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Egypt Crisis

Discussion in 'International Politics' started by layman, Jul 3, 2013.

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  1. Anees

    Anees Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Egyptians react to a television broadcast from the military at a coffee shop near Tahrir Square. Amr Nabil, A

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  2. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    He is a gonnee!!!!
     
  3. Anees

    Anees Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    A protester shouts slogans against Morsi. Amr Nabil, AP

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    Protesters ransack and burn the Muslim Brotherhood headquarters in Cairo. Demonstrators stormed the headquarters of President Mohammed Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood group as thousands of protesters prepared for a second day of mass rallies aimed at forcing the Islamist leader from power. Khalil Hamra, A

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    Protesters ransack the Muslim Brotherhood headquarters. Khalil Hamra, AP
     
  4. Anees

    Anees Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    A protester chants slogans against Morsi during a rally at Tahrir Square. Manu Brabo, AP

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    Opponents of the president protest. Khalil Hamra, AP

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    A man takes a photo under an anti-government banner depicting Morsi in Cairo. The words on the banner read, "The end of the reign of terror." Khalil Hamra, AP
     
  5. Himanshu Pandey

    Himanshu Pandey Don't get mad, get even. STAR MEMBER

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  6. Anees

    Anees Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Opponents of Morsi chant slogans as the Muslim Brotherhood headquarters burns in Alexandria, Egypt. Heba Khamis, AP

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    An opposition protester defends himself with a chair and knife during a battle with supporters of President Mohammed Morsi in Damietta. Hamada Elrasam, AP
     
  7. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Yep. He is almost finished. Once Travel ban is placed then he is not in control anymore.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2013
  8. Anees

    Anees Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Written by : Ali Ibrahim
    on : Tuesday, 2 Jul, 2013

    Opinion: A moment of change in Egypt

    Over the last two weeks, ordinary people and political elites, whether inside or outside Egypt, have wondered where the country is heading. However, the answer to this question remains ambiguous. The ever–changing nature of events on the ground ensures that nobody knows for certain. This has been the case since January 25, 2011. Nobody, including influential international powers, expected protests would be that massive or that the former regime would fall that easily. Political events continued to turn expectations, analyses and political predictions upside down.

    The Egyptian middle class who ignited the spark of January 25 revolution returned to the streets after exactly one year after the country’s first elected president came to office. It is no secret that during this year the Muslim Brotherhood suffered a severe drop in popularity. Even those who call themselves “lemon squeezers” abandoned the Brotherhood. “Lemon squeezers” is an Egyptian expression meaning those who elected the Brotherhood’s presidential candidate not out of their liking for the Islamist organization or the ideology of its candidate, but rather out of dislike of the other candidates.

    The small difference in votes between the two candidates who competed in the run-offs is a sign of the current state of polarization and division of Egyptian society. Over the last year, little has been done, particularly by the ruling authority—which is said to be represented by the Brotherhood’s executive office (known as the Guidance office)—to create a climate of agreement and public approval that would facilitate the transitional period.

    Recently, the growing tension reached its breaking point, represented by a state of deadlock between the two camps which are unable to find a middle ground. Each camp wants to prove that it is more popular and that its supporters are more willing to remain for a long time in public squares; both camps seek to attract Egyptians sitting on the sidelines who prefer to call themselves the “couch party.”

    Among the issues that have recently become a source of worry for those Egyptians who prefer to keep away from demonstrations are the problems affecting the economy and public services and the attacks against the judiciary. This is not to mention the errors committed in handling the country’s foreign policy and the deteriorating security situation in the country. Due to Egypt’s topography, internal stability has always been vital for maintaining security.

    Belittling the size of the opposition or being overconfident of the number of supporters is a fatal mistake on the part of rulers. This is something which has become obvious after seeing the massive crowds marching through Cairo and other provinces in Egypt, and the resignation of four ministers (at time of writing). This is not to mention the several governors who either resigned or could not enter their headquarters. Besides this, the constant conflict between the regime and the state institutions such as the judiciary led to the atmosphere of confrontation in the country.

    The military have issued a 48 hour ultimatum (expiring tomorrow) for the presidency to respond to the public’s needs. In fact, much of the public who previously demanded that the military intervene, approved of the statement that the General Command of the Armed Forces issued. On the other hand, there are the Brotherhood and the other Islamist trends, some of which threatened to resort to force, a thing which we hope all sides will avoid.

    Everyone, particularly the rulers, should wisely admit that the transitional period has drawn to a close and that it will yield nothing in the light of the state of polarization. Therefore, the country needs a new road map to address the mistakes committed, such as holding elections before drafting a constitution, and work to include all sides in the country’s political process.

    Besides this, the new road map should avoid compromising the country’s national identity by focusing on issues that do not concern or appeal to the public such as setting up an Islamic Caliphate. It should be acknowledged that the state institutions form the backbone of the government that should not be meddled with or undermined because such a step would violate the very principle of the state.

    It is obvious that the next 48 hours will decisively determine the course of events in Egypt which nobody can predict. However, it is certain that this is a moment of change in the political scene and all sides should act responsibly. This is a moment of change and nobody should belittle the size of the crowds or misinterpret the public approval of the military’s statement. Besides, the public interest requires that everybody should participate in forming the country’s political future.
     
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  9. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Egypt's state-run al-Ahram newspaper quotes an unnamed source as saying the army told Mr Morsi at 1900 local time today that he was no longer president - Reuters
     
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  10. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    The head of Egypt's army, General Abdul Fattah al-Sisi, suspends the constitution and announces the formation of a technocratic interim government ahead of new presidential elections.
     
  11. Y2J

    Y2J 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Mr Morsi was no longer
    president Egypt
     
  12. Himanshu Pandey

    Himanshu Pandey Don't get mad, get even. STAR MEMBER

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    2nd round of revolution is complete
     
  13. Y2J

    Y2J 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    waiting for final round.
     
  14. Rock n Rolla

    Rock n Rolla Lt. Colonel STAR MEMBER

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    Egypt army topples president, announces transition

    Egypt's armed forces overthrew elected Islamist President Mohamed Mursi on Wednesday and announced a political transition with the support of a wide range of political, religious and youth leaders.


    Egypt army commander suspends constitution.

    After a day of drama in which tanks and troops deployed near the presidential palace as a military deadline for Mursi to yield to mass protests passed, the top army commander announced on television that the president had "failed to meet the demands of the Egyptian people".

    Flanked by political and religious leaders and top generals, General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi announced the suspension of the Islamist-tinged constitution and a roadmap for a return to democratic rule under a revised rulebook.

    The president of the supreme constitutional court will act as interim head of state, assisted by an interim council and a technocratic government until new presidential and parliamentary elections are held.

    "Those in the meeting have agreed on a roadmap for the future that includes initial steps to achieve the building of a strong Egyptian society that is cohesive and does not exclude anyone and ends the state of tension and division," Sisi said in a solemn address broadcast live on state television.

    After he spoke, hundreds of thousands of anti-Mursi protesters in central Cairo's Tahrir Square erupted into wild cheering, setting off fireworks and waving flags. Cars drove around the capital honking their horns in celebration.

    But a statement published in Mursi's name on his official Facebook page after Sisi's speech said the measures announced amounted to "a full military coup" and were "totally rejected".

    The Arab world's most populous nation has been in turmoil since the fall of autocrat Hosni Mubarak as Arab Spring uprisings took hold in early 2011, arousing concern among allies in the West and in Israel, with which Egypt has a 1979 peace treaty.

    The Muslim Brotherhood president, in office for just a year, was at a Republican Guard barracks surrounded by barbed wire, barriers and troops, but it was not clear whether he was under arrest. The state newspaper Al-Ahram said the military had told Mursi at 7 p.m. (1700 GMT) that he was no longer head of state.

    "TERRORISTS AND FOOLS"

    Military chiefs, vowing to restore order in a country racked by protests over Mursi's Islamist policies, earlier issued a call to battle in a statement headlined "The Final Hours". They said they were willing to shed blood against "terrorists and fools".

    Armored vehicles took up position outside the state broadcasting headquarters on the Nile River bank, where soldiers patrolled the corridors and non-essential staff were sent home.

    In another show of force, several hundred soldiers with armored vehicles staged a parade near the presidential palace, and security sources said Mursi and the entire senior leadership of his Muslim Brotherhood were banned from leaving the country.

    Security sources told Reuters the authorities had sent a list of at least 40 leading members of the Brotherhood to airport police.

    In a last-ditch statement a few minutes before the deadline, Mursi's office said a coalition government could be part of a solution to overcome the political crisis. But opposition parties refused to negotiate with him and met instead with the commander of the armed forces.

    The Brotherhood's Egypt25 television station had broadcast live coverage of a rally of tens of thousands of Mursi supporters, even as the army moved tanks into position to prevent them from marching on the presidential palace or the Republican Guard barracks.

    U.S. oil prices rose to a 14-month high above $100 a barrel partly on fears that unrest in Egypt could destabilize the Middle East and lead to supply disruption.

    The massive anti-Mursi protests showed that the Brotherhood had not only alienated liberals and secularists by seeking to entrench Islamic rule, notably in a new constitution, but had also angered millions of Egyptians with economic mismanagement.

    Tourism and investment have dried up, inflation is rampant and fuel supplies are running short, with power cuts lengthening in the summer heat and motorists spending hours fuelling cars.

    Earlier, Mursi's spokesman said it was better that he die in defense of democracy than be blamed by history.

    "It is better for a president, who would otherwise be returning Egypt to the days of dictatorship, from which God and the will of the people has saved us, to die standing like a tree," spokesman Ayman Ali said, "Rather than be condemned by history and future generations for throwing away the hopes of Egyptians for establishing a democratic life."

    Liberal opponents said a rambling late-night television address by Mursi showed he had "lost his mind".

    The official spokesman of the Muslim Brotherhood said supporters were willing to become martyrs to defend Mursi.

    "There is only one thing we can do: we will stand in between the tanks and the president," Gehad El-Haddad told Reuters at the movement's protest encampment in a Cairo suburb that houses many military installations and is near the presidential palace.

    The country's two main religious leaders, the head of the Al-Azhar Islamic institute and the Coptic Pope, both expressed their support for the army's roadmap in speeches after Sisi, as did the main liberal opposition leader, Nobel peace laureate Mohamed ElBaradei.

    Egypt army topples president, announces transition | Reuters
     
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  15. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Morsi says 'I am Egypt's elected president'

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    CAIRO: Mohamed Morsi, who was ousted by the army on Wednesday after a week of bloodshed and massive protests, insisted he remained Egypt's president in an amateur video recording posted on the Internet.

    "I am the elected president of Egypt," the Islamist politician said in the video uploaded to YouTube.

    "It is now demanded of the people to defend this legitimacy and... for legitimacy to be constitutional," he added in reference to his election a year ago and a constitutional referendum in December.
     
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