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Discussion & Updates on Palestinian statehood bid

Discussion in 'International Politics' started by Hembo, Sep 19, 2011.

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  1. Pagan666!

    Pagan666! 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    re: Discussion & Updates on Palestinian statehood bid

    Very good!
     
  2. Hembo

    Hembo OLD MOD STAR MEMBER

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    UN Security Council to debate Palestinian stateBy the CNN Wire Staff
    updated 5:45 AM EST, Mon September 26, 2011

    United Nations (CNN) -- The historic Palestinian bid for statehood goes before the United Nations Security Council Monday, where it looks set for a largely symbolic debate in the face of a promised American veto.

    Lebanon's Nawaf Salam, the Security Council president for this month, said he circulated the letter of application to all 15 members of the Security Council last week.

    Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas made the bid for the United Nations to recognize an independent state of Palestine on Friday, a move Israel says is premature without direct talks that address its longstanding security concerns.

    The formal application drew applause in the assembly when the Palestinian leader raised the document at the podium during his speech at the 66th annual session of the General Assembly.



    Cheers as Abbas takes stage at U.N. The time has come for a "Palestinian Spring" to join the Arab Spring in reshaping the Middle East, he said. "My people desire to exercise their right to enjoy a normal life like the rest of humanity."



    Behind Palestinian U.N. effort But Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, later taking his turn to address the General Assembly, said Palestinians are looking for a "state without peace," ignoring security concerns important to Israel.



    Palestinians bid for statehood at U.N.

    How to achieve U.N. membership He said Palestinians are not armed only with their "hopes and dreams," as Abbas said in his speech. To that he added "10,000 missiles, and Grad rockets supplied by Iran, not to mention the river of lethal weapons flowing into Gaza."

    "Palestinians should first make peace with Israel, and then get their state," he declared, adding that peace must arrive through a two-state solution that recognizes Israel as a Jewish state.

    If that occurs, Israel "will be the first" to recognize Palestinian statehood, the prime minister said.

    The move prompted a call from the Middle East "Quartet" for new peace talks designed to come up with a breakthrough by the end of next year.

    Representatives from the United Nations, the United States, Russia and the European Union discussed the request Friday and issued a statement saying the bid is now before the U.N. Security Council.

    The group called for a "preparatory meeting," to take place within one month and intended to outline how peace negotiations between Israeli and Palestinian leaders might take place. Each side would then be tasked with producing a comprehensive proposal on territory and security issues within three months, and "to have made substantial progress with six months," the statement said.

    Abbas' speech, meanwhile, provoked cheers and chants from flag-waving Palestinians who watched the address on a big-screen television in a square in Ramallah, the West Bank.

    His speech was closely watched across the Middle East. The hundreds who gathered in Ramallah greeted the news that he had formally filed the request with cheers, song and dance.

    Demonstrations took place Friday in New York and in cities across the Middle East as demonstrators waved Palestinian flags and chanted slogans in a show of solidarity.

    An increased police presence was visible in Jerusalem, where the military had stockpiled riot-control gear against the possibility of greater violence.

    U.S. President Barack Obama has said he supports Palestinian statehood, but reiterated a long-standing U.S. position that Israel must be part of the discussions.

    While a U.S. veto would block the bid for full U.N. membership, the General Assembly could still vote to upgrade the status of Palestinians, who currently hold the status of non-voting observer "entity."

    The body could change that status to permanent observer "state," identical to the Vatican's standing at the United Nations.

    Hamas, the dominant of two Palestinian political groups, has maintained that neither a U.N. application nor direct negotiations with Israel would provide the Palestinian people "with what they're looking for."

    "Abbas' emotional speech succeeded in moving people's feelings, but his description of Palestinian suffering is different from reality," said Hamas spokesman Sami Abu Zuhri.

    Hamas controls Gaza, while Abbas' Fatah organization holds the West Bank.

    --CNN's Kevin Flower and Fionnuala Sweeney contributed to this report
     
  3. Hembo

    Hembo OLD MOD STAR MEMBER

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    26 September 2011 Last updated at 04:17 GMT
    UN Security Council to consider Palestinian membership

    The UN Security Council is to begin consultations on an application by Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas for full state membership of the UN.

    The request needs the support of nine of the 15 members of the council, but the US has said it will veto the bid.

    Diplomats say it could take weeks before the issue comes to vote.

    Mr Abbas last week urged the council in New York to back a state with pre-1967 borders. Israel reiterated its call for peace talks without preconditions.

    Direct talks between Israel and the Palestinians stalled in September 2010.

    The Palestinians walked out in protest at the building of Jewish settlements in the occupied West Bank.

    In his speech at the UN, Mr Netanyahu said that the core of the conflict was not settlements, but the refusal of the Palestinians to recognise Israel as a Jewish state.

    Quartet call

    Mr Abbas received a hero's welcome upon his return to the West Bank from New York on Sunday.

    He reiterated before a cheering crowd his refusal to talk to Israel without a freeze of Jewish settlements.

    "We stressed to everyone that we want to achieve our rights through peaceful ways, through negotiations but not just any negotiations," he told thousands of people gathered at his Ramallah headquarters.

    "We will only agree with international law as a basis for negotiations, and a complete halt to settlement activity."

    Meanwhile, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu again called the Palestinians to agree to talks without preconditions.

    "You're never going to end negotiations unless you begin it," he told the BBC.

    "If we keep negotiating about the negotiations - which is what we've been doing for two-and-a-half years - we're not going to get very far."

    Last week, the Quartet of mediators - the US, the UN, the European Union and Russia - called on Israel and the Palestinians to resume peace talks within one month and aim for a deal by the end of 2012.
     
  4. Hembo

    Hembo OLD MOD STAR MEMBER

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    Analysis

    Barbara Plett

    BBC UN correspondent

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The threat of confrontation has triggered a diplomatic scramble to neutralise the effects of a possible US veto.

    The Security Council has to decide whether to refer the Palestinian request to a committee or postpone consideration of it, given the threat of an American veto.

    Both would buy time for efforts by international powers to steer the diplomatic focus away from the membership application and onto peace talks.

    But the Palestinians are not happy with proposals presented so far, and may use allies on the council to push their agenda.

    It is not clear how much support they have.

    Analysts say the council is moving into uncharted territory: it has received a membership bid from an entity that is not a state, which has both massive international support, and opposition from the world's most powerful nation.
     
  5. sahil

    sahil 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    What india is doing is right. We should support palastine. They have had enough of israelis and what america and those who oppose statehood is doing is pure hypocrisy. I think this is one of the major reason for terrorism in the world, bcoz the palestinians are denied their right in their own country and all are supporting the agressor in violation of UN resolutions also
     
  6. lucifer

    lucifer Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    ^^^^^ FYI... the East Jerusalem you are referring to... It initially belonged to Jordan before the war in '67. In which time, Israel literally begged Jordan not to join the war, but on the very 2nd day, Jordan launched itself into battle against Israel, and lost. That is when the territory of the present day Jerusalem was annexed by Israel into Jordan, which is completely acceptable. Now you are asking Israel to return it. With all due respect, not every country is like India, not every country can sign accords like the one in Simla. Israel won this land in war fairly, and even more so in a war it did not want in the first place. Israel in the past has offered the return of Gaza & West Bank (met 97% of Palestine's demands), but all was turned down by the PA, and yet people say Israel is against peace. The bitter truth is the PA is under pressure from fractions within, which would not stop until all of Israel is annihilated or under PA control/
    Israel is doing construction in its own territory, the said territory is disputed only by the PA claims which are insufficient and hence require no ceasing of construction. PA needs to come to the negotiation table to work with Israel in bringing peace to the region. Israel is carrying out settlement in its own region which should be of nobody's business. PA needs to bring down Hamas & hezbollah and come to the negotiating table with Israel and thats all that is required.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2011
  7. lucifer

    lucifer Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    Hamas official dismisses Abbas’ U.N. bid as ‘jump in the air’



    [​IMG]

    SIDON, Lebanon: A senior Hamas official dismissed Friday Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas’ decision to seek U.N. recognition of a Palestinian state as “a political jump in the air†designed to scupper an inter-Palestinian reconciliation.

    Mahmoud Zahar, a member of Hamas’ political bureau, spoke to journalists after touring the Palestinian refugee camp of Ain al-Hilweh outside Sidon. After praying at Khaled bin al-Walid Mosque in the camp, he delivered the Friday sermon and later met with parents of Palestinians killed by Israeli gunfire at the border village of Maroun al-Ras on May 15.

    Abbas’ step is “a meaningless political jump in the air. It is [designed] to torpedo the program to implement reconciliation,†Zahar said. He urged Abbas to return to the agreement reached by Hamas and its rival, the moderate Fatah movement, in Cairo a few weeks before Abbas went to the U.N. to press the Palestinian statehood bid.

    Defying U.S. and Israeli opposition, Abbas last month officially submitted a request to the U.N. for recognition of Palestine as a full member state. Addressing the U.N. General Assembly, Abbas said that “the time has come for Palestinian independence.â€

    Hamas and Fatah officials held talks in Cairo in August with the aim of implementing the reconciliation agreement that they had reached in May, ending their four-year rift. According to the pact, they must also organize elections by May 2012. Hamas and Fatah have been at odds since Gaza-based Hamas won the Palestinian parliamentary elections in January 2006.

    Zahar denied reports that Hamas was planning to move the offices of its political leadership from Syria because of the unrest there to other countries.

    Referring to the wave of popular uprisings in the Arab world, he called on Arab states to grant their peoples the right to achieve political participation and run their own affairs.

    Zahar drew a distinction between the popular uprising in Syria and revolutions in other Arab countries, saying Syria has “a special status.†He called on the Syrian leadership and people to reach agreement that achieves the objectives of the resistance program and the goals of the Syrian people.

    The Hamas official reiterated the Palestinians’ rejection of resettlement in any Arab country, but stressed that improvement of the Palestinians’ conditions in Lebanon will help them return to their homes.
     
  8. lucifer

    lucifer Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    Ramallah: The recent Quartet proposal to resume peace negotiations between Israelis and Palestinians is "positive", Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas told the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe on Thursday.
    "The proposal clearly sets terms of reference to the peace process with a focus on the two-state solution," he said. "The Palestinian UN bid was never meant to be an alternative to negotiations, but something to assist in preparing the necessary environment for serious negotiations, which can bear results," he said.
    Abbas said a total of 148 states worldwide recognised Palestine as an independent state on June 4, 1967, of which 17 states are members of the Council of Europe and 24 other European countries have advanced diplomatic relationships with Palestine with promises to recognise Palestine in the future.
    "Frankly and honestly speaking now is just the right time to do so," said Abbas. He stressed that the Israeli colonial activities in the Palestinian Territories remain the key obstacle in the way of peace, adding that the number of Israeli colonists have increased by 300 per cent since the Oslo Accord was signed in year 1994.

    "When we refuse the Israeli colonial activities, we are protecting both the Palestinian and Israeli nations from occupation and colonisation. The Israelis should make up their minds and choose between peace and colonisation," he said.
    "We have chosen peace and now it’s time for the Israelis to make a choice," he added. "Peace makes security, but the military force will never be able bring security," he said.
    He said the Israeli colonists are working in all possible ways to drag the Palestinians to the circle of violence. "I assure you that the Israeli colonists will not succeed and the Palestinians will never resort to extremism and violence," he said.
    Abbas stressed that the Palestinians can never accept the Israeli precondition of recognizing Israel as a Jewish state. “This condition is not acceptable,” he said.
    Meanwhile, the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) demanded on Thursday from the Mideast Quartet some clarifications on its latest proposal for negotiations. After meeting with UN Middle East Envoy Robert Serry at the PLO premises in Ramallah, Hanan Ashrawi, a member of the PLO Executive Committee said in a statement that the credibility of the Mideast Quartet is on the line.
    “The Quartet should come up with effective steps on the ground to make the political process more serious and credible in a way which secures the implementation of a two-state solution,” she said.
    Ashrawi questioned article No. 5 of the Quartet proposal which called upon the parties to refrain from provocative actions.
    “Does that article tackle the issue of Israeli colonial activities in the Palestinian territories?” she asked. “If that was the case, what measures can be taken to force Israel sticks to it?” she added.
    “The Palestinian side stands in urgent need for some clarifications from the Quartet on its proposal,” she said. Ashrawi said that the Palestinians also need to find out whether there was a real international will to follow up with the Israeli premeditated failure to commit, stressing the need for the existence of a referee to the question Israel on its failure to commit and impose sanctions on it.
    “We want to find whether the Mideast Quartet is willing and capable to play that role or will it go on with its role of issuing condmenations and statements which gives Israel the chance to expand its colonial activities and steal more of the Palestinian properties and water,” she said. “We will follow up with the measures on the ground and see how those measures are implemented,” she stressed.
    A PLO official told Gulf News that Palestinian demands have explicitly been mentioned in the Quartet proposal but the Palestinians are trying to highlight those demands and get them in clear terms so that Israel does not have a chance to violate the articles. The official stressed that the proposal also mentioned US President’s Obama’s speech on May 19th, which clearly based the future Palestinian state within 1967 borders.
     
  9. lucifer

    lucifer Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    Re: Hamas official dismisses Abbas’ U.N. bid as ‘jump in the air’


    [​IMG]

    (Reuters) - Iran's supreme leader rejected the Palestinians' U.N. statehood bid on Saturday, saying any deal that accepted the existence of Israel would leave a "cancerous tumour" forever threatening the security of the Middle East.

    As leader of a country under a long-standing threat of military action from Israel and the United States, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei warned the Jewish state and its allies to expect "paralysing blows" that a NATO missile shield could not prevent.

    "Any plan that seeks to divide Palestine is totally rejected," Khamenei told a conference on the Palestinian issue.

    "The two-state scheme, which has been clad in the self-righteousness of the acceptance of the Palestinian government and membership at the United Nations, is nothing but a capitulation to the demands of the Zionists or the recognition of the Zionist regime on Palestinian land," he declared.

    Israel's U.S. ally has vowed to veto the Palestinian request for full U.N. membership, now being discussed by a U.N. Security Council panel, if it goes to a vote.

    Khamenei's speech underlined Iran's support for groups that oppose Israel, including Hamas, the Islamist faction which rules the Gaza Strip and which rejected the U.N. bid presented by President Mahmoud Abbas as "begging" for statehood.

    The 72-year-old cleric also sought to portray Iran as the greatest defender of the Palestinian cause, criticising other countries in the region that have close ties to Washington. Two of these, Egypt and Jordan, have recognised Israel.

    "Governments that host Zionist embassies or economic bureaus cannot advocate support for Palestine," he said in comments aimed, among others, at post-Mubarak Egypt with which Tehran is seeking to restore the diplomatic ties cut since 1979.

    While Washington seeks to accelerate a return to Israel-Palestinian talks in order to avoid a vote on statehood, Khamenei mocked Barack Obama's support for Israel as a cynical ploy to retain the U.S. presidency at next year's election.

    "In order to remain in power you have surrendered to humiliation and to the Zionists," he said.

    Iran is pursuing a nuclear programme that the United States and Israel say aims to produce atomic bombs, a charge it denies.

    Both countries say they do not rule out pre-emptive strikes on Iran to stop it getting the bomb. Tehran says it would hit back at Israel and U.S. interests in the region and analysts say it could use allies, such as Lebanese Hezbollah, to retaliate.

    "The West must either give up its bullying policies and recognise the Palestinians' rights and avoid pursuing the Zionist regime's bullying schemes. Otherwise it will face harsher blows in the near future," Khamenei said.

    He said a NATO early-warning radar system being deployed to protect the Western alliance from attacks by countries including Iran would be ineffective.

    "What threatens the Zionist regime is not Iran's missiles or the resistance, under the pretext of which they have set up the missile shield in the region.

    "The main threat comes from the determination of those who no longer want America, Europe or their lackeys to rule over them. Of course (our) missiles will carry out their duties any time they feel a threat stemming from the enemy."
     
  10. lucifer

    lucifer Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    India Fumbles on Palestine​

    New Delhi has been far too slow to recognize that Israel ought to be a natural ally.

    With slowing economic growth, a publicly feuding cabinet, and a series of corruption scandals that have paralyzed governance, you might think the last thing India needs is a foreign policy mishap. But there's no other way to characterize New Delhi's full-throated support for Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas's dangerous grandstanding at the United Nations in pursuit of statehood.

    Instead of throwing its weight behind Israel—a natural ally with whom India shares more interests than it does with almost any other country—the left-leaning Congress Party-led government in New Delhi has publicly backed Palestinian brinkmanship on the statehood issue.

    "The Palestinian question still remains unresolved and a source of great instability and violence," declared Prime Minister Manmohan Singh at the United Nations last month. "India is steadfast in its support for the Palestinian people's struggle for a sovereign, independent, viable and united state of Palestine with East Jerusalem as its capital, living within secure and recognizable borders side by side and at peace with Israel."

    On the face of it, there's not much new in Mr. Singh's statement. India was the first non-Arab state to recognize Palestinian independence in 1988, and mouthing platitudes about support for the Palestinian cause while simultaneously deepening security and trade ties with Israel has been a hallmark of New Delhi's policy toward the region since it established full diplomatic relations with Israel in 1992. The gratuitous reference to East Jerusalem—whose final status ought to be a matter of Israeli-Palestinian negotiations rather than distant pontification—has been made before, most recently on a state visit by Mr. Singh to Saudi Arabia in 2010.

    Take a closer look, however, and India's latest pro-Palestinian tilt reveals a worsening problem. Since taking office in 2004, Mr. Singh's United Progressive Alliance government has halted what had been an upward swing in India-Israel ties by effectively starving them of public affirmation.

    [​IMG]No Israeli prime minister has visited India since Ariel Sharon in 2003, under the then-ruling Bharatiya Janata Party. The last visit to Israel by an Indian foreign minister took place more than a decade ago, also under the BJP.

    To be sure, no serious observer of Indian foreign policy sees New Delhi's diplomacy with Israel and the Arab-Muslim world as a zero-sum game. Below the radar, India-Israel relations continue to grow.

    Two-way trade has ballooned to an estimated $5 billion this year from an anemic $200 million in 1992; about half of that is in diamonds. A trip to India after compulsory military service is now a rite of passage for many young Israelis—about 40,000 of them visit India each year.

    Israeli and Indian technology and pharmaceutical firms have invested in each other's economies. And in 2008, space scientists in southern India launched Tecsar, an Israeli spy satellite reportedly aimed at improving the monitoring of Iranian military movements.

    Over the past decade Israel has emerged as one of India's biggest arms suppliers—second only to Russia by some estimates—and India in turn is one of the Israeli defense industry's largest export markets. Among India's purchases: surveillance drones, surface-to-air missiles, advanced artillery, missile defense systems, airborne radar, and sensors to track cross-border infiltration by terrorists into Indian Kashmir.

    Nonetheless, both India's decision to publicly back Mr. Abbas and the drying up of high-level political contacts—periodic visits by ministers of industry and agriculture don't count—betray an unfortunate truth. Nearly two decades after establishing diplomatic relations with Israel, India—especially the Congress Party—has yet to fully abandon either its old socialist instincts or its habit of holding a vital relationship hostage to the vagaries of domestic identity politics.

    Part of the problem is domestic politics. Muslim voters account for about 14% of India's electorate. The Congress Party tends to assume they are viscerally hostile to Israel, although this remains an untested truism of Indian politics.

    New Delhi also is trying to pander to Arab sentiment (India benefits from large remittances from Indian workers in the Gulf region, not to mention energy imports), which tends to favor Pakistan. Exacerbating these problems, the Congress Party, along with India's dwindling but still vocal communists, remains stuck in a time warp of supposed Third-World solidarity with "oppressed" Palestinians rather than understanding that as a rising power India's interests lie with democratic Israel.

    Too few mainstream Indian politicians or intellectuals are willing to publicly make what ought to be a stunningly obvious case for Israel. Both India and Israel represent ancient civilizations whose land carries a special spiritual significance for most of its people. Despite living in tough neighborhoods, both have chosen (often messy) democracy over military dictatorship—you can drive the 2,500 miles between New Delhi and Jerusalem without encountering another plural society whose leaders are regularly elected to office.

    Despite what conspiracy theorists may say, neither country has a quarrel with Islam—both house Muslim populations that enjoy more rights than their co-religionists in many places—but both are threatened by radical Islamist ideology and the terrorism it spawns. As former British colonies, India and Israel are kissing cousins of the Anglosphere, lands with distinct cultures that benefit from the liberal international order upheld by Anglo-American power.

    Nothing ought to obscure the fact that a strong Israel is fundamentally in India's interest. When the chips are down, that ought to mean support for the democratically elected government of a natural ally rather than mindless backing for its reckless adversary.
     
  11. lucifer

    lucifer Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    India's Right Decision on Palestine

    In "India Fumbles on Palestine" (op-ed, Oct. 14), Sadanand Dhume criticizes the Indian government's support for Palestinian statehood as a "foreign policy mishap" while stating, with pictures to boot, that "no Israeli prime minister has visited India since Ariel Sharon in 2003, under the then-ruling Bharatiya Janata Party. The last visit to Israel by an Indian foreign minister took place more than a decade ago, also under the BJP."

    Every government bases foreign policy on the country's best interests. Manmohan Singh's must have taken into consideration the sentiments of India's Muslim population, which is the world's second-largest and approx 14% of the population. It must have also considered the welfare of those Indian citizens, including Hindus, who work in the Gulf region.

    India's United Progressive Alliance government has chosen a mature strategy. By fostering India-Israel relations "below the radar" as Mr. Dhume writes in his article, and supporting Palestinian statehood publicly, it has shown greater sensitivity to India's rife sectarian situation.
     
  12. TereBinLaden

    TereBinLaden Captain STAR MEMBER

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    I totally don't understand why the Islamic world (in majority) don't support the existence of Israel.
     
  13. lucifer

    lucifer Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    Netanyahu slams Palestinian refusal to hold talks


    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu deplored the Palestinians' refusal to enter into direct peace talks with Israel at the upcoming international Quartet talks on Middle East peace.
    "We welcome the efforts of the Quartet to bring about direct talks with no pre-conditions, but we deplore the fact that during the Quartet meeting scheduled for October 26 such direct negotiations won't be taking place because of the opposition from the Palestinians," Netanyahu said in a statement issued by his office.
    "Only direct talks without pre-conditions can advance the peace process," Netanyahu stressed.
    Envoys of the Middle East Quartet -- the United States, the European Union, the United Nations and Russia -- will meet separately in Jerusalem October 26 with Israeli and Palestinian representatives as they seek a way forward on peace talks, the US State Department said Monday.
    "Quartet envoys will be meeting with the parties in Jerusalem on October 26 with the aim to begin preparations and develop an agenda for proceeding with the negotiations," State Department spokesman Mark Toner said in Washington, adding afterwards that "separate" meetings would be held.
    The Quartet launched an effort on September 23 to restart suspended peace negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians, acting after Palestinian president Mahmud Abbas formally submitted his request to the United Nations for Palestine to be admitted as a full member.
    The Quartet stated last month that there would be a meeting "between the parties," meaning Israelis and Palestinians sitting down face to face to hammer out an agenda and a method of proceeding in the negotiations.
    However in Washington Toner insisted that the separate meetings next week are "in keeping with the spirit of the Quartet statement."
    Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erakat, told AFP in Ramallah that he had not been officially informed of the planned meeting.
    "We have no problem with meeting individually with the Quarter," Erakat explained, but added that there was "a problem" with direct talks with Israel.
    The Palestinian Authority has said it will refuse to take part in direct talks unless Israel first freeze the building of Jewish settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem, something Netanyahu refuses to do.
    Two days earlier UN leader Ban Ki-moon had accused Israel of provoking the international community by approving new settlements in Palestinian territories while efforts were being made to jumpstart the peace talks.
     
  14. lucifer

    lucifer Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    That would be due to their blind belief in whatever is written in koran, not understanding whether that would apply to present day scenario or not...
     
  15. TereBinLaden

    TereBinLaden Captain STAR MEMBER

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    lucifer do they belief in total ethnic cleansing or do they have a plan B to relocate the Jews?
     
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