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Defense Industry General News and Updates

Discussion in 'Indian Defence Industry' started by layman, Apr 18, 2017.

  1. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Jaitley praises army officials, says modernisation of defence equipment top priority
    INDIA Updated: Apr 18, 2017 08:01 IST
    IANS, New Delhi
    [​IMG]
    Defence minister Arun Jaitley.(Reuters Photo)

    Modernisation of defence equipment is the top most priority for the government, defence minister Arun Jaitley said on Monday as he addressed the Army Commanders’ Conference in New Delhi.

    The minister “complemented the senior military hierarchy” and said “whenever the challenges multiply or their nature changes, Indian Army has always outperformed itself”, an official statement said.

    Army chief General Bipin Rawat said all “systems” were working well and complimented all those who are working on the ground.

    He observed that the Indian Army continues to hold a strong image and a professional reputation and asked all ranks to endeavour to further strengthen the same.

    Top commanders of the army are meeting in the national capital from April 17-22.

    The commanders will deliberate upon the prevailing security scenario, strategic and actionable issues to ensure an effective combat edge for the army.
     
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  2. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Here's Your Chance to Bet on India's Defense Spending Spree
    by Anurag Kotoky, Abhishek Vishnoi, and Iain Marlow
    April 19, 2017, 1:00 AM GMT+4
    • Cochin Shipyard is among state-owned firms selling shares
    • Prime Minister Modi seeks to reduce dependence on arms imports
    Want to buy a stake in an aircraft-carrier builder? How about a fighter-jet maker?

    India is about to start an $11 billion sale of government assets, including holdings in the shipyard and factories that supply India’s military, offering investors a share of some of the region’s more profitable manufacturers that are benefiting from soaring defense spending.

    India is the world’s largest arms importer and Prime Minister Narendra Modi wants to change that while at the same time raising money to reduce the fiscal deficit. Among the biggest stakes to be sold are in Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd., or HAL, which is trying to build a domestic fighter, and Cochin Shipyard Ltd., currently building India’s first home-made aircraft carrier. The shipbuilder has seen profit almost double in the last five years, while earnings at most big global shipyards have slumped.

    [​IMG]
    Tugboats guide the India-built aircraft carrier INS Vikrant in Aug. 2013.

    Photographer: Manjunath Kiran/AFP via Getty Images
    As India builds its status in the region, “it will find it even more essential that it becomes self-sufficient in designing and manufacturing high-tech weapon systems," said Deepak Sinha, a consultant with the New Delhi-based Observer Research Foundation. Non-state investors can help make the arms-makers more efficient and focused, he said.

    Modi has pledged to spend $250 billion by 2025 on weapons and military equipment for a nation that has territorial disputes with Pakistan and China. India makes about 70 percent of its defense purchases abroad and has topped the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute’s list of the largest defense importers for the last seven years.

    [​IMG]
    Economic growth in Asia in the past decade is spurring countries like India, China and Indonesia to upgrade their armed forces in the face of geopolitical tensions. That’s pushed Asia-Pacific to the forefront of the growth in defense spending. The region’s military outlay rose 5.4 percent to around $436 billion in 2015, compared with a 1.7 percent increase in Europe and a drop across Africa and the Americas, according to SIPRI, although spending, as a percentage of GDP, has been in line with economic growth in these countries.

    India is also asking private equity funds to invest in profitable state-controlled companies such as helicopter maker Pawan Hans Ltd. and BEML Ltd., which makes military and mining vehicles and rail cars.

    Modi’s administration has budgeted for a 35 percent increase in earnings from asset sales in the current year, taking advantage of a stock market that just had its best three months since 2014. Modi has pledged to shrink Asia’s widest budget deficit to 3.2 percent of GDP in the year starting this month, from an estimated 3.5 percent.

    "The timing seems good as the market has started making new highs," said Deepak Mohoni, founder of market strategy firm Trendwatch India Pvt., who coined the term "Sensex" for the Mumbai stock exchange index. "Funds will pick them up."

    India has met or beaten its so-called annual disinvestment target only five times since 1998.

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    India has traditionally relied on Russian weapons, with Sukhoi and MiG fighters forming the backbone of its air strike capability. It has recently moved towards buying defense equipment from the U.S. HAL has been developing the Tejas home-made fighter jet for more than three decades, but it has yet to produce a version that plays a major role in the air force.

    The aircraft carrier that Cochin Shipyard is building for the Indian Navy forms a "significant part" of the company’s current order book, according to regulatory filings. The nation’s only existing carrier in service is a former Soviet vessel that was decommissioned by the Russians in 1996 and refitted for India a decade later.

    [​IMG]
    The INS Vikramaditya, a modified Kiev-class aircraft carrier.

    Photographer: AFP via Getty Images
    Cochin Shipyard filed regulatory papers for an IPO last month. HAL would be ready by July or August, according to Chairman T Suvarna Raju. Finance Ministry spokesman D.S. Malik declined to comment.

    India opened its defense manufacturing to private companies 15 years ago, but a lack of infrastructure for niche military manufacturing and a government preference for imported products mean the sector effectively remains a monopoly of state-run firms. Modi raised the cap on foreign ownership of defense contractors to 49 percent, from 26 percent, after he took power in 2014 with special dispensation for full ownership if the deal would bring India advanced military technology.

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    "It’s long been the aim of successive Indian governments to raise a self-sufficient, globally competitive indigenous defense industry," said Shashank Joshi, a senior research fellow at the Royal United Services Institute in London. The increased cap on foreign stakes in private Indian defense firms should help bring the private and state-run Indian firms and foreign technology closer together, he said.

    The Indian government aims to raise another 470 billion rupees selling stakes in companies in the year ending March 2019, and 400 billion rupees the following year.

    Source
     
  3. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    India’s 9 Defence Tech Startups Giving Boost To Indian Armed Forces
    Published April 20, 2017
    SOURCE: INDIAWEB2

    [​IMG]

    The Indian Startup ecosystem has been witnessing a new trend from last couple of years. Innovation which was somewhere lost in a sea of repetitiveness is now seeing a comeback in the Indian ecosystem. After making a mark in sectors like eCommerce, fintech and AI etc., the Indian Startup ecosystem is all set to take the defence sector by storm with its innovative out-of-the-box ideas.

    It is important to note that till a few years ago, the Indian defence sector was an exclusive club of large-cap companies but thanks India’s Startup Revolution in last one decade a lot of small startups entering in to the defence sector.

    While not only is the Indian startup sector finally looking at the defence sector, the latter is also warming up to the idea of inducting latest technology and gadgets in order to be at the same level as other countries. Recently, we reported that the National Security Guard (NSG), which is an Indian special forces unit under Ministry of Home Affairs, decided to induct some of the smartest gadgets and arms being used by SWAT teams and Special Forces all over the world based on the experiences it has had in preventing terror attacks and hostage situations in closed urban spaces.

    Here’s a list of India’s top 9 defence-based tech startups:

    Tonbo Imaging
    Bengaluru
    [​IMG]

    Founders: Arvind Lakshmikumar and Ankit Kumar

    A spinout of Sarnoff Corporation and Stanford Research International, Tonbo Imaging has a rich experience on a range of battlefield modernization technologies, immersive surveillance and strategic electronics for military applications. The company principals and management have global experience being principal investigators for defense and aerospace programs.

    The startup designs, builds and deploys advanced imaging and sensor systems to sense, understand and control complex environments. It offers a suite of solutions that address critical market needs in military reconnaissance, critical infrastructure security and transportation safety. The company’s offerings consist of sophisticated imaging products, custom design applications and intellectual property cores that can be licensed by OEM’s and systems integrators.

    ideaForge
    Mumbai

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    Core Team ideaForge — (L-R) with Ankit Mehta, Vipul Joshi, Amardeep Singh and Rahul Singh.

    Founders: Ankit Mehta, Rahul Singh, Ashish Bhat

    The Navi Mumbai-based startup is the brainchild of three IITians. It offers services only to the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) and paramilitary and security forces. Their clients include National Security Guard, Indo-Tibetan Border Police, National Disaster Response Force and Delhi Police.

    NETRA, which is the flagship product of ideaForge, has been developed by the company in collaboration DRDO, Ministry of Defense, India. It is a man-portable unmanned aerial vehicle which can be launched from a small clearing by the roadside and made to fly over the area of interest up to a height of 400 meters. It is capable of sending continuous real time video of every movement on ground of people, vehicles or any movement without anybody knowing that they are being seen.

    The clients of Ideaforge includes Gujarat Police, CRPF, BSF, Maharashtra Police and NDRF.

    Aadyah Aerospace
    Bengaluru
    [​IMG]

    Founders: Shaju Stephen, V Sunderarajan, Pradeep Kumar, Sabu Joseph, Amarnath Reddy, Varun Kurup

    The word ‘AADYAH’ in Sanskrit refers to the ‘original’ or ‘first power’ from which all the five elements or senses originated. True to its name, AADYAH strives to achieve greatness in all things related to aeronautics, space and defense engineering and technology solutions.

    Founded in 2016, AADYAH manufactures and develops electronic mechanical actuators, control actuation systems, and electronic optics systems for missiles and launch vehicles, and all adheres to Indian Ministry of Defence’s Defence Procurement Policy 2016 (DPP). The startup also runs a centre for excellence in design, engineering, integration and testing to develop mission-critical aerospace and defense systems.

    CM Envirosystems
    Bengaluru
    [​IMG]


    PAC series of environmental chambers, customised to integrate an electro dynamic shaker. Combined environmental and vibration tests can be conducted as per various international and military standards

    Founders: Dr. Jacob Crasta

    The company claims to be fastest growing Environmental Test Chamber manufacturers in the world. Over the years, CM Envirosystems has gained a reputation of being among the most reliable global manufacturers of Environmental Test Chambers by providing testing solutions to Aerospace, Automobile, Electrical, Electronics and Defense industries.

    The company has already created customized test chambers to test equipments of various famous projects like AGNI. It is also into providing chambers that help the defense forces in testing various weapons in extreme conditions of Siachen and Thar.

    CRON Systems
    New Delhi
    [​IMG]


    Laser Wall Technology by Cron Systems

    Founders: Tommy Katzenellenbogen, Tushar Chhabra, Saurav Agarwala

    Founded with a vision of pushing the borders with IoT, CRON Systems is a disruptive startup within the multi-billion Dollar border defence space that is developing state-of-the-art Intrusion detection systems. These systems developed by the startup implement the latest IoT technologies and designs at a fraction of the costs of other leading products in that space.

    The deep-tech company is focused on deploying cutting edge solutions for border security. The company has already bagged orders from the Border Security Force and the Indian Army to install its products to secure the international borders as well as perimeter of sensitive installations like army camps, airports etc. Some of its solutions have also been adapted for commercial markets.

    Earlier this year, the startup was in the news for raising funding from India’s premier early stage investor, YourNest.

    Aurora Integrated Systems
    Bengaluru
    [​IMG]

    Founders: Seven Graduates from IIT Kanpur

    Supported and funded by the TATA group, the startup is into developing indigenous technology, manufacturing and integrating state-of-the-art airborne systems with a focus on small Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS).

    By tailoring its systems to meet requirements ranging from wartime operations to counter-terrorism and anti-insurgency operations, the startup aims to continue serving the needs of the Armed forces and Peace Keeping forces. The startup constantly innovates in order to get a better understanding of the requirements of safe-guarding borders and securing homeland.

    It is the first company in the country that is developing UAV technology without any foreign assistance whatsoever. This particular factor is not only a factor of pride for the startup but it allows the company to pass on the economic benefits to its consumers.

    Axio Biosolutions
    Bengaluru
    [​IMG]


    Battlefield proven Military Variant of Axiostat Chitosan haemostatic dressing currently used by Army, Paramilitary of India and abroad

    Founders: Leo Mavely, Ashish Pandya

    A Medtech company focused on Advanced Wound Care products, the startup is the producer of the first haemostatic emergency dressing in India called Axiostat. The life-saving innovation is now being used by emergency service providers such as ambulances, by defense personnel such as the Indian military, and by numerous trauma and casualty care centres in hospitals.

    TimeTooth Technologies
    Noida
    [​IMG]

    Founders: Amitav Chaudhuri, Girish Mudgal and Sudhakar Medepalli

    TimeTooth Technologies is an engineering solutions company conceived with an aim of developing new products that stretch the envelope of functional performance. The firm is currently into making landing gears India’s own Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) or Drone called Rustom II.

    The 30-member company has been completely involved in designing, development and manufacture of the landing gear. The drone will be used by India’s defence forces for long range and high altitude surveillance.

    VizExperts
    New Delhi
    [​IMG]

    Founders: Praveen Bhaniramka

    A technology startup in the visual computing field, VizExperts is into developing complex turnkey solutions that simplify data to decision transformation at various organizations.

    In 2014, the startup’s digital sand model technology was inducted by the Army for real-time operation planning, enabling faster and critical decision making. Digital Sand Model is basically a revolutionary solution for operation planning, mission briefing and training, for the Indian paramilitary, police, and the armed forces.

    Another VizExperts’ service being used by the Indian army is GEORBIS. It is a 3D geospatial platform that helps the army in real- time operation planning, and enable faster and critical decision making. The platform is equipped with various interaction devices, software and terrain data to plan the operation in real-time.
     
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  4. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    An interesting trend: America has supplanted Russia as New Delhi’s primary supplier of defense materiel. Will it last?

    James Hardy
    September 11, 2014

    TweetShareShare
    [​IMG]
    In August, the Indian Ministry of Defense approved the $2.5 billion purchase of 22 Boeing AH-64E Apache attack helicopters and 15 CH-47F Chinook heavy lift helicopters. The sale still has one last hurdle—Indian Cabinet approval—but if completed it will be the latest example of a major shift in U.S.-Indo relations that in the past three years have seen Washington become India’s top defense equipment supplier.

    The approval of the Apache and Chinook deals comes about a month after Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel arrived in Delhi promising the El Dorado of defense deals: joint development and local manufacture of top-end U.S. kit.

    The deal consisted of joint development of a new version of the Javelin antitank missile and the promise of access to electromagnetic catapult technology for India’s next generation of aircraft carriers.

    Ministry of Defence (MoD) sources told IHS Jane’s that other U.S. technologies on offer included design and build of unmanned aerial vehicles, big-data systems, 127 mm naval guns and multirole helicopters for the Indian Navy.

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    "We can do more to forge a defense industrial partnership—one that would transform our nations' defense cooperation from simply buying and selling to co-production, co-development, and freer exchange of technology," Hagel said in a speech at the Observer Research Foundation in Delhi. Referring specifically to the possibility of Javelin co-development, Hagel said: "This is an unprecedented offer that we have made only to India."

    So goes the sales pitch. The interesting thing about it is that so far, U.S.-Indo defense deals have followed the tried-and-tested Foreign Military Sales (FMS) route: a government-to-government procedure that avoids negotiating pitfalls and potential corruption. It also limits the extent to which the buyer can add any sweeteners, such as the transfer of technology or local assembly options that are key to modern defense deals between developed and developing countries.


    Despite this reticence on Washington’s part, its push into the Indian market has been very successful. According to IHS Jane’s data, in 2009 India imported only $200 million in military equipment from the US; by 2013 that had jumped to $2 billion.

    This means that since 2011, the United States has supplanted Russia as New Delhi’s primary supplier of defense materiel. It is possible to argue that the United States has grasped at low-hanging fruit (and that year-by-year defense-sales numbers can be misleading as they capture big-ticket transactions, rather than long-term trends). That said, the numbers involved shouldn’t be sniffed at: Washington has offered field-tested, battle-proven aircraft (Apache, Chinook, C-130 Hercules, C-17 Globemaster) and top-end new platforms (such as the Boeing P-8I Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft) that fit local requirements and that the cash-rich Indian armed forces can afford to purchase.

    It hasn’t all gone the United States’ way: Russia may have dropped out of first place in dollar terms, but its contribution to Indian military capabilities is comprehensive and unsurpassed across all three services. Meanwhile, countries such as France, the UK, Israel and even defense-export newcomer Japan are looking to expand defense ties with New Delhi, which they expect will remain a significant player on the international market for the foreseeable future.

    India: Open for Business

    The U.S. response to this situation—Hagel’s offer of joint development and systems such as the Electro Magnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) for aircraft carriers that aren’t even in U.S. service yet—says a lot about the state of the global defense industry and India’s position within it.

    Simply put, India is the largest ‘open’ defense market in the world, accounting for nearly 10 percent of the $63 billion international defense market in 2013. It is ‘open’ because the other major markets, such as the United States, Europe, China or Russia, tend to buy local when they can. By contrast, India’s indigenous defense industry has singularly failed to keep up with local demand, forcing the MoD to look abroad to modernize its forces.

    A look at the shopping list for U.S. kit gives a reasonably straightforward view of India’s strategic priorities. C-17s, C-130s, Apaches and Chinooks allow it to resupply and reinforce forces on the Pakistani and Chinese borders, the latter, a focus of new procurements due to army plans to establish a mountain corps. This plan was also the driving force behind talks (now on hold) to buy the U.S. Marine Corps’ BAE Systems M777 howitzer , which was preferred because it could be slung under a Chinook and moved up to the border quickly

    At sea, the Indian Navy wants aircraft carriers (potentially fitted with EMALS), P-8 maritime patrol aircraft and UAVs, because it is worried about China’s intentions in the Indian Ocean region. That is not to say that the United States is the only show in town; India also has a new(ish) Russian aircraft carrier, technical assistance from Moscow for a nuclear-powered and nuclear-armed missile submarine, and all kinds of Israeli and Russian kit on its new Kolkata-class guided-missile destroyers.

    Meanwhile, the air force is happy to buy fighters from France (Dassault’s Rafale fighter beat Boeing’s F/A-18 and Lockheed Martin’s F-16 to be shortlisted for a 128-plane requirement) or Russia (such as the PAK-FA—Moscow’s stealth fighter); and although the Chinook and Apache both beat Russian competitors for their requirements, the workhorse Mi-17 ‘Hip’ is an Indian stalwart and French helicopter engineers have played a major role in helping India’s homegrown Dhruv platform off the ground.


    Delhi’s preference for kit from multiple sources has its risks: interoperability, resupply and logistics can be an issue (especially in areas like small arms and artillery ammunition), while maintaining partnerships with multiple countries can be a tough juggling act. After-sales support is another challenge: some countries have dismal reputations for servicing and spares, so even if the platform is best in class, it might become a “hangar queen” due to poor maintenance.

    That said, there is no doubt of the huge geopolitical benefits of diversifying military suppliers for the buying country. In India’s case, one has to look no further than the symbolic role that the ShinMaywa US-2i amphibious plane is playing in its “special strategic relationship” with Japan. Another example is Russia, which remains a key partner for Delhi, because it is helping to build nuclear submarines, supersonic cruise missiles and other strategic systems.


    This diversification means that although the United States is eager to cozy up to India, Delhi has plenty of other options if it so chooses. The relationship is also complicated by Indian memories of U.S. sanctions after the 1998 nuclear test, along with Washington’s long-standing military support for Pakistan.

    We Need to Talk about China


    The big question is what the United States seeks in return for its military technology transfer—and what India gets from closer ties with the United States. The answer to both of these questions could be linked to the elephant in the room—or perhaps the dragon with the shared driveway.

    As we’ve seen, India is using acquisitions from the United States and its allies to reinforce its position in the Indian Ocean region. Meanwhile, under its ‘Look East’ policy, Delhi is building alliances with China’s east Asian neighbors such as Japan and Vietnam. U.S. rhetorical appeals to India regularly emphasize the areas of commonality that differentiate the two countries from China, such as democracy, freedom of navigation and respect for international norms.

    Within India, some suspicion remains that the United States wants to draw India into some kind of anti-China containment strategy, a move that would end Delhi’s cherished nonalignment. Other Indian analysts argue that if Asia is going bipolar, then the United States is the natural country to side with, given Beijing’s “all-weather friendship” with Islamabad and the ongoing territorial dispute in eastern Jammu and Kashmir and Arunachal Pradesh, which China calls South Tibet.

    Either way, the relationship deserves monitoring. U.S. interest in India appears to be sincere, but may not survive having to work with local state-owned defense primes, which suffer from a terrible reputation for bureaucracy and high-handedness. However, if Washington—and its defense companies—can find like-minded India partners, then this could be the start of something big.

    James Hardy is the Asia-Pacific Editor of IHS Jane’s Defence Weekly. The opinions expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of IHS.
     
  5. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Some question of quality concerning Indian made. In addition to shortages, an Army official said, the quality of ammunition procured from the state-owned ordnance factories, the only source of ammunition supplies, is inferior. India does not permit the manufacturing of ammunition by the private sector. Ammunition is procured either from the ordnance factories managed by the state-owned Ordnance Factory Board (OFB) or through imports, largely from Russia.

    http://www.defensenews.com/story/de...illery-ordnance-factories-board-ofb/28003915/
     
  6. Butter Chicken

    Butter Chicken Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Private sector is now open

    India Opens $3 Billion Ammo Tender for Private Sector to Curb Import Dependency

    https://sputniknews.com/asia/201704171052715628-india-ammo-tender/
     
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  7. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Govt contracts needed to jump-start defence manufacturing in India: Airbus
    Published April 26, 2017
    SOURCE: THE HINDU

    [​IMG]

    Pierre de Bausset, Airbus India’s President and Managing Director, said the government has to start placing large-scale contracts to boost manufacturing in the defence sector. In an interview with BusinessLine, he said Airbus has offered ?5,000 crore as potential investments which will come in when it obtains defence programmes from the government. Excerpts:

    What is the update on your collaboration with Mahindra for military helicopters manufacturing?

    We want to put India on the world map for military helicopter manufacturing together with Mahindra Defence. To that effect, our partnership with Mahindra envisages creation of a private sector champion in India for manufacturing military helicopters. This includes the Naval Utility Helicopter (NUH), Reconnaissance & Surveillance Helicopter (RSH) and Naval Multi-Role Helicopter (NMRH). When released, the chapter on ‘Strategic Partnerships’ under the Defence Procurement Policy (DPP), may also influence the contours of our collaboration and offering to India.

    How is your proposal to build a final assembly line for the Panther helicopter in India developing?

    We are proposing to set up a final assembly line in India and make it the global hub for Panther helicopters. The production line will fulfil the Indian order as well as meet export demand. The proposal will materialise if we are awarded the Naval Utility Helicopter (NUH) programme.

    What is the latest on the C295W programme?

    The evaluation of our proposal to build the C295W in India with Tata is advancing. The part of the field evaluation trials we were involved in is over.

    Tell us about the growth of your defence business in India?

    ‘Make in India’ is at the heart of our business strategy and you will see that our engagement with India goes beyond just sales. There is a lot of engagement on the industrial level. On the defence side, in particular, we are offering the C295W as a replacement for the Avro aircraft. As I just said, the proposal is advancing as per the DPP. Together with Tata, the programme holds out the promise of creating a world-class private sector aircraft manufacturing capability in India within an ambitious time-frame, and nurturing a widened supplier base with an increasingly skilled workforce.

    I have already touched upon the partnership with Mahindra Defence to produce military helicopters in India. To add to that, even before we have a contract from the government, we have started working with Mahindra on an industrial level. Last year, we awarded a contract to Mahindra Aerostructures to make airframe parts for the Panther. These parts will be produced at the Mahindra facility in Bengaluru. They will be shipped to the Airbus Helicopter production line in Marignane, France, where they will be integrated with the rest of the airframe assembly and will form a critical part of the Panthers sold worldwide.

    What is the status of the Coast Guard competition for 14 twin-engine Heavy Helicopters and are you are offering a MRO for the EC725 as part of the offer?

    The EC725, now marketed globally as the H225M, has been selected by the Indian Coast Guard, and we are in the final contract stage with the customer. Yes, as part of our offer, a MRO facility to structure the Performance Based Logistics support package for these helicopters is proposed in Goa. All 14 EC725 will be re-assembled and flight-tested there. It is going to be a green-field project. The facility will include intermediate and depot level maintenance.

    What happened to the mid-air tanker deal?

    The outstanding RFP for the acquisition was withdrawn by the Ministry of Defence last year. We have no new information.

    Are you on track to achieving a target of over $2 billion worth of procurement in India till 2020 covering both civil as well as defence?

    We crossed $500 million in annual procurement from India in 2015 and had given the guidance of exceeding $2 billion in cumulative procurement in the next five years up to 2020. I can say that we are well poised to beat our own expectations.

    You said last year Airbus’ investments into India could exceed ?5,000 crore. How much of that has fructified so far?

    The figure refers to potential investments across all the defence ‘Make in India’ and industrialisation programmes we are pursuing along with our partners in India.

    How much of it fructifies depends on the programmes we receive from the Indian government. As I mentioned in my earlier responses, a number of proposals are in the pipeline. But these are not the only investments.

    How do you read the several policy announcements made by the government in boosting manufacturing in defence?

    What has been done is to lay the groundwork.

    What is needed now is for the government to award a few large scale contracts to jumpstart Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and manufacturing activity as part of ‘Make in India’ in the aerospace and defence sector.
     
  8. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Tata Safari Storme joins the Indian Armed forces’ fleet
    Published April 27, 2017
    SOURCE: INDIA TODAY

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    Tata Motors has signed a contract for supply of 3192 units of the Tata Safari Storme 4×4 to the Indian Armed Forces, under a new category of vehicles – GS800 (General Service 800). The Indian Ministry of Defence (MOD) had floated an RFP for vehicles with three basic criteria – minimum payload capacity of 800 kgs; hard roofs and air conditioning.

    Developed indigenously, the Tata Safari Storme 4×4 has completed a total trial duration of fifteen months in various terrains across the country, demonstrating supreme performance in the most demanding conditions with capabilities of coping with extreme on or off-road terrains.

    Tata Motors’ foray into Defence is progressing exactly as per the plan. First a replacement of Tatra by Tata High Mobility Vehicle 6×6 in the 10 Tonne class, and now a replacement of Maruti Gypsy by Tata Safari Storme in the 4×4 light vehicle category, reiterates Tata Motors’ position as a leading supplier of defence mobility solutions to the Indian Armed Forces.

    Vernon Noronha, Vice President, Defence and Government Business, Tata Motors Limited said, “We are very proud to have received this prestigious order for over 3000 units of the Safari Storme under the newly formed GS800 category. Tata Motors has been a leading supplier of mobility solutions to the Indian Armed Forces and this order is a testimony to our partnership with the country’s security forces.”

    Introduced in 2012, the Safari Storme boasts of superior on-road and off-road capabilities and robust all round performance, providing the customers with an un-matched driving experience. With a renewed power of 156 PS & 400 Nm torque the Storme provides easy drivability, swifter response and lower NVH (Noise, Vibration and Harshness), with superior fuel efficiency and best-in-class ground clearance of 200mm. The 4X4 variant also features ESOF (electronic shift-on-fly) technology, enabling engagement of the 4X4 or 4X2 mode on the move.

    Noronha added, “This variant of the Storme has been modified from the one available for civilians with an upgraded drive train and significantly modified suspension. The Safari Storme was conceived and designed keeping in mind the need for a rugged, comfortable and reliable vehicle, making it popular with law enforcement agencies. We will shortly commence delivery of these vehicles for the Army and Navy in a phased manner.”

    Tata Motors’ Defence Solutions offers its customers a wide range of vehicles in the light, medium and heavy category. These include Logistics, Tactical, Armoured and Specialist vehicles, with lowest life-cycle maintenance cost, supported by the company’s vast pan-India service network, ensuring maximum operational readiness.

    Tata Motors has been associated with the country’s off-road defence and security forces, since 1958 and has supplied over 1,50,000 vehicles to the Indian Military and Paramilitary forces, so far. The company offers products and services that not only meet the needs of the domestic market, but are also positioned to meet most stringent requirements across the world. Tata Motors exports its range of specialized defence vehicles to the SAARC, ASEAN and African regions. With Tata Motors’ rich portfolio in multi-axle range like 12×12, 8×8 & 6×6, the company has started supplying to leading Missile OEMs across the world. The company has also established itself as a supplier of specialist vehicles for UN peacekeeping missions.

    Tata Motors’ range of off-road vehicles are also being procured by the agencies involved in AID and Development, across the world like GSA, KBR, Oxfam, RONCO, RA International and Riders. The company also has the ability to mobilize adequate manufacturing capacity for Defence requirements, along with dedicated exclusive infrastructure, manufacturing facilities and trained man power, to ensure faster delivery of its deface and peace-keeping vehicles.
     
  9. Abingdonboy

    Abingdonboy Major Technical Analyst

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  10. Butter Chicken

    Butter Chicken Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    For some time the components will be made in India,exported to Israel for assembly and then re-imported.Full MII will start after getting license
     
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  11. Ankit Kumar 001

    Ankit Kumar 001 Major Technical Analyst

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    Get Galil ACE too.
     
  12. Bregs

    Bregs Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Punj lloyd has been vying for the defence collaboration since at least past 7-8 yrs as they have been best sited and one of the first group in pvt small scale sector to vie for defense manufacturing. and now finally got the reward

    The private sector in India is still in infancy but its moving in surely and will be huge boost to manufacture quality products without inordinate delays as in the case of DRDO, HAL
     
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  13. shaktimaan

    shaktimaan Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    now, i think there is high chance that galil will win the Indian Army tender for assault rifles
     
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  14. Gessler

    Gessler Mod MODERATOR

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    A great shot - the whole line-up of IWI offerings: CTAR-21, X-95, Galil ACE, Galatz and Negev.

    Some things to note: the CTAR-21 in foreground has a custom full-length rail system (looks like a military-grade equivalent of a 6mmProShop model, I don't think I've ever seen a non-Airsoft TAR/CTAR-21 with such a rail) and Meprolight optics. I don't recall seeing these attachments on any Tavor in Indian service before (correct me if I'm wrong). This could mean a whole bunch of new accessories will make their presence felt in the country and I hope they catch the Special Forces' eye.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  15. Abingdonboy

    Abingdonboy Major Technical Analyst

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    AFAIK this is the new production standard (full length P-rail), also note the new iteration of the X-95 is seen above with full length P-rail and quad rail (that hides behind the detachable polymor handguard):

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    As compared to all X95s in Indian service (that I have seen so far):

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
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