraft.....
     
  15. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog Staff Member MODERATOR

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    AVIC Mil AHL "advanced heavy lift"
     

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