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DRDO’s next: Star Wars-like weapons

Discussion in 'Indian Military Doctrine' started by Osiris, Aug 3, 2010.

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  1. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    NEW DELHI: Move aside Darth Vader and Luke Skywalker, DRDO is trying to develop its own set of Star Wars-like weapons. From laser dazzlers to control rioting crowds to high-powered lasers to destroy incoming missiles, DRDO is working on a slew of directed energy weapons (DEWs).

    "Lasers are weapons of the future. We can, for instance, use laser beams to shoot down an enemy missile in its boost or terminal phase,'' said DRDO's Laser Science & Technology Centre (LASTEC) director Anil Kumar Maini, talking to TOI on Monday.

    Incidentally, DRDO chief V K Saraswat himself has identified DEWs, along with space security, cyber-security and hypersonic vehicles, as focus areas in the years ahead. "LASTEC has the mandate to develop DEWs for armed forces,'' said DRDO's chief controller (electronics & computer sciences) R Sreehari Rao.

    While conventional weapons use kinetic or chemical energy of missiles or other projectiles to destroy targets, DEWs decimate them by bombarding with subatomic particles or electromagnetic waves at the speed of sound. Apart from the speed-of-light delivery, laser DEWs cause minimal collateral damage.

    DRDO, of course, often promises much more than it can deliver. But even the defence ministry's recent "technology perspective and capability roadmap'' identifies DEWs and ASAT (anti-satellite) weapons as thrust areas over the next 15 years, as was first reported by TOI.

    The aim is to develop laser-based weapons, deployed on airborne as well as seaborne platforms, which can intercept missiles soon after they are launched towards India in the boost phase itself. These will be part of the fledgling ballistic missile defence system being currently developed by DRDO.

    The US, incidentally, is already conducting tests of high-powered laser weapons on a modified 747 jumbo jet, the ALTB (airborne laser testbed), which direct lethal amounts of directed energy to destroy ballistic missiles during their boost phase.

    It will, of course, take India several years to even conduct such tests. For now, LASTEC is developing "a 25-kilowatt'' laser system to hit a missile during its terminal phase at a distance of 5-7 km. "All you need is to heat the missile skin to 200-300 degree and the warhead inside will detonate,'' said Maini.

    LASTEC is also working on a vehicle-mounted "gas dynamic laser-based DEW system'', under project Aditya, which should be ready in three years. "But Aditya is just a technology demonstrator to prove beam control technology. Ultimately, we have to develop solid-state lasers,'' said Maini.

    Even countries like US have now shifted their focus to the more efficient, smaller and lighter solid-state laser DEWs since chemical (dye and gas) lasers are dogged by size, weight and logistical problems.

    LASER POWER

    Non-Lethal systems:

    -- Hand-held laser dazzler to disorient adversaries, without collateral damage. 50-metre range. Status: Ready.

    -- Crowd-control dazzlers mounted on vehicles to dispel rioting mobs. 250-metre range. Status: take 2 years more.

    -- Laser-based ordnance disposal system, which can be used to neutralise IEDs and other explosives from a distance. Status: trials begin in 18 months.


    Lethal Systems:

    -- Air defence dazzlers to take on enemy aircraft and helicopters. 10-km range. Status: take 2 years more.

    -- 25-kilowatt laser systems to destroy missiles during their terminal phase. 5 to 7-km range. Status: take five years more.

    -- At least 100-kilowatt solid-state laser systems, mounted on aircraft and ships, to destroy missiles in their boost phase itself. Status: will take a decade.

    DRDO?s next: Star Wars-like weapons - India - The Times of India
     
  2. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Laser dazzlers to tackle mobs soon

    With security forces in the Kashmir valley finding it hard to contain stone pelting mobs with conventional weapons, paramilitary forces will soon be getting a new non-lethal laser system to disperse violent crowds without causing injury.

    The first of the new laser dazzlers, which use intense laser beams to disperse mobs by causing temporary blindness, will be handed over to security forces operating in Kashmir-like situations within three months.

    While the smaller hand-held dazzlers may be seen in operation in the state in the next few months, a larger vehicle borne mob control system that will be able to handle larger crows without causing permanent damage or injury is under development and is expected to be ready by the end of next year.

    The smaller hand held dazzlers, which will soon be used in the Valley, can target individuals at a range of 50 metres, the larger vehicle borne system would be able to direct the laser beam to a distance of over 250 metres. While paramilitary forces will get a limited number of the systems in three months, larger numbers would be manufactured based on their feedback.

    The system was developed by the DRDO lab after interest was expressed by security forces in Kashmir that are stuck in a ‘cycle of violence’ with mobs that do not back down with conventional efforts.

    The system is particularly efficient against stone pelters as it can be directed towards individuals, rendering them temporarily blind. “In a crowd, individual troublemakers can be identified and can be rendered temporarily disabled by using the dazzlers. It is a non-lethal system and will not cause permanent damage to the eyes,” said Anil Kumar Maini, Director of DRDO’s Laser Science and Technology Centre (LASTEC), which has developed the system.

    Laser dazzlers to tackle mobs soon
     
  3. Arjun MBT

    Arjun MBT Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    We have been hearing about KALI and DURGA projects , But has not been Brought to Public Notice as of now... Any idea If those are really ready or is Under Weaponization of It...

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2010
  4. Arjun MBT

    Arjun MBT Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    According to Barc scientists, the Kali machine has for the first time provided India a way to ''harden`` the electronic systems used in satellites and missiles against the deadly internal linkelectromagnetic impulses (Emi) generated by nuclear weapons.

    While the Kali systems built so far are single shot pulse power systems (they produce one burst of microwaves and the next burst comes much later), Kali-5000 is a rapid fire device, and hence its potential as a beam weapon.

    According to Barc-published reports, the machine will shoot several thousand bursts of microwaves, each burst lasting for just 60 billionths of a second and packed with a power of about four gigawatts.

    The high power microwave pulses travel in a straight line and do not dissipate their energy if the internal linkfrequency falls between three and ten gigahertz.

    According to Barc scientists, a microwave power of 150 megawatts has already been demonstrated in earlier versions of Kali.
     
  5. Arjun MBT

    Arjun MBT Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Another defence institute in Bangalore is using a microwave-producing version of Kali which the scientists use for testing the vulnerability of the electronic systems going into the light combat aircraft under development and designing electrostatic shields to protect them from microwave attack by the enemy.:india:
     
  6. prototype

    prototype Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    i may b going little to far,but do u people really think they r capable of taking all of this so called star war weapons(laser and crowd control dazzler) in a small time frame when they have still not developed even electro bolts
     
  7. Arjun MBT

    Arjun MBT Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    No Buddy, LASTEC has Been Developing such Items For Civilian Purpose has Not Weaponized any As of Now....

    Talking about electronic Bolts, India's Kali has a microwave power of 150 megawatts and KALI will shoot several thousand bursts of microwaves, each burst lasting for just 60 billionths of a second and packed with a power of about four gigawatts.:cool: ..... Do Not Consider Our Boys Incompetent anymore:rolleyes:
     
  8. jagjitnatt

    jagjitnatt Major ELITE MEMBER

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    Directed energy weapons are nothing new but there are some fundamental problems which doesn't allow them to be good for military use as of today.

    There are basically two types of energy weapons:

    - Electromagnetic beam (lasers etc)
    - Particle beam (proton gun etc)

    The problems with laser weapons are:

    - blooming, this is a very common problem. When a concentrated beam is emitted in air, it carries a lot of energy(usually in the magnitude of 50-500 KW. It ionizes the air and starts plasma breakdown which deflects the beam and reduces its concentration. So as the distance increases, the beam gets less effective.

    - another problem is that laser after all is an EM wave which gets effected by gravity, optical effects, and temperature. As it travels through atmosphere it faces change in density of air and also particles like clouds and fog and dust, which deflects the beam and reduces its intensity.

    - the biggest problem today is the problem of supplying so much power to the laser. A laser gun requires kilowatts of energy, and if you're trying to shoot down something in the sky miles away from you, you need energy in the range of MWs. The energy supplied can not be stored in batteries or capacitors today.


    The projects like KALI are based on particle beams which too have their share of problems. The KALI uses an electron beam which is then used to produce a microwave beam.
    Microwaves too face the same problems as that of the laser but fare a little better. But as its intensity increases so does the problems.

    We're still too far from weaponising KALI. DRDO is too ambitious. They plan to disable a missile in its initial stage (boost) by using a 100 KW laser. Recently the US demonstrated their laser weapons which used 6 lasers producing 32 KW each all working simultaneously, but could only down a UAV which flew at almost ground level.

    To destroy a missile a 1000 kms away we need a laser much more powerful. A 100 KW laser can only destroy a missile on the 30-50 km radius. No more than that.
     
  9. Arjun MBT

    Arjun MBT Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    wonderful buddy...... let me tell you jagjit... you are a walking encyclopedia buddy...... NOW How different is DURGA FROM KALI ????
     
  10. jagjitnatt

    jagjitnatt Major ELITE MEMBER

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    DURGA was a project India worked on before KALI. It is supposed to be a ray-gun weapon, as suggested by its name but ray-gun weapons haven't materialised as of yet. So I'd expect it to be a laser weapon, or a pulse laser weapons or some other electromagnetic pulse.

    It would require less energy than KALI but the burst of energy released for that minute fraction of a second would be in MWs. So some HUGE capacitors would be used which are not possible today. So its more of a weapons which would never see the light of the day. Not in the 21st century.

    We don't even know if it exists or not.
     
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  11. Arjun MBT

    Arjun MBT Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Hmnnn, I see.....Iam pretty much Enlightened After the snake Bite..lol:D ... Thanks Jagjit bhai
     
  12. MasulaSGD

    MasulaSGD FULL MEMBER

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    Excellent, this is the way to go!!!! DRDO!!! We are proud of you….:clap2:

    But… but …wait there…

    I’ve some reservations; these are not completed projects or not even currently progressing projects. Cynical mind inside me telling that this is just another usual ploy from DRDO for milking out few more crores from GOI. :rolleyes:

    Projects descriptions are just grate and names have been chosen carefully. But before dazzled by the menu, you’ve to see the kitchen.

    I had the misfortune of attended few DRDO corporate meetings, not as a participant but as a technical aid. Staff from various defense establishments present new projects for approval in these meetings. The end user, usually the military, study everything carefully and gives permission to go ahead.

    DRDO is so shoddily working, it doesn’t have people with good presentation skills forget about technical expertise. Here technical expertise doesn’t mean that particular scientist’s educational background related knowledge but complete project information to convince the end user.

    Childish PowerPoint presentations, poor communication skills, and unanswered questions these things what the end user gets here.

    The usual reaction from the Military persons is facepalm…

    But they have their obligations and limitations, finally they say… go ahead with the project, you’ll get the funds…. But we are going to purchase that technology from somewhere else…. :india:

    another facepalm…. this time from the technical aid who was sitting quietly in a corner.:(
     
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  13. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    India prepares laser-based missiles

    NEW DELHI, Aug. 31 (UPI) -- Bent on becoming a regional superpower, India is pursuing ways to develop laser-guided anti-ballistic missiles.

    Dubbed direct energy weapons and developed by the Defense Research and Development Organization, the new weapons are intended to kill incoming, hostile ballistic missiles "by bombarding them with subatomic particles or electromagnetic waves," the Defense News Web site reported.

    In a planning document written earlier this month, India's Defense Ministry said it would place what it called its highest priorities on direct energy weapons for the next 15 years. Trials of the weapons are expected within the coming years should scientists stay on schedule with the development program.

    Indian scientists say they have already begun testing. The defense dazzler was reported to be one of the first weapons put to test, engaging enemy aircraft and helicopters within a range of 6 miles.

    This system alone, Defense News reported, will be inducted into the country's defense apparatus by 2012.

    "Lasers are weapons of the future. We can, for instance, use laser beams to shoot down an enemy missile in its boost or terminal phase," The Times of India recently quoted Anil Kumar Maini, who heads the Indian Defense Research and Development Organization's Laser Science and Technology Center.

    The direct energy weapons are capable of producing 25-kilowatt pulses that can destroy intruding missiles. They are said to be considered by the Indian navy for deployment on submarines and destroyers. They may also be mounted on combat aircraft and transport planes.

    India's designs come amid efforts to establish a defense shield capable of knocking down hostile ballistic missiles.

    Should India succeed, it will join Israel, Russia and the United States in both developing and owning such defense technology.

    Although manufactured domestically, the system's tracking and fire control radars have been developed with Israel and France.

    Bent on bolstering its military might, India announced plans recently to spend up to $30 billion on its military by 2012.

    In recent months, for example, it inducted a long-range nuclear-tipped missile into its armed forces, unveiling, also, a defense spending budget spiked by 24 percent since last year.

    The moves have Pakistan fretting, with leading officials billing India's drive a "massive militarization."

    The Times of India reported that laser-based weapons would comprise one component of a wider India missile defense network now under development. The newspaper noted, however, that the country's Defense Research and Development Organization is known to make claims regarding technology that it cannot ultimately produce.

    India prepares laser-based missiles - UPI.com
     
  14. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    India's Claims of Laser Weapons: 'Nonsense' or Threat?

    (Aug. 31) -- An elaborate bluff? A case of overly optimistic technology? Or perhaps just old-fashioned boasting? Whatever the explanation, India's claims that it is on the brink of deploying advanced laser weapons is attracting attention from Pakistan.

    Defense News, a military trade publication, reported in a recent article that India was developing a variety of new energy-beam weapons, including one that "can kill incoming ballistic missiles by bombarding them with subatomic particles or electromagnetic waves."

    Other lasers under development include a laser "dazzler" weapon that could be directed at aircraft from up to 10 kilometers away or aimed at people for use as a nonlethal device. The weapons are being developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation, a government agency that develops technology and weapons for the Indian military.

    But there's a large difference between missile-destroying laser beams, which typically require large amounts of energy, and lower-powered laser dazzlers, which can be used to disorient or temporarily blind people.

    Regardless, India's archrival, Pakistan, is following the news closely. "The Indian government has decided to equip its police and paramilitary forces in the Kashmir valley with slew of 'Directed Energy Weapons,' also called 'laser dazzlers,' to tackle Kashmiri protesters," Pakistan's The Nation newspaper reported.

    U.S. scientists who have worked on military weapons expressed skepticism about India's claims. That's not surprising, since the Pentagon, for example, has invested some 30 years and billions of dollars in creating directed-energy weapons designed to shoot down ballistic missiles, and so far nothing has been deployed.

    The U.S. Air Force has worked for years on the airborne laser, a megawatt-powered chemical laser housed on a Boeing jumbo jet that successfully shot down a missile target earlier this year in a test. But the Pentagon has shelved plans to deploy the weapon, citing concerns about its feasibility.

    Laser weapons certainly have military applications, Mark Lewis, a former Air Force chief scientist, told AOL News, but he doubted that India has made a huge breakthrough in the field. "I have never seen anything to suggest they are very far along," he said.

    Peter Zimmerman, the former chief scientist of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, was equally dubious about the prospects of India possessing advanced laser weapons. "Laser dazzlers are straightforward," he told AOL News, noting that commercially available green lasers can be aimed at landing aircraft to distract the pilots.

    But missile-destroying laser weapons are less likely, he said. "Laser weapons from India?" Zimmerman asked. "Probable nonsense."

    India's Claims of Laser Weapons: 'Nonsense' or Threat?
     
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