Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

Donald Trump vows 'new vetting' to weed out Islamic terrorists

Discussion in 'The Americas' started by lca-fan, Jan 28, 2017.

  1. lca-fan

    lca-fan Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2015
    Messages:
    2,287
    Likes Received:
    4,578
    Country Flag:
    India
    Donald Trump vows 'new vetting' to weed out Islamic terrorists
    Donald Trump signed a sweeping new executive order Friday to suspend refugee arrivals and impose tough new controls on travelers from seven Muslim countries.

    Making good on one of his most controversial campaign promises, and to the horror of human rights groups, Trump said he was making America safe from "radical Islamic terrorists."
    "This is big stuff," he declared at the Pentagon, after signing an order entitled: "Protection of the nation from foreign terrorist entry into the United States."


    "I'm establishing new vetting measures to keep radical Islamic terrorists out of the United States of America. Don't want them here," Trump said at the Pentagon.

    "We only want to admit those into our country who will support our country and love deeply our people," he said.
    Trump's decree Taliban in 2012, said she was "heartbroken."

    She urged Trump not to abandon the world's "most defenseless children and families."

    But the measure will be popular with Trump's nationalist base, and stops short of a threat made during last year's campaign to halt all Muslim travel to the United States.

    Trump's supporters defend the measures as necessary to prevent supporters of al-Qaida or the Islamic State group from infiltrating the US homeland disguised as refugees.

    And the State Department, which with the Department of Homeland Security will have to implement the measures, said it was ready to put them into immediate effect.

    "We will announce any changes affecting travelers to the United States as soon as that information is available," spokesman Mark Toner said.

    "We take seriously our responsibility to safeguard the American public while remaining committed to assisting the world's most vulnerable people."

    Trump, who met with the Joint Chiefs of Staff at the Pentagon, has the authority to determine how many refugees are accepted annually, and he can suspend the program at any time. Refugee processing was suspended in the immediate aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks and restarted months later.

    During the past budget year, the US accepted 84,995 refugees, including 12,587 people from Syria. President Barack Obama had set the refugee limit for this budget year at 110,000.

    Trump, according to the draft of the executive action, plans to cut that to 50,000. The draft order says that while the program is suspended, the US may admit people on a case-by-case basis "when in the national interest" and the government will continue to process refugee requests from people claiming religious persecution, "provided that the religion ... is a minority religion in the individual's country." That suggests it would allow the admission of Christians from Muslim-majority countries.

    Applauded by some in his own party, Trump's refugee action was strongly criticized by some Democrats.

    "History will judge where America's leaders stood today," said Illinois Senator Dick Durbin, ranking Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Immigration. "Faced with the humanitarian crisis of our time, the United States cannot turn its back on children fleeing persecution, genocide and terror ."
    http://m.timesofindia.com/world/us/...out-islamic-radicals/articleshow/56823986.cms
     
    PARIKRAMA, BMD and AbRaj like this.
  2. lca-fan

    lca-fan Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2015
    Messages:
    2,287
    Likes Received:
    4,578
    Country Flag:
    India
    Donald Trump acts to curb Islamic terrorism: 10 points
    [​IMG]
    Donald Trump acts to curb Islamic terrorism: 10 points
    28 Jan, 2017 , 08.58AM IST
    US President Donald Trump on Friday put a four-month hold on allowing refugees into the United States and temporarily barred visitors from Syria and six other Muslim-majority countries, saying the moves would help protect Americans from terrorist attacks. While Trump's supporters hailed the decision, it has been soundly criticized by civil rights groups. Here's what we know about the order:
    1
    The “Protecting the Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States” order imposes a 120-day suspension of the entire US Refugee Admissions Program.
    2
    It calls for a 90-day ban on the entry of immigrants and refugees from Muslim majority countries with "terrorism concerns", namely Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen for at least 30 days.
    3
    The order also suspends the Syrian refugee program, until Trump determines that changes to the program ensure that admitting Syrian refugees won't compromise national security.
    4
    However, the government will continue to process refugee requests from minority religious groups fleeing persecution, primarily Syrian Christians fleeing the civil war in Syria.
    5
    Trump said he was establishing these "new vetting measures" to keep radical Islamic terrorists out of the US. He had promised the measures - called "extreme vetting" - during last year's election campaign.
    6
    Trump's order had been expected to include a directive about setting up "safe zones" for Syrian refugees inside the country, but no such provision was included.
    7
    The draft order, which the White House said was not official, would reverse former US President Barack Obama's efforts to close the military detention center at Guantanamo Bay, a place Trump said he wants to fill up "with bad dudes".
    8
    Obama had set the refugee limit for 2017 at 110,000. Trump, according to the draft of the executive action, plans to cut that to 50,000.
    9
    The order could affect traveling green card holders, students, people coming to the US for medical care and others.
    10
    The order also included a new policy that states and localities should have a say in determining whether refugees can resettle there
     
    PARIKRAMA, Schwifty and AbRaj like this.
  3. Gessler

    Gessler Mod MODERATOR

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,570
    Likes Received:
    9,072
    Country Flag:
    India
    Just read today's Times of India and this was one of the headlines (sourced from online edition) -

    Donald Trump's ban on immigrants from Muslim countries spooks US tech industry
    Chidanand Rajghatta| TNN | Updated: Jan 28, 2017, 11.28 PM IST

    [​IMG]

    WASHINGTON: The US tech industry, substantially staffed with immigrants, was thrown into a tizzy on Friday after President Donald Trump issued executive orders temporarily barring refugees from seven Muslim-majority countries entering the US, and instituted extreme vetting+ in the case of Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Saudi Arabia.

    Although the move appeared to affect the tech industry only marginally, it was criticised among others by the chief executives of Facebook and Google -- MarkZuckerberg and Sundar Pichai -- besides many lawmakers and civil liberties activists because of possible wider fall-out.

    Google recalled scores of its immigrant staffers from foreign travels who are from countries cited by the Trump administration, amid reports of US-bound passengers being off-loaded from planes in some of the affected countries. The seven Muslim-majority countries cited by President Trump in his executive order that blocks all refugees from entering the US for 120 days are Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen. In Syria's case, the suspension is indefinite.

    In television interviews explaining the ban, Trump said travelers from Muslim-majority countries left out of the ban -- Afghanistan, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia -- will face what he called "extreme vetting," while dismissing concerns that his actions will inflame tensions in the Muslim world. "The world is as angry as it gets," the President countered. "What, you think this is going to cause a little more anger?"

    While civil libertarians reacted with fury to what was seen as a strike against American ideals of welcoming refugees and immigrants, concern in Silicon Valley centered on the fallout of the executive order on its globalized work-force, particularly if the orders are enforced randomly.

    "We're upset about the impact of this order and any proposals that could impose restrictions on Googlers and their families, or that could create barriers to bringing great talent to the US," Google CEO Sundar Pichai, an immigrant from India himself, wrote in a "Get Back to US Now" memo to employees. "It's painful to see the personal cost of this executive order on our colleagues... We've always made our view on immigration issues known publicly and will continue to do so."

    According to The Wall Street Journal, at least 187 Google employees who normally live and work in the US have been affected by the ban. "Our first order of business is to help Googlers who are affected," Pichai wrote while recalling employees who are currently abroad and might be at risk. "If you're abroad and need help please reach out to our global security team."

    [​IMG]

    Facebook's Zuckerberg also wrote in a post that that he's "concerned about the impact of the recent executive orders," while recounting that his great grandparents came from Germany, Austria and Poland, and his wife Priscilla's parents were refugees from China and Vietnam.

    "The United States is a nation of immigrants, and we should be proud of that..." he noted. "We need to keep this country safe, but we should do that by focusing on people who actually pose a threat ... We should also keep our doors open to refugees and those who need help. That's who we are."

    Trump's own paternal grandfather Frederick Trump was an immigrant from Germany, and considering his current wife and first wife were also immigrants, his supporters argue that he's only against illegal immigration, not legal immigration. But critics contend that he's on a slippery slope laid out by his right-wing advisors, notably Steve Bannon, Trump's chief strategist, who has previously expressed concern about the number of Asian CEOs in the US technology industry.

    In a November 5, 2015 interview on "Breitbart News Daily" radio show, Trump actually argued for retaining in the US - talented, high-quality people -who could build businesses and make money.

    "When someone is going to Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Stanford, all the greats... we throw them out of the country, and they can't get back in," Trump said. "I think that's terrible. We have to be careful of that, Steve. You know, we have to keep our talented people in this country."

    "When two-thirds or three-quarters of the CEOs in Silicon Valley are from South Asia or from Asia, I think..." Bannon trailed off in response. He then added: "A country is more than an economy. We're a civic society." Bannon also warned him that he would always remain to the right of Trump on the issue. "You've got to remember, we're Breitbart. We're the know-nothing Vulgarians," he said. "So we've always got to be to the right of you on this."

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...oks-us-tech-industry/articleshow/56839686.cms

    I can't help but refute some of the statements made by these CEOs & bigwigs...

    What 'great talent' is it that comes from these 7 relatively underdeveloped countries that can't be easily substituted by workers from somewhere else in the world? I reckon what Sundar bhai wanted to say was 'Cheap Talent' but couldn't because political correctness. I agree that cheap(er) labor is a prime concern for any company, but there is a time when a country cannot compromise on security because of purely corporate interests. Trump is banning travel from those states that have a high risk of Islamic terrorism. In the meantime, Google will probably have to hire from elsewhere in Asia or Eastern Europe...keeping both security & expenditure in mind.

    Ofcourse the focus is on people who pose a threat! That's why these 7 countries who are on the terror watchlist (which was prepared by the Obama administration, mind you) are under scrutiny (in addition to Af, Pak & KSA who will be subject to more stringent vetting, but no ban on them. Yet), not all Muslim countries. And what's with all these 'refugees who need help' being able-bodied men of relatively young/military-aged? Where are all the women, children & elderly? Left under a pile a debris back home while the lads go to plough German wenches? (...sorry, been replaying Witcher series)

    Also, I got this from today's TOI paper -

    ...No it's not, you Dem whore! There are some 50 Muslim-majority countries in the world and this ban is only for 7 of those - which were on the Terror Watchlist that was prepared by YOUR government (Obama/Dem). Plus, the ban uses Nationality as a determining factor, not Religion. For example if you're a Jew or Zoroastrian from Iran, you still can't enter the US as a refugee.

    @Abingdonboy @randomradio @VCheng @MilSpec @BMD @PARIKRAMA

    One thing I began to notice in recent times is that most of the Indian-origin people that are currently in high positions in the US industry are basically the DemParty's point-men. Which IMO isn't gonna serve their or the Indian diaspora's interests anymore - it's best that they revert to the position of being politically indifferent. Either way, they (or any CEO in general) has to realize that politics should shape the corporate scene, not the other way round.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2017
    arbit, Picard and PARIKRAMA like this.
  4. randomradio

    randomradio Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2013
    Messages:
    10,774
    Likes Received:
    5,742
    The CEOs are reacting to this news negatively so they won't be accused of being partial to their businesses when they start reacting to when Trump starts restricting inflow of Indian and Chinese workers. So they are taking a 'pro-American' stand rather than a 'pro-business' stand so they come out as the good guys.
     
  5. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,127
    Likes Received:
    2,923
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    He won't restrict the flow of legal Chinese and Indian workers. This ban is specific to a very specific problem, which is comprised o:

    a) The spread of conflict/terrorism; and

    b) The spread of people with values that are fundamentally opposed to ours and the affect that has on our nations.
     
    PARIKRAMA likes this.
  6. Inactive

    Inactive Guest

    Trump Redefines the Enemy and 15 years of Counterterrorism Policy

    -Greg Jaffe

    In just his first week in the White House, President Trump has sought to redefine America’s most lethal enemy in terms far broader than his post-9/11 predecessors.

    The net result of Trump’s new approach — outlined in speeches, interviews and executive orders — is a vast departure for a country that has often struggled over the past 15 years to say whether it is at war and precisely who it is fighting.

    With a few sweeping moves, Trump has answered those questions with a clarity that is refreshing to his supporters and alarming to some U.S. counterterrorism officials as well as most of the Muslim world.


    For Trump and his senior policy advisers, America is locked in a world war for its very survival, and the enemies in this wide-ranging battle are not only radical Islamist terrorists but a chaotic, violent and angry Muslim world.

    “The world is as angry as it gets,” Trump said last week from the White House. “Take a look at what’s happening with Aleppo. Take a look at what’s happening in Mosul. Take a look at what’s going on in the Middle East. . . . The world is a mess.”

    One day later, in an appearance at the Pentagon and in signing an executive order — “Protecting the Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into the United States” — Trump laid out his plan to deal with what he had described as a vast and pressing threat. He closed America’s borders to all refugees temporarily and additionally suspended the entry of anyone from Iraq, Syria and five other predominantly Muslim countries.

    “The optic of this is really awful,” said Nada Bakos, a former CIA analyst, of the refugee ban. “What they’ve done goes too far. All it does is help [Islamic State] recruiting.”

    Trump also vowed new “extreme vetting measures” to permanently keep radical Islamist terrorists out of the United States and promised to give Christians from the Middle East and other minority religions in the region priority over Muslim refugees.

    Finally, he promised to pump new money into America’s military, what he called “a great rebuilding of the armed services of the United States.”

    Both former presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama had defined the enemy in significantly narrower terms while in office, eager to avoid any moves that might make it appear as if the United States was at war with Islam.

    For Bush, the enemy was al-Qaeda and state sponsors of terrorism to include former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein, Iran and the Taliban. Obama insisted that Bush’s definition was a recipe for “endless war” and singled out an even smaller group. To him, the enemy was a series of terrorist death cults that he said were perverting the peaceful religion of Islam.

    The executive order on immigration and refugees was produced at a “frenetic pace” that included none of the interagency reviews that characterized similar orders in the Bush and Obama administrations, a senior U.S. counterterrorism official said.

    “The process was remarkable,” said the official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive internal deliberations. “Nobody in the counterterrorism community pushed for this. None of us ever asked for it.”

    Trump described the order as a key cog in an effort to prevent terrorists from entering the United States, but the policy does not affect countries such as Saudi Arabia, Pakistan or Egypt, whose citizens have launched terrorist attacks inside the United States. Not one of the 19 hijackers who struck on 9/11 came from a country targeted by the order.

    The measure drew negative responses across the world, some of which was heard by U.S. forces on the ground in the Middle East.

    U.S. commanders advising Iraqi forces reported back that their partners were mystified by the order. “It’s already flowing back,” said the senior counterterrorism official. “They are asking, ‘What do you think of us? Do you see us as the threat?’ ”

    Some Iraqi lawmakers proposed banning U.S. troops and civilians from entering Iraq — an action, if followed through, that could lead the authorities in Baghdad to turn to Russia and seek more support from Iran.

    Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif tweeted that the ban would be “recorded in history as a great gift to extremists and their supporters.”

    Trump on Saturday described the move as sensible and not aimed at any particular religious group.

    “It’s not a Muslim ban, but we were totally prepared,” he told reporters in the Oval Office. “It’s working out very nicely, you see it at the airports, you see it all over . . . and we’re going to have a very, very strict ban and we’re going to have extreme vetting, which we should have had in this country for many years.”

    The stark departure from American policy over the past 15 years is a reflection not only of Trump but the somewhat dystopian vision of his closest advisers.

    “We’re at the very beginning stages of a very brutal and bloody conflict,” said Stephen K. Bannon, Trump’s chief strategist, in a 2014 speech to a Vatican conference. “We are in an outright war against jihadist Islamic fascism and this war is . . . metastasizing far quicker than governments can handle it.”

    Michael Flynn, Trump’s national security adviser, similarly describes the fight against al-Qaeda and the Islamic State as a “world war.”

    “We could lose,” he wrote in his recent book, “The Field of Fight.” “In fact, right now we’re losing.”

    Those sorts of analyses represent a radical departure from Obama, who believed that the United States had succumbed to a “season of fear” following the 9/11 attacks that produced a disastrous war in Iraq and a betrayal of America’s core values. As commander in chief, he banned torture — a policy Trump has suggested he might revisit — and sought unsuccessfully to close the U.S. detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

    “Shameful” was the word that Obama used to describe calls from Trump and other presidential candidates to impose religious tests on refugees or immigrants.

    Obama was convinced that groups like al-Qaeda and the Islamic State did not pose an existential threat to the country. Rather, he suggested that the biggest threat came from an overreaction to the attacks that would cause the United States to turn away from the world.

    His approach stressed America’s fearlessness in the face of attacks. “That’s who the American people are — determined and not to be messed with,” Obama said in describing his counterterrorism strategy in 2013. “Now we need a strategy and a politics that reflects this resilient spirit.”

    Trump, meanwhile, has chosen a different route.

    http://www.msn.com/en-in/news/world...-policy/ar-AAmmwYy?li=AAaeRVN&ocid=spartandhp

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    An interesting read above. The most significant aspect of the whole write up is that not one of the countries that have been banned, have citizens hailing from those nations which are responsible for the spate of attacks in US itself.

    What I see here, is an attempt at trying to appear at keeping all his claims during the campaign while slowly realigning to the broader facts of the complexity of the US' WoT.

    Interesting to note that there seems to be a policy wherein the Russians may get the space to step in on first appearances. But the author clearly forgets that the Russians are financially not in a position for a long drawn out intervention in foreign lands, and an unsettled Middle East is a threat for their CAR region. If anyone thinks China will step in to fill the void, they are deluding.

    What I sense is that the US, if indeed it pushes on with this policy, aims at creating a greater unrest in the Middle East, thereby impacting the Russian and Chinese interests who have used the relative 'protection' or if I may say, the diversion provided by US to quietly carry on with furthering their interests in this region with minimal risks.

    It shall be interesting to follow up on this aspect as now I expect the Iran policy to slowly unwind, thereby my first guess of greater unrest in the Baluchistan-Sistan area thereby allowing convergence of Indian interests with US in that particular region. - and broader unrest in that region which also houses Gwadar.

    @nair @PARIKRAMA
     
    Rain Man, arbit, randomradio and 3 others like this.
  7. VCheng

    VCheng RIDER GEO STRATEGIC ANALYST

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,181
    Likes Received:
    1,788
    This situation is still evolving, but I have no doubt that due process built into the system of checks and balances will win.
     
    Blackjay likes this.
  8. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,127
    Likes Received:
    2,923
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    Well what's the alternative? You have ISIS members walking around with a dozen different IDs and no plausible way of correctly vetting people coming from that region. Even the Iraqis don't know who's ISIS and who isn't, they look for things like, recently shaven, recently cut hair and multiple IDs and having a load of cash on them.
     
    AbRaj likes this.
  9. Blackjay

    Blackjay Developers Guild Developers -IT and R&D

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2016
    Messages:
    428
    Likes Received:
    817
    Country Flag:
    India
    Judiciary will come to rescue.It already granted partial stay on some of these orders.
     
  10. randomradio

    randomradio Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2013
    Messages:
    10,774
    Likes Received:
    5,742
    If you really want to stop extremism entering the US, then you stop the Pakistanis and Saudis, not the Iraqis and Iranians.

    Sunni terrorism is the issue here. There's no point shutting out the Shias.
     
    Rain Man and lca-fan like this.
  11. VCheng

    VCheng RIDER GEO STRATEGIC ANALYST

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,181
    Likes Received:
    1,788
    Not just the judiciary, but the whole system works properly. The key test for Trump will be the economy, and the end result will be the mid-term elections. If he delivers, he will retain the house, but lose it if he does not and will therefore be shackled. Right now, people are giving him time to get his policies going so that the results can be judged.
     
    Blackjay likes this.
  12. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,127
    Likes Received:
    2,923
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    I will agree with that much on the Shias but Iraq isn't 100% Shia, or even close, and neither is Syria and unfortunately it isn't feasible to try and separate them based on Sunni or Shia. This is basically just a 'keep your local problems local, not here' policy.
     
  13. randomradio

    randomradio Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2013
    Messages:
    10,774
    Likes Received:
    5,742
    Except Iran, all other countries are in some conflict or the other.
     
  14. A_poster

    A_poster Captain FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2016
    Messages:
    1,077
    Likes Received:
    1,591
    Country Flag:
    India

    He could not lose Congress in any circumstance, due to gerrymandering. He could only lose Senate, and Democrats have an structural disadvantage going into 2018 mid-term as 3/4 of seats falling vacant are those of democrats.
     
  15. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    10,127
    Likes Received:
    2,923
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
    True but they're in a difficult situation with Iran because of Israel and Hezbollah.
     

Share This Page