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Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) : News and Updates

Discussion in 'Indian Defence Industry' started by Manmohan Yadav, Oct 19, 2011.

  1. Soumya

    Soumya Major STAR MEMBER

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    Supersonic track at TBRL goes live

    (Unedited Release)

    Rail Track Rocket Sled (RTRS) Penta Rail Supersonic Track a national test facility was today inaugurated by Shri Avinash Chander, SA to RM, Secretary Department of Defence R&D and DG DRDO.

    “India is among a handful of countries in the world now possessing this unique test facility. This four kilometer long RTRS Penta track will be extremely useful for the testing of wide range of critical systems such as payload for manned missions of ISRO, the navigation system for missiles and aircrafts, proximity fuses for advanced warheads, fuses for armament systems parachutes for payload delivery, arrester systems for aircraft such as LCA”, stated Sh Avinash chander while inaugurated this National Test Facility, in presence of Dr SS Sundaram, DG(ECS), Dr Satish Kumar, Chief Controller (TM), Shri Ajay Singh, Chief Executive (CW&E), Sh M Balakrishnan and Sh V S Sethi , both former directors of TBRL and officers & staff of TBRL.

    Later, in his national technology Day address, he stated “I am glad that today we have added another key facility in TBRL. He also witnessed the demonstration of several newer advanced warheads”. Lauding the efforts of TBRL scientists in developing key technologies that are strategically important for the security of the nation, he said, that the observance of National Technology Day began with the technologies in which TBRL has played a key role. He also inaugurated the new building of Ballistics Vidyalaya, Ramgargh, a school run by DRDO Educational Society and the “Sampooran Singh Officers Transit Facility", within the premises of TBRL residential area at Ramgarh.

    Describing the RTRS facility, Dr Manjit Singh Outstanding Scientist & Director TBRL said, “the facility consists of five rails, each having a length of 4 km, on which a test article can be propelled at supersonic speed with the help of specially designed rockets. The track built for this purpose is precision aligned and capable of withstanding high level of loads. The capability so acquired will accelerate the pace of development of defence and aerospace technologies and products”.

    Source: Tarmak007 FB page

    [​IMG]
     
    Zeus_@21 and WMD like this.
  2. Paliwal Warrior

    Paliwal Warrior Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    DRDO on a roll with a lot of its products flying past its certifications stage and entering productions

    LCH close to IOC
    LUH close to prototype
    Arjun mk2 close to get past tipping point in Orders
    LCA Mk1 close to FOC
    NLCA close to SBTF testing
    Astra Close to firing at live targets
    Aakash close to get past inflection point in orders
    Nirbhay Second test on the cards
     
  3. Paliwal Warrior

    Paliwal Warrior Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  4. Paliwal Warrior

    Paliwal Warrior Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  5. Paliwal Warrior

    Paliwal Warrior Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  6. Paliwal Warrior

    Paliwal Warrior Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  7. Anish

    Anish Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    For the sake of India's security, our defence R&D capabilities need a major shake-up


    The evidence of failures in our Defence R&D and manufacturing eco system are myriad.

    A country that has a proud aviation heritage spanning several decades is forced to buy trainer aircraft from Switzerland, a country otherwise known for chocolates and watches!

    (P.S: Even Pakistan makes its own trainer aircraft albeit helped by their Chinese friends).

    [​IMG]


    +2
    India could design fighter jets in the 1960s but deploying Tejas has taken over 30 years. Meanwhile, we still have to successfully design an Indian jet engine to power our fighters

    Challenges

    The Navy is given an aircraft carrier – almost a decade behind schedule and billions of dollars over-budget.

    When delivered it also lacked any air defence systems, as the PM reportedly found out when he first visited it!

    The Tejas fighter aircraft takes 30 years and we are still counting as it is still being putting through its paces by HAL.

    We have still to have successfully design an Indian jet engine to power our fighters!

    On the other end of the spectrum, soldiers have to sometimes buy their own shoes and uniforms because what’s produced by the Government Ordinance boards are substandard.

    I can go on and on!

    India faces some of the biggest challenges that any nation faces in terms of its security.

    We have a porous coastline and borders along with the embrace of several neighbours that are determined to cook up a constant stew of terrorism and keep the country on the boil!

    Keeping our country secure is critical for our economic development and growth.

    But to do so in the current inefficient way of the Ministry of Defence (MoD) product development and acquisition is unsustainable and unaffordable!

    Finally, questions are being asked and solutions being sought to breathtaking amounts of money being spent on imports over the last several decades, that still leave our forces under equipped and under-prepared.

    [​IMG]
    Changing the DRDO head would be a good start if Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar wants to shake up the defence and security sectors

    That the MoD needs a real shake up is stating the obvious.

    Fundamental changes are required in planning, procurement and contracting.

    Most importantly it is the R&D and manufacturing segments that need real restructuring – especially given the Government’s ‘Make in India’ focus.

    The MoD’s Defence Research & Development Organisation (DRDO) and its doctrine of research need a rethink.

    The MoD’s manufacturing and domestic capability also need a rethink and re-architecting.

    It is obvious there’s something really wrong if a country that could design jet fighters way back in the ‘60s isn’t able after 30 years, to get the Tejas fighter jet deployed.

    In fact, we are now having to negotiate a $25 billion dollar deal with France.

    The concept of centralised labs like DRDO that are distant from commercial manufacturing and product companies are a relic of the past.

    There is no modern technology eco-system where product development is separate from the manufacturing units, as an ivory tower with little or no accountability!

    Development

    Technology development and product development in today’s age need to be integrated – both from a point of view of product and solution development, as also from a commercial cost standpoint.

    That the DRDO head must be also the Defence Minister’s scientific advisor, creates a holy cow around the DRDO and perpetuates an inefficient monopoly, in innovation and design.

    That a deep restructuring of the DRDO is required is obvious to many, including those in the DRDO who are impatient with the culture of ‘Government R&D’.

    Technology and development need cultures of risk taking, exploration and innovation!

    The current DRDO is a far cry from that as can be seen by long delays and cost overruns in projects!

    For those who argue that R&D and design don’t belong in the government sector, I present to them ISRO’s world class accomplishments.

    Imagine if DRDO was in charge of R&D for ISRO and ISRO was simply the launching entity. We would still be worrying about launching our first satellite!

    The DRDO structure harks back to the days when there were technology embargos against India and DRDO was the way to channel technologies from friendly governments.

    The restructuring and the new DRDO must start with a separation of the DRDO head from the scientific advisor to the Defence Minister’s role.

    DRDO itself must be made into different labs – that specialise in specific critical futuristic technologies. DRDO needs to be right-sized and focus only on technologies.

    Conventional product technologies should be moved into DPSUs as their R&D wings like BEL, BDL, HAL etc.

    [​IMG]


    +2
    As PM Narendra Modi reportedly found out when he first visited it, the new aircraft carrier lacked air defence systems when it was first delivered

    DRDO must also seed and encourage private R&D labs for joint ownership of Intellectual Properties (IP).

    The DRDO finally must be driven by commercial considerations.

    Like most design labs, their measure of achievements should be the number of Intellectual Properties they can create and sell to various companies DPSUs and private companies – Indian and foreign.

    Because the test of a technology development is how it is adopted by commercial product/ platform companies.

    Simultaneously, the network of Defence PSUs must be restructured and overhauled.

    Their status of Navratnas notwithstanding, they have to be transformed into modern, cutting edge technology companies.

    Their government linkages should give them advantages vis-a-vis access to capital but everything else should be as is for other capability driven companies in the country.

    This restructuring of DPSUs is critical to creating a starting point for the ‘Make in India’ strategy.

    Restructuring

    From this form of restructuring and leadership can emerge a new energised DRDO – a new entity called DRDO labs perhaps – at the centre of an energetic ecosystem of innovation and creativity in the security space in our country.

    This is vital for all young engineers and scientists, looking to build careers in science and technology.

    This changed DRDO, along with revitalised and reorganised DPSUs, and the energies of the private companies (domestic and foreign) are the three building blocks to Make in India successful for the defence and security sector!

    Changing the DRDO head should be the beginning of a process of restructuring and reform if the Narendra Modi Government and, especially Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar, want to shake up the defence and security sectors as part of transforming India for its future.

    The writer is a Rajya Sabha MP

    For the sake of India's security, our defence R&D capabilities need a major shake-up | Daily Mail Online
     
  8. Anish

    Anish Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    DRDO, the giant firing blanks

    [​IMG]
    Former DRDO chief Avinash Chander (Photo: PTI)
    New Delhi: The unceremonious sacking of DRDO chief Avinash Chander on January 13 well before the end of his current tenure and the shabby and graceless manner in which it was done was further compounded by the statement of defence minister Manohar Parrikar that even he came to know of this decision only through the media although he had recommended it earlier to the Appointments Committee of the Cabinet. It was suggested that the services of the DRDO chief were being abruptly terminated since the government wanted to induct someone younger from within the organisation “with an urge for development.”

    The Delhi grapevine refers to sordid intrigue and factional rivalry within the DRDO for this seemingly arbitrary and impetuous decision. However the manner in which the highest levels of governance — in this case, the Appointments Committee of the Cabinet — are being perceived in the public domain brings little credit to the Modi government.

    The relatively new defence minister has every right to appoint a new team, for the DRDO chief also functions as the scientific adviser to the minister. However, given that the NDA government had in November 2014 approved Chander’s extension till May 2016, announcing the sudden termination of his tenure reflects poorly on the texture of higher defence management. The fact that Chander is a highly respected professional and deemed to be the ‘missile man’ who delivered the Agni and recipient of various honours including the Padma award testifies to his professional competence in an unambiguous way.

    Paradoxically the defence minister’s intent — that the DRDO needs a review and shake-up — is more than timely but the fact that he chose to effect it in this manner may be counter-productive to the organisation.

    Set up in 1958 along with the departments of atomic energy and space as part of the Nehruvian blue-print for the scientific and technological development of India, the DRDO began with 10 laboratories and is now a large enterprise with over 50 labs.

    [​IMG]

    The mandate of the DRDO was to enable the Indian military in enhancing its operational capability, especially in areas where such technology from foreign sources was either unsuitable, denied or unaffordable — what former DRDO Emeritus Scientist Dr V Siddhartha refers to as the ‘triple trap’.

    The DRDO had to navigate through this adversarial domain with limited fiscal, HR and technological assets and its 56-year record is mixed and muddied. The more visible success is in the strategic domain where the Indian nuclear deterrent was enabled to a large extent by the scientific and technological eco-system nurtured by the ‘trimurti’ – the atomic energy-space-DRDO combine.

    There are other areas such as sonars, radars and electronic warfare where the DRDO has enabled the armed forces but the disappointment is with larger platforms such as the main battle tank, the light combat aircraft and the Trishul anti-missile defence system.

    In each case, the DRDO promised more than it could deliver and consequently prevented the armed forces from importing the inventory sorely needed for maintaining appropriate operational capability. While time and cost overruns in such projects are the norm in other countries as well – DRDO has not been able to win the trust and confidence of the user – the Indian military and has often played the role of a dog in the manger.

    The case of the failed Trishul surface-to-air missile is particularly deplorable and reeks of deliberate obfuscation by the DRDO with fabricated aspersions leading to an FIR being filed against the political and naval apex in 2006. The trust deficit between the military leadership and the DRDO is deep and bitter and Admiral Arun Prakash, former Naval chief, charges the institution with “intellectual dishonesty.”

    The strategic management of high technology is a complex managerial domain and is mediated as much by tangible scientific and technological acumen and capacity, as also by national culture and the collective effort to strive for excellence. India while blessed with considerable individual excellence in these domains has not burnished its manufacturing capability across the board.

    The first gunpowder factory was established in India in Ishapore in 1787 and a gun and carriage manufacturing facility in 1801. Allied operations in southeast Asia during WW II provided a tremendous boost with the setting up of ordnance factories and aircraft-overhaul facilities in India. Instead of capitalising on this sound foundation, post 1947 and the debacle of 1962, the higher national security apparatus was unable to nurture an eco-system that would ensure something as basic as an Indian-designed personal weapon.

    Nothing demonstrated this failure better than the eventual rejection of the DRDO-designed Indian Small Arms System (Insas) by the Army. Consequently more than 50 years after 1962, India, which has a uniformed constituency of almost two million (military, para-military and police), does not have appropriate indigenous design and manufacturing capacity to equip its soldiers with a modern personal weapon.

    This void is a stark reflection of the poverty of astute higher national security management; successive governments from Nehru to UPA-II have proved unable or unwilling to redress this bleak reality. Here the combined spectrum of the politician, bureaucrat, general and scientist is culpable for having taken the easy option — import or make do with the inventory deprivation.

    Progressively India’s military import bill rose and the UPA government set up the Rama Rao-led Task Force which carried out a detailed review of the DRDO and made valuable recommendations — the central one being to focus on select hi-tech weapon systems deemed critical for the military. This report has not been tabled in Parliament or discussed and remains under wraps.

    An objective and empathetic structural review of DRDO is imperative and apart from improving HR by inducting young blood — as Prime Minister Modi has directed — the entire eco-system of national design and manufacturing endeavour that includes the private sector and academia needs to become willing stake holders. This is a mammoth task and warrants perspicacious political direction.

    Dramatically sacking the DRDO chief is more symbolic than substantive as regards infusing institutional vitality.

    DRDO, the giant firing blanks
     
  9. Paliwal Warrior

    Paliwal Warrior Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  10. Paliwal Warrior

    Paliwal Warrior Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  11. Anish

    Anish Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    DRDO employees not marking their attendance

    Central government employees in various departments, including the prestigious Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), have been found to have not been marking their attendance on biometric system installed in their premises. In a fresh circular from Department of Personnel and Training (DoPT) asking department heads to direct their employees to mark attendance on biometric systems, a list of 169 offices of the central government was annexed with it.

    The list, which has been prepared by the Department of Information and Technology, showed that none out of the 540 employees of DRDO was marking attendance. The attendance number is zero for Engineer-in-Chief having 746 employees, Additional Directorate General Personnel Services with 150 strength and History Division with a staff strength of 20. All these departments function under the Ministry of Defence. Of the total of 736 registered employees in DoPT, only 576 were marking their attendances, it said. A total of 2133, 761, 750 employees respectively from Railway, Department of Revenue and Niti Ayog (though the list mentioned office name as Planning Commission) were marking their attendance electronically.

    None out of 419 employees registered with the Office of Registrar General and Census Commissioner under Home Ministry and OS Directorate (Army) with 70 registered personnel had marked their attendance through the system, as per the data. There are 2,830, 1,080 and 971 registered employees respectively in these departments. None of the 195 registered employees of National Investigation Agency (NIA) were filing their attendance through the system, it said. The Department of Electronics and Information Technology, the official record keeper for attendance of all the central government employees, recorded 78 per cent presence of employees on biometric system with 748 out of 958 using this technology. Similarly, there were many employees in various departments who were defaulting in marking attendance through the biometric system, according to the list.

    About 62 per cent employees, or 39,250 out of 63,254 registered employees, in the 169 departments were marking their attendance through the system, according to analysis of the data. . After noting these trends, the DoPT has asked secretaries of all ministries and departments to issue directions to all employees working under them to mark their attendance in Biometric Attendance System (BAS) portal on regular basis. The Centre had late last year decided to use an Aadhaar enabled biometric attendance system in all its offices, including attached or subordinate, across the country. “All employees are, therefore, required to register themselves in the system and mark their attendance. Instructions already exist for dealing with cases of late attendance or unauthorised absence, which may be followed.

    “It is requested that necessary directions may be issued to all employees to mark their attendance in BAS portal on regular basis,” an order issued by the DoPT yesterday said. The biometric attendance system is only an enabling platform. There is no change in the instructions relating to office hours, late attendance etc. which will continue to apply, according to another DoPT order. As per existing instructions, half-a-day’s casual leave should be debited for each day of late attendance, but late attendance up to an hour, on not more than two occasions in a month, and for justifiable reasons may be condoned by the competent authority. “Disciplinary action may also be taken against government servants who are habitually late. Early leaving is also to be treated in the same manner as late coming,” the instructions said. There are about 31 lakh central government employees working across the country.


    DRDO employees not marking their attendance | idrw.org

    Looks like everyone wants to follow Chander to the street

    Parrikar will do the needful

     
  12. Anish

    Anish Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Invisible planes next on DRDO's radar, thanks to Sage Bharadwaj?
    India's premier defence research organisation DRDO is open to co-developing a technology promoted by an Indian scientist who claims he can make planes invisible using pre-Mahabharata sage Bharadwaj's formulae, a senior agency official said here Friday.

    Speaking to IANS on the sidelines of the Bharatiya Vigyan Sammelan here, Satish Kumar, chief controller in-charge of research and development (technology management) at the Defence Research of Development Organisation (DRDO), said the agency was open to any technology which helps save time and cost.

    "Oh yes, we have to work together. Certainly, we are looking for such kind of a partnership in the country," said Kumar, when asked if DRDO would be open to looking at an invisibility-enhancing alloy manufactured using ancient techniques by scientist C.S.R. Prabhu, who claims it can have potential use for radar-defying stealth planes.

    Prabhu's presentation was one of the highlights of the three-day conference, which is being attended by scientists from several states, including those from the government sector.

    Prabhu, a former head of the central government's National Informatics Centre, claimed that the formulae for the alloy has been sourced from Bharadwaj's book 'Brihad Viman Shastra' and could make even planes invisible, because it absorbed 80 percent of the light.

    Kumar, who has been associated with prestigious DRDO programmes like developing liquid propellant rocket engines for Pritvi and Agni missiles, also said any available indigenous technology had to be nurtured and that technology which saved cost and times was of interest to the DRDO.

    "...wherever we see we can be benefited by technology by which we can reduce the time and cut the cost, certainly we will try to go for it," Kumar said.

    The sammelan is aimed at creating awareness about traditional indigenous sciences and linking it to more modern sciences.

    Invisible planes next on DRDO's radar, thanks to Sage Bharadwaj? | Business Standard News
     
  13. Anish

    Anish Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Govt to review decisions taken by ex-DRDO chief
    The defence ministry is likely to review the decisions taken by former Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) chief Avinash Chander towards the fag-end of his term that ended on January 31, it is learnt.

    The move comes amid allegations of victimisation by senior missile scientist RK Gupta who was relieved of his charge as project director of the nuclear-capable Agni-V missile on February 2 — two days after the missile’s first successful canister launch.

    Chander signed the order on January 9, five days before the government cut short his tenure as it wanted someone younger to man the key post. While Gupta alleged he had been victimised by Chander, DRDO officials said it was a routine transfer.

    Official sources said the ministry has decided to put Gupta’s transfer on hold for now.

    The government had approved the termination of Chander’s contract with effect from January 31 — 16 months before it was to end.


    Govt to review decisions taken by ex-DRDO chief
     
  14. Anish

    Anish Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Parrikar pulls up DRDO for delays in key projects

    Panaji: Defence minister Manohar Parrikar on Thursday bluntly told the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) that their products were not up to expectations and that several key projects undertaken by them were either behind schedule or were found to be falling short when compared to equipment sourced from foreign defence contractors.

    Parrikar's comments threw DRDO officials off guard, but the defence minister, continuing on Prime Minister Narendra Modi's call for 'Make in India', asked DRDO to buck up and develop indigenous products that matched international standards.

    Parrikar made these observations while interacting with DRDO officials on the sidelines of the launch of the fourth edition of the Bharatiya Vigyan Expo 2015 in Panaji, where he took keen interest in various projects DRDO had completed or is in the process of completing.

    When DRDO officials showcased their Quadcopter drones, Parrikar asked them how long the drones could stay in the air. To this, DRDO officials said the drones could fly up to eight hours. Parrikar shot back saying this was not enough for the armed forces. "This may be useful for police surveillance. We must develop unmanned aerial vehicles, UAVs, which can last for over 28 days." Quadcopters take a lot of energy, but UAVs consume less energy, he added.

    A case in point would be the Combat Free Fall System that DRDO supplies to the armed forces. Parrikar informed DRDO officials that the Army had brought it to his notice that imported parachutes could be used for around 100 times while the DRDO Combat Free Fall System had a life of just 40 uses.

    While the visibly nervous DRDO officials remained mum, they did point out to the TOI correspondent that their system had been in place for 20 years and till date none of the armed forces had complained and DRDO had instead received commendation for the system.

    Parrikar also directed the DRDO officials to find an alternative use for the Kaveri engine that was developed to power the Light Combat Aircraft (Tejas), which was recently shelved.

    Parrikar went to the BrahMos missile enclosure and sought to know what propellants were being used, its range, cruising speed, and was satisfied with the answers. Then he went to the enclosure of the Akash surface-to-air missile and wanted to know how it compares with Pakistan's surface-to-air missile. To this, the officials explained that there was no comparison as Pakistan's missile was short-range whereas India's was a long-range missile. Also, the payload of the Akash missile was way ahead.

    Box

    DRDO "morale low" after Chander dismissal

    The summary dismissal of Defence Research and Development Organisation chief Avinash Chander in mid-January has lowered the morale of several DRDO officials within the public sector defence unit and they find themselves at a loss, DRDO officials present at the Bharatiya Vigyan Expo 2015 said. They also added that a lack of trust between the ministry of defence and DRDO existed which was a major hurdle, but none of the officials wanted to come on record given the sensitivities.


    Parrikar pulls up DRDO for delays in key projects - The Times of India
     
  15. Anish

    Anish Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    I smell malicious intention by DRDO officials, claims former Agni V programme director RK Gupta

    New Delhi: A day after the project director of nuclear-capable Agni 5 missile programme at DRDO RK Gupta was removed, a letter has surfaced in which he has claimed that he was targeted by former DRDO chief Avinash Chander.

    "I feel dishonoured the way I was treated. I smell malicious intention. My whole family is undergoing mental agony. In case of any untoward incident or accident, I fix responsibility on Dr Avinash Chander and Dr VG Sekaran," Gupta writes in his letter.

    Gupta was removed as director of Agni V programme a day after a successful test. While DRDO sources termed the transfer as "routine", the officer alleged that he was singled out by two senior officials within the organisation including former chief Avinash Chander, who demitted his office on January 31.

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    While DRDO sources termed the transfer as "routine", the officer alleged that he was singled out by two senior officials within the organisation including former chief Avinash Chander, who demitted his office on January 31.

    #drdo #avinash chander #vg sekaran #agni v
    Gupta has complained to the Defence Ministry that he received the letter, dated January 9, only on February 2 when he reached his office after the successful launch.

    "With all humility and respect, I wish to bring to your notice that on February 2, I was relinquished from the post of project director Agni-V. I am shocked that such bad treatment is meted out to such a senior scientist with an excellent track record throughout service tenure," he said in his letter to Defence Secretary RK Mathur, who is also holding the additional charge of DRDO.

    Incidentally, Gupta's name had come up in connection with the sudden termination of Chander's contract by the government, 15 months ahead of his tenure.

    It was then rumoured that one of the reasons for Chander's removal was three complaints filed by individuals including by Gupta who has denied any such move.



    [​IMG]



    I smell malicious intention by DRDO officials, claims former Agni V programme director RK Gupta - IBNLive
     

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