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Decision on Mars mission launch date tomorrow: ISRO

Discussion in 'Indian Military Doctrine' started by layman, Oct 19, 2013.

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  1. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    A decision on the date of launch of India’s Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) would be taken on Saturday, Chairman of Indian Space Research Organisation K Radhakrishnan said.

    Radhakrishnan said the ship-borne communication terminals are on their way to the South Pacific Ocean and their movement is being monitored.

    “Some more information has to come. It (ship-borne communication terminals) has to be positioned in the right place to see the injection (of mars orbiter spacecraft)â€, he added. “So, that update we will get tomorrowâ€.

    He also said the Launch Authorization Board would have another session tomorrow where the date would be finalized.

    “Otherwise, every thing is fine with the satellite and launch vehicleâ€.

    The two ships SCI Yamuna and SCI Nalanda – leased from the Shipping Corporation of India to study the crucial period when the rocket ejects the spacecraft into space – left for the South Pacific Ocean in mid-September from Visakhapatnam.

    The launch window for the MOM mission is from October 28 to November 19. The American NASA/JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) is also providing communications and navigation support to this mission with their deep space network facilities.

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  2. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Pacific cyclone delays India's Mars mission by a week

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    New Delhi: The launch of India's maiden mission to Mars has been postponed by a week; it is now to be launched in November if weather permits. Ironically, rough weather in the Pacific Ocean has forced this decision.

    The Mangalyaan was to be launched as early as October 28, but it will now definitely miss this first opportunity, the Indian Space Research Organisation or ISRO has confirmed.

    The mission can be launched anytime until November 19, 2013, so all is not lost.

    The good news is that India's satellite for its maiden mission to Mars and the rocket - the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) - that will hoist it into space are ready. The bad news is that weather in the Pacific Ocean has slowed things down, K Radhakrishnan, ISRO chairman told NDTV.

    India will launch an unmanned scientific satellite to Mars in a mission that has cost Rs. 450 crore to study the thin Martian atmosphere.

    For the first time, India is deploying two special ships hired from the Shipping Corporation of India, SCI Nalanda and SCI Yamuna, and these will monitor the health and movement of India's rocket several minutes after the launch when it is coasting in the sky over the Pacific Ocean. This is a special requirement for the Mars mission.

    Mr Radhakrishnan says the movement of Indian ships in the Pacific has been slowed down due to the bad weather and a decision on the date of the launch can possibly be taken on October 22, when he says the second ship reaches its destination in the Pacific Ocean.

    The Mangalyaan satellite has been fuelled and now the spacecraft is being mated with the rocket on India's space port, Sriharikota. Both the machines, according to Mr Radhakrishnan, are ready to meet the next launch opportunity.

    At this time of the year, the weather at Sriharikota is always a big worry since this is the cyclone season in the Bay of Bengal. But for the first time, ISRO is forced to worry about weather in faraway Pacific to arrive at an opportune launch window for India's first inter-planetary mission.

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  3. Soumya

    Soumya Major STAR MEMBER

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    Final countdown for Mars mission starts on Sunday

    MUMBAI: The final countdown for the much-awaited launch of India's Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) will start at 6am on November 3, an Isro official said on Monday. The launch is slated for 2.36pm on November 5.

    Isro chairman, K Radhakrishnan told the media that postponement of the launch from October 28 to November 5 has come as an advantage because the spacecraft will be less exposed to the Van Allen radiation belt.

    The 56-and-a-half-hour final countdown will consist of filling liquid propellants in the second and fourth stage of the rocket, and checking the electrical system and the communication network. PSLV-XL, the rocket which will be used for the launch, is an advanced version of the four-stage Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle.

    Final countdown for Mars mission starts on Sunday - The Times of India
     
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  4. Soumya

    Soumya Major STAR MEMBER

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    Mars mission launch cleared for Tuesday

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    The country’s highly anticipated Mars Orbiter Mission will take off as planned on Tuesday, November 5, at 2.38 p.m.

    An ISRO official said the Launch Authorisation Board on Friday cleared the flight from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre.

    The 56-hour countdown begins on Sunday at 6.08 a.m.

    The green signal comes a day after ISRO completed a dry run or rehearsal to test the launch readiness of its mission control staff and centres.

    The 1,350-kg spacecraft carrying five experiments is slated to be flown on a PSLV vehicle from the Sriharikota launchpad. After a 53-minute cruise it will be ejected into space somewhere over the South Pacific, after which it will follow a special path or trajectory initially around Earth over the next 25 days.

    To capture details of these critical moments, ISRO has put tracking terminals on two ships and deployed them to the South Pacific along with its engineers and navigation scientists.

    On November 30, the spacecraft will be thrust out of the Earth’s pull and on to its path towards Mars.

    That is a journey of 300 days. The orbiter is slated to reach the Martian sphere of influence on September 24, 2014, and then go around the Earth’s neighbour for at least six months.

    Mars mission launch cleared for Tuesday - The Hindu

    NASA sends ISRO peanuts for Mars trip via Facebook

    As ISRO’s scientists prepare themselves for a landmark-making launch of the Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) on November 5, their counterparts in NASA, the U.S. space agency, have extended their good wishes for the mission by sending them some ‘lucky peanuts’.

    The good wishes were posted on ISRO’s eight-day-old MOM Facebook page.

    NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL), which has posted the wishes, adds that eating peanuts while launching a big mission has become a tradition for its scientists since the early 1960s.

    NASA had successively failed in the launch of its first six Ranger lunar probes, but succeeded in the seventh attempt. When Ranger-7 was launched in 1964, someone in mission control was eating peanuts and passing them around at the time of critical stage of the Ranger-7’s flight. The mission clicked and the credit went to the peanuts.

    Ever since then, JPL scientists always bring along jars of roasted peanuts to the control room during launches.

    And now, NASA has shared its ‘lucky peanuts’ with ISRO: “good luck peanuts from NASA to ISRO!” says the JPL post.

    “Go MOM, dare mighty things,” JPL egged ISRO scientists. “Prepare for your launch to Mars, do not forget one of the few but important actions: pass around the peanuts.” The motif ‘dare mighty things’ is also pasted on the NASA jars.

    On the practice of handing over peanuts, the JPL post explains: “...it has been a long-standing tradition to hand out peanuts whenever we do anything important, like land on Mars. We use all the luck we can get!”

    The ISRO Mars mission, which joined Facebook on October 22 as part of its public outreach plan, has received more than 10,000 likes within a week.

    The Facebook connect is the first of ISRO’s public interfaces about MOM. ISRO Chairman K. Radhakrishnan recently told The Hindu , “We want to bring this mission to the people of this country. They should live with us during the entire mission period.”

    For the Mars mission, ISRO, he had said, would continue the efforts through the Internet, “not by sensation but with constant, relevant information for the interested community.”

    http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/science/nasa-sends-isro-peanuts-for-mars-trip-via-facebook/article5304758.ece
     
  5. Soumya

    Soumya Major STAR MEMBER

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    Catching faint Martian whispers on Earth

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    Byalalu, Karnataka: The biggest challenge for any mission to Mars is how do you communicate with an object that is some 200 million kilometres away, as converting those faint whispers into intelligent signals is a Herculean task. India has set up a giant dish antenna 32 meters in diameter exactly for this purpose. NDTV travelled to this giant celestial listening post to understand how the many challenges were overcome.

    India's biggest dish antenna, a whopping 32 meters in diameter which dominates the sky in sub-urban Bangalore, is the country's listening post for its Mangalyaan mission. It is large so that it can send and receive the faint murmurs from India's Martian explorer even when it is some 400 million kilometres away at its farthest point.

    Communicating with Mangalyaan is going to be a big challenge. The distances are so far that when one says or sends a message 'Hello, how are you Mangalyaan?' it will take at least 20 minutes for it to be received by the satellite and for Mangalyaan to respond saying 'Bangalore, I am fine' another 20 minutes would have lapsed. So, a simple conversation has a lag of almost 40 minutes.

    This challenge has been overcome by incorporating as many as four computers on the space craft that give it a lot of autonomy to take decisions on its own.

    TK Rajendran, Communications scientist, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), Bangalore, says "Yes, we can communicate with India's Mars mission and we are ready for it."

    India is also taking help from NASA to use their communications network to track Mangalyaan during the times it is not visible from India.

    Catching faint Martian whispers on Earth | NDTV.com
     
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