Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

Drone strikes drone strikes and more drone strikes

Discussion in 'Modern Warfare' started by Averageamerican, Feb 16, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,379
    Country Flag:
    United States
    ..

    US missile strike kills 6 people in NW Pakistan
    By RASOOL DAWAR | Associated Press – 8 hrs ago...
    .
    MIR ALI, Pakistan (AP) — A suspected U.S. drone fired two missiles at a house in Pakistan's northwest tribal region near the Afghan border Thursday, killing six people, Pakistani intelligence officials said.

    The attack occurred in Spalga village in the North Waziristan tribal area, the main sanctuary for Taliban and al-Qaida militants in Pakistan, said the officials, speaking on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the media. The identities of those killed were unknown.

    A salvo of U.S. missiles hit a house in Spalga about a week ago as well, killing nine people, including some Pakistani Taliban militants, intelligence officials said.

    The area is dominated by Hafiz Gul Bahadur, a prominent militant commander focused on fighting foreign troops in Afghanistan.

    President Barack Obama has significantly ramped up drone attacks in Pakistan since he took office. He recently acknowledged the covert CIA-run program in Pakistan for the first time in an interview. But he and other U.S. officials refuse to discuss details of the program openly.

    Pakistani officials regularly denounce the strikes as a violation of the country's sovereignty, but the government is widely believed to have provided support for the program in the past. +6
     
  2. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    2,234
    Likes Received:
    520
    once again Thanks America...........

    I know just the thank is not enough for your Actions.............Awesome JOB.WELL DONE....



    I Think Indian gov. knows the place of NIA"s MOST wanted persons hide in Pakistan
    .........

    India Transfer the co-ordinates to US..They will do the rest..

    once again Thanks US.....................Long live US..


    One suggestion : please post all of the drone strikes in pakistan here...Mods please put it Sticky....

    Thank you,
    Sajeev
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,379
    Country Flag:
    United States
    US missiles 'kill 13' in Pakistan

    Two US drone strikes struck Islamist militants in Pakistan's tribal badlands on Thursday, killing at least 13 fighters in North Waziristan near the Afghan border, officials said.

    The aircraft fired missiles hours apart on separate targets in what is considered the premier bastion of Taliban and Al-Qaeda in Pakistan as the government in Islamabad welcomed the Afghan and Iranian leaders for a summit.

    Five militants were killed in the first attack that destroyed a compound in Spalga town near Miranshah and at least eight died in the second attack on a vehicle near the town of Mir Ali, about 25 kilometres (16 miles) to the east.

    "The death toll may rise," a Pakistani security official warned AFP after the second strike targeted militants travelling in a double cabin pick-up.

    "At least eight militants have been killed in the second strike," he said, describing them all as "foreigners".

    Another security official in Miranshah, the capital of North Waziristan, put the death toll at 12, saying they were all Uzbek Islamist fighters.

    "The vehicle caught fire and the dead bodies are badly mutilated," he added.

    The United States says Pakistan's tribal belt provides sanctuary to Taliban fighting in Afghanistan, Al-Qaeda groups plotting attacks on the West, and Pakistani Taliban who routinely bomb Pakistan and other foreign fighters.

    Those killed in the first attack were loyalists of Badar Mansoor and the Haqqani network, loyal to the Afghan Taliban whose leaders are understood to be based in North Waziristan, one of the Pakistani officials said.

    Last Thursday, officials said Mansoor, described as the "de facto leader of Al-Qaeda in Pakistan" was killed in a drone strike in North Waziristan.

    Mansoor was considered one of America's main targets in the country, wanted for bomb attacks on the minority Ahmadi sect that killed nearly 100 people in May 2010 and the chief link between Al-Qaeda and the Pakistani Taliban.

    The United States has blamed the Haqqani network for some of the most spectacular attacks carried out in Kabul, including last September's siege of the US embassy.

    On Thursday, Pakistan hosted Afghan President Hamid Karzai and Iranian leader Mahmoud Ahmadinejad for a regional summit at a key juncture in peace efforts with the Taliban.

    President Barack Obama last month confirmed for the first time that US drones target Taliban and Al-Qaeda militants on Pakistani soil, but American officials do not discuss details of the covert programme.

    According to an AFP tally, 45 US missile strikes were reported in Pakistan's tribal belt in 2009, the year Obama took office, 101 in 2010 and 64 in 2011.

    The programme has dramatically increased as the Obama administration looks to withdraw all foreign combat troops from Afghanistan by the end of 2014.

    US diplomatic cables leaked by WikiLeaks in late 2010 showed that Pakistan's civilian and military leaders privately supported US drone attacks, despite public condemnation in a country where the US alliance is hugely unpopular.

    The New America Foundation think-tank in Washington says drone strikes in Pakistan have killed between 1,715 and 2,680 people in the past eight years.

    Pakistan is reviewing its entire alliance with the United States and has kept its Afghan border closed to NATO supply convoys since the November strike.

    It ordered US personnel to leave the Shamsi air base in southwestern Pakistan, widely believed to have been a hub for the CIA drone programme, and is thought likely to only reopen the Afghan border by exacting taxes on convoys.

    6 + 7 =13
     
  4. Star Wars

    Star Wars Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2011
    Messages:
    1,027
    Likes Received:
    304
    Drone strikes are the only things attacking north Wazaristan...God knows why PA does not start operations in that Hell hole...
     
  5. DragonKnight

    DragonKnight Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2011
    Messages:
    828
    Likes Received:
    278
    what happened to 'Pakistan will take a Serious action' ?
     
  6. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,379
    Country Flag:
    United States
  7. Nirvana

    Nirvana Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,297
    Likes Received:
    664
    The title of the thread is "Kiddish"
     
  8. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,379
    Country Flag:
    United States
    DERA ISMAIL KHAN, Pakistan (Reuters) - U.S. drone aircraft struck twice in Pakistan's unruly tribal regions along the border with Afghanistan on Tuesday, killing 15 suspected militants, including two senior militant commanders, security and intelligence officials said.

    In the first strike, a drone fired missiles at a vehicle in the Birmal area of the South Waziristan tribal region, killing eight.

    Among the dead were Shams Ullah and Amir Hamza, senior commanders of a pro-government militant faction led by Maulvi Nazir, one of the most influential militant leaders in the region.

    Seven suspected militants were killed in the second attack later in the day, when a drone fired missiles at a vehicle in the Sara Khawra area, which straddles the border between North Waziristan and South Waziristan.

    Several militant groups, including the Afghan Taliban and al Qaeda, operate in Pakistan's semi-autonomous border regions, taking advantage of a porous border with Afghanistan to conduct cross-border attacks or plot violence elsewhere.

    The usually unacknowledged Central Intelligence Agency's drone program, an important element of the U.S. counter-terrorism strategy in the region, appeared to have been halted after a NATO cross-border air attack killed 24 Pakistani soldiers last November, sparking fury in Pakistan.

    The campaign, using remotely-piloted armed aircraft, resumed on January 10.

    The use of drones is opposed by most Pakistani politicians and the public, who consider drone strikes violations of sovereignty with unacceptable civilian casualties.

    Despite public opposition, Pakistan has quietly supported the program, which U.S. President Barack Obama ramped up after taking office in 2009.
     
  9. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,379
    Country Flag:
    United States
    One afternoon last fall at Fort Benning, Ga., two model-size planes took off, climbed to 800 and 1,000 feet, and began criss-crossing the military base in search of an orange, green and blue tarp.

    The automated, unpiloted planes worked on their own, with no human guidance, no hand on any control.


    Future war: Drones that talk to each other and coordinate an attack

    The Washington Post's Anqoinette Crosby talks with reporter Greg Miller about the Central Intelligence Agency's increasing role in counter-terrorism efforts. (Sept. 1)


    The rise of the drone
    U.S. assembling secret drone bases in Africa, Arabian Peninsula
    A future for drones: Automated killing
    Global race on to match U.S. drone capabilities

    After 20 minutes, one of the aircraft, carrying a computer that processed images from an onboard camera, zeroed in on the tarp and contacted the second plane, which flew nearby and used its own sensors to examine the colorful object. Then one of the aircraft signaled to an unmanned car on the ground so it could take a final, close-up look.

    Target confirmed.

    This successful exercise in autonomous robotics could presage the future of the American way of war: a day when drones hunt, identify and kill the enemy based on calculations made by software, not decisions made by humans. Imagine aerial “Terminators,” minus beefcake and time travel.

    The Fort Benning tarp “is a rather simple target, but think of it as a surrogate,” said Charles E. Pippin, a scientist at the Georgia Tech Research Institute, which developed the software to run the demonstration. “You can imagine real-time scenarios where you have 10 of these things up in the air and something is happening on the ground and you don’t have time for a human to say, ‘I need you to do these tasks.’ It needs to happen faster than that.”

    The demonstration laid the groundwork for scientific advances that would allow drones to search for a human target and then make an identification based on facial-recognition or other software. Once a match was made, a drone could launch a missile to kill the target.

    Military systems with some degree of autonomy — such as robotic, weaponized sentries — have been deployed in the demilitarized zone between South and North Korea and other potential battle areas. Researchers are uncertain how soon machines capable of collaborating and adapting intelligently in battlefield conditions will come online. It could take one or two decades, or longer. The U.S. military is funding numerous research projects on autonomy to develop machines that will perform some dull or dangerous tasks and to maintain its advantage over potential adversaries who are also working on such systems.

    The killing of terrorism suspects and insurgents by armed drones, controlled by pilots sitting in bases thousands of miles away in the western United States, has prompted criticism that the technology makes war too antiseptic. Questions also have been raised about the legality of drone strikes when employed in places such as Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia, which are not at war with the United States. This debate will only intensify as technological advances enable what experts call lethal autonomy.

    The prospect of machines able to perceive, reason and act in unscripted environments presents a challenge to the current understanding of international humanitarian law. The Geneva Conventions require belligerents to use discrimination and proportionality, standards that would demand that machines distinguish among enemy combatants, surrendering troops and civilians.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/natio...ated-killing/2011/09/15/gIQAVy9mgK_story.html
     
  10. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2011
    Messages:
    21,213
    Likes Received:
    5,716
    Country Flag:
    India
    Some much for Retaliation from Pakistan :lol:
     
  11. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,379
    Country Flag:
    United States
    To hell with Pakistan,


    General Dynamics Completes Successful Flight Demonstration of Air-Dropped Guided Mortar (Source: General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems; issued December 16, 2008) BOTHELL, Wash. --- General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems announced today that it has successfully demonstrated the ability to maneuver and guide 81mm air-dropped mortars to a stationary ground target after release from an aircraft. The guide-to-target flight tests verified the ability of the novel General Dynamics guidance system to provide a precision strike capability utilizing low-cost mortars. These test results build on previous pre-programmed maneuver flight tests successfully conducted by General Dynamics in 2007. This application for mortars was made possible through use of the company's patented Roll Controlled Fixed Canard (RCFC) flight control and guidance system. The innovative RCFC guidance system is an integral fuze and guidance-and-flight control kit that will replace current fuze hardware in existing mortars. The RCFC nose-mounted guidance kits leverage the Army's existing mortar inventory, logistics and investment to provide a cost-effective and lightweight weapons solution for unmanned guided aircraft. The guidance system employs Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation. Application of RCFC technology to 81mm air-dropped mortar guidance kits was sponsored by the U.S. Army's Armament Research Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) at Picatinny Arsenal, N.J. This successful collaboration provides Tactical Class Unmanned Aircraft System (TCUAS) operators with a low-cost, lightweight weaponization candidate for rapid fielding. (-ends-) .... So, they've gotten it down to 81mm. 60 now isn't far off. Obviously, the potential to arm even lighter UAVs is fast approaching.
     
    1 person likes this.
  12. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    2,234
    Likes Received:
    520
    Feel Happy when a US Drones strikes some Terrorists Territory................



    Good to Go US
     
  13. The enlightened

    The enlightened Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Messages:
    513
    Likes Received:
    295
    These kind of Drone strikes will not eliminate the entire terrorist network atleast. And that has roots deep inside the Pakistani administration. Currently it seems to be going well according to Pakistan's plans. NATO hasn't been able to deliver a crippling blow to terrorist networks spread far and wide and they are soon leaving, allowing the terrorists another chance to have a gala time. IMO Pakistani intelligence needs to be brought under a leash soon or it would have been all for nothing.
     
  14. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    2,234
    Likes Received:
    520

    yeah but it is a Obstacle of their Activity
     
  15. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,359
    Likes Received:
    2,379
    Country Flag:
    United States
    When the solution is simple, God is answering.”
    Albert Einstein quotes

    There are very few problems that cant be helped by high explosives.
    Average America quote.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page