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Emerging markets thread, their technology, their economy, and India

Discussion in 'World Economy' started by MiG-23MLD, Apr 14, 2011.

  1. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Bombardier plant in queretaro Mexico, mexicans building aircraft



    Bombardier on India and China

     
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  2. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    The NM5 aircraft is a 5-seater aircraft being developed by a joint venture between National Aerospace Laboratories [NAL] and Mahindra Aerospace Pvt Ltd as a public-private partnership venture.
    India's C-NM5 aircraft makes successful maiden flight

    a beautiful aircraft

     
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  3. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    indian navy



     
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  4. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    INDIAN ARMY's Bajaj MILITARY COMBAT, PATROL VEHICLE



    Tata Motors ARIA production facility



    Mahindra plant in Brazil
    indian cars made in brazil

     
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  5. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    .
    The Global Competitiveness Report 2011-2012 for E7


    China continues its steady progression in the rankings, rising by one rank to 26th. Indeed, it has improved its score and rank each year since 2005. The world’s most populous country continues to lead the BRICS economies by a significant margin, with South Africa—second among the BRICS—placing 50th. 24 China’s performance improves in most pillars of the GCI and is stable in the remaining ones. As in previous years, its macroeconomic situation is again very favorable (10th), despite a prolonged episode of high inflation. China is one of the world’s least indebted countries, boasts a savings rate of some 53 percent of GDP, and runs only moderate budget deficits. These factors, combined with good economic prospects, contribute to an improvement of the quality of its sovereign debt far greater than that of the other BRICS. China also achieves relatively high standards in terms of health and basic education (32nd), with positive trends in health indicators and nearly universal access to primary education, which is well assessed in terms of quality. Turning to the more sophisticated areas of competitiveness, China ranks high in business sophistication (37th) and innovation (29th), particularly when considering its level of development. On a less positive note, a number of challenges persist in the areas of corruption and judicial independence within the institutions pillar (48th). Moreover, the sentiment among businesses is that the country has become less safe over the past three years, resulting in higher costs for protection against diverse forms of crime and violence. Finally, standards of business ethics (57th) and corporate accountability (66th) are below those found in a number of other economies. As in previous years, China’s fairly poor results in the financial market development and technological readiness pillars pull down the economy’s overall competitiveness performance. However, the country improves markedly in the first of these (48th, up nine spots), thanks to an increased availability and affordability of financial services and better access to credit. It also makes strides in the technological readiness pillar (77th, up one), largely because of double-digit growth in the penetration rates of Internet use and mobile telephony.

    Indonesia drops two places this year to 46th, following an impressive improvement of 11 places over the past two years. Indonesia remains one of the best-performing countries within the developing Asia region, behind Malaysia and China yet ahead of India, Vietnam, and the Philippines. The macroeconomic environment (23rd, up 12 places) continues to improve despite rising fears of inflation. Sound fiscal management has brought the budget deficit and public debt down to very low levels, attributes that contribute to further upgrading the country’s credit rating and to raising the country’s ranking on the macroeconomic environment pillar to 23rd this year (up from 89th in 2007). The situation is also improving, albeit from a much lower base, in the area of physical infrastructure (76th, up six places), yet the quality of port facilities remains alarming and shows no sign of progress (103rd, down seven places, with a score of 3.6) and the electricity supply continues to be unreliable and scarce (98th). The assessment of public institutions continues to deteriorate, with a 10-place drop in the related pillar (71st), even though Indonesia does relatively well on selected components. Despite efforts to tackle the issue, corruption and bribery remain pervasive and are singled out by business executives as the most problematic factor for doing business in the country. Security, or the lack thereof, is again becoming a concern, and the business community assessed this indicator at levels similar to those seen in 2005 (91st). Because it is now close to entering the efficiency-driven stage of development, according to the GCI classification, Indonesia’s competitiveness increasingly depends on more complex elements, such as market efficiency. Addressing the many rigidities (120th) and inefficiencies of the labor market (94th) would ensure a more efficient allocation of labor. Additional productivity gains could be reaped by boosting technological readiness (94th), which remains very low, with slow and scant adoption of ICT by businesses and the population at large.

    South Africa moves up by four places to attain 50th position this year, remaining the highest-ranked country in sub-Saharan Africa and the second-placed among the BRICS economies. The country benefits from the large size of its economy, particularly by regional standards (it is ranked 25th in the market size pillar). It also does well on measures of the quality of institutions and factor allocation, such as intellectual property protection (30th), property rights (30th), the accountability of its private institutions (3rd), and its goods market efficiency (32nd). Particularly impressive is the country’s financial market development (4th), indicating high confidence in South Africa’s financial markets at a time when trust is returning only slowly in many other parts of the world. South Africa also does reasonably well in more complex areas such as business sophistication (38th) and innovation (41st), benefiting from good scientific research institutions (30th) and strong collaboration between universities and the business sector in innovation (26th). These combined attributes make South Africa the most competitive economy in the region. However, in order to further enhance its competitiveness the country will need to address some weaknesses. SouthAfrica ranks 95th in labor market efficiency, with rigid hiring and firing practices (139th), a lack of flexibility in wage determination by companies (138th), and significant tensions in labor-employer relations (138th). Efforts must also be made to increase the university enrollment rate of only 15 percent, which places the country 97th overall, in order to better develop its innovation potential. In addition, South Africa’s infrastructure, although good by regional standards, requires upgrading (62nd). The poor security situation remains another important obstacle to doing business in South Africa. The business costs of crime and violence (136th) and the sense that the police are unable to provide protection from crime (95th) do not contribute to an environment that fosters competitiveness. Another major concern remains the health of the workforce, which is ranked 129th out of 142 economies—the result of high rates of communicable diseases and poor health indicators more generally.

    Brazil improves five places to rank 53rd overall. The country benefits from several competitive strengths, including one of the world’s largest internal markets (10th) and a sophisticated business environment (31st), thus allowing for important economies of scale and scope. Moreover, the country has one of the most efficient financial markets (40th) and one of the highest rates of technological adoption (47th) and innovation (44th) in the region. On a less positive note, Brazil still suffers from weaknesses that hinder its capacity to fulfill its tremendous competitive potential. The lagging quality of its overall infrastructure (104th) despite its Growth Acceleration Programme (PAC), its macroeconomic imbalances (115th), the poor overall quality of its educational system (115th), the rigidities in its labor market (121st), and insufficient progress to boost competition (132nd) are areas of increasing concern.

    India ranks 56th in this year’s assessment. The country drops five places and demonstrates only minor changes in its competitiveness performance since last year.25 Among the BRICS, India continues to rank on a par with South Africa (50th) and Brazil (53rd) and ahead of Russia (66th), but its gap with China is widen-ing: the score difference between the two economies has increased sixfold between 2006 and today, the gap expanding from less than 0.1 to 0.6 points. India continues to be penalized for its mediocre accomplishments in the areas considered to be the basic factors underpinning competitiveness. The country’s supply of transport, ICT, and energy infrastructure remains largely insufficient and ill-adapted to the needs business (89th). Indeed, the Indian business community continues to cite infrastructure as the single biggest hindrance to doing business in the country. It must be noted, however, that the situation has been slowly improving since 2006, although this does not translate into a higher ranking because other countries have been improving faster. The picture is similar in the health and basic education pillar (101st). Despite improvements across the board over the past few years, public health and education quality remain a prime cause of concern. While we observe some encouraging trends in these two areas, the same cannot be said of the country’s institutions and macroeconomic environment, the other two dimensions comprising the basic requirements component of the GCI. In the past five years, discontent in the business community about the lack of reforms and the apparent inability of the government to provide a more conducive environment for business has been growing. Corruption (99th) and burdensome regulation (96th) certainly fuel this discontent. Since 2006, India’s score in the institutions pillar has plunged from 4.5 to 3.8. Once ranked a satisfactory 37th in this dimension, India now ranks 69th, having dropped 11 places this year alone. Meanwhile, the macroeconomic environment (105th) continues to be characterized by large and repeated public deficits and the highest debt-to-GDP ratio among the BRICS. More recently, the stability of the country’s macroeconomic environment is being undermined by high inflation, near or above 10 percent. As a result, India has been hovering around the 100 mark in this pillar for the past five years. Despite these considerable challenges, India does possess a number of remarkable strengths in the more advanced and complex drivers of competitiveness. This “reversed” pattern of development is characteristic of India. The country boasts a vast domestic market that allows for economies of scale and attracts investors. It can rely on a well-developed and sophisticated financial market (21st) that can channel financial resources to good use, and it boasts reasonably sophisticated (43rd) and innovative (38th) businesses.

    With one of the highest improvements in the regional rankings, moving up eight spots, Mexico occupies 58th position this year. The country’s efforts to boost competition—although it remains an important weakness (103rd)—and its regulatory improvements that facilitate entrepreneurial dynamism by reducing the number of procedures (34th) and the time (35th) required to start a business seem to be paying off, contributing to an improvement of the overall business environment. This development, coupled with the country’s traditional competitive strengths such as its large internal market size (12th), fairly good transport infrastructure (47th), sound macroeconomic policies (39th), and strong levels of technological adoption (58th) have led Mexico to improve its competitive edge. However, the country still suffers from important weaknesses that are holding back its capacity to further enhance competitiveness. Not much progress has been made in addressing the flaws in the public institutional framework (109th). Despite many efforts to fight organized crime, security concerns still exact a high price from the business community (139th). Adopting and implementing policies to boost domestic competition (107th), especially in strategic sectors such as ICT, energy, and retailing, along with additional reforms to render the labor market more efficient (114th) are still needed to increase the efficiency of the Mexican economy. Moreover, as the country continues to grow and move toward a higher stage of development and production costs rise, sustainable growth and higher wages will increasingly call for further reforms and investment to improve the educational and innovation systems. The current overall poor quality of the educational system (107th), insufficient company spending in R&D (79th), and limited innovation capacity (76th) can jeopardize the future ability of the country to compete internationally in higher-value-added sectors.

    Turkey moves up by two places this year to 59th position. The country benefits from its large market (17th), which is characterized by intense local competition (13th). Turkey also benefits from its reasonably developed infrastructure (51st), particularly roads and air transport, although ports and the electricity supply require upgrading. In order to further enhance its competitiveness, Turkey must focus on improving its human resources base through better primary education and healthcare (75th) and higher education and training (74th), increasing the efficiency of its labor market (133rd), and reinforcing the efficiency and transparency of its public institutions (86th).

    The Russian Federation drops three ranks to 66th position this year. The drop reflects the fact that an improvement in macroeconomic stability was outweighed by deterioration in other areas, notably the quality institutions, labor market efficiency, business sophistication, and innovation. The lack of progress with respect to the institutional framework is of particular concern, as this area is likely to be among the most significant constraints to Russia’s competitiveness. Strengthening the rule of law and the protection of property rights, improving the functioning of the judiciary, and raising security levels across the country would greatly benefit the economy and would provide for spillover effects into other areas. In addition to its weak institutional framework, Russia’s competitiveness remains negatively affected by the low efficiency of its goods market. Competition, both domestic as well as foreign, is stifled by market structures dominated by a few large firms, inefficient anti-monopoly policies, and restrictions on trade and foreign ownership. And despite many efforts, its financial markets remain unstable, with banks assessed very poorly (129th). Taken together, these challenges reduce the country’s ability to take advantage of some of its strengths—particularly its high innovation potential (38th for capacity for innovation), its large and growing market size (8th), and its solid performance in higher education and training (27th for the quantity of education).

    http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GCR_CountryProfilHighlights_2011-12.pdf
     
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  6. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    List of countries by credit rating

    [​IMG]

    List of countries by credit rating - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    among the major emerging economies, E7+BRICS, we find China pretty impressive with AA rating, Green, while rest of E7 economies are on almost BBB rating by most of the rating agencies in color Blue.

    E7+BRICS: China, Russia, India, Mexico, Turkey, Indonesia, Brazil + South Africa
     
  7. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    The Ford EcoSport is an exciting new car from Ford, and a very important one at that. Following on from the Figo and new Fiesta, the EcoSport is intended to take the Blue Oval to more and more customers, firmly establishing Ford as a maker of quality compact cars.



    Make no mistake, the EcoSport is a compact SUV, intended more to be at home in an urban environment, and Ford itself acknowledges this. The compact dimensions are married to high ground clearance and a commandingly high seating position, which help in negotiating the urban jungle. Such considerations are especially important in India, and don’t we know it!



    The EcoSport has been designed at Ford’s Camacari design studio in Brazil. Brazil, along with India, forms one of two production bases for the new EcoSport (a third site may be established later). The EcoSport is intended to be sold in over 100 markets worldwide, and Indian production will be exported to other markets in Asia and Africa. The styling echoes the Kinetic design philosophy, but with squarer, broader surfaces. A bold trapezoidal chromed grille forms the centre-piece of the face, flowing into a broad, ridged bonnet. The continuity in the design is emphasised by these bonnet ridges, which flow into the A-pillar, itself steeply-raked to give an impression of speed and agility. The big chrome grille is flanked by a pair of small fog lamps, which seem a little out of sorts with the overall design. The headlights are geometric too, with LED elements which may make production, but only on the higher variants.



    The wheel arches are substantial, and accentuate the stance of the car. A bold line runs down the sides, highlighting the high belt line. The B-pillars have been blacked-out, as have the D-pillars. The small glass area at the rear is supported mainly by the C-pillars, and this design gives the roof a suspended look, further adding to the lightness of the design.



    At the rear, the spare wheel mounted in the centre of the tail gate is the defining element of the design. The taillights bear resemblance to the new Fiesta’s, but are more angular, keeping in tune with the rest of the EcoSport’s look. Minus the spare wheel, the EcoSport just ducks under the 4 metre mark in length, which entitles it to an excise benefit. This no doubt will help Ford’s cause in pricing the new EcoSport competitively.Ford EcoSport will usher in new technology Upcoming cars in India 2012 & 2013
     
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  8. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    [​IMG]



    Mexican soldiers have destroyed four "narco-tanks", lorries fitted with steel armour thought to have been made for the Gulf drug cartel.

    The vehicles were seized in a garage in Camargo, in the northeastern state of Tamaulipas.

    Authorities said the cartel used the tanks, fitted with air-conditioning and steel plates, to patrol its smuggling routes and transport drugs to the US.

    Officials said their armour could only be breached with anti-tank grenades.

    BBC News - Mexican army destroys drug cartel 'narco-tanks'
     
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  9. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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  10. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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  11. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    It could be one of the best-kept secrets in the software industry. Brazil's 7.7 billion dollar IT industry is nearly as big as India's. The main difference: exports. While India exports about 70 percent of its production, Brazil exports just 1.5 percent of its country's production, even though its IT markets are much more developed. Yet that is about to change.
    The Brazilian government under President Lula has set a target of 2 billion dollars in IT exports by 2007, and it's likely to succeed. The country has all the key ingredients: a large domestic IT market, thousands of tech grads every year, and lower costs than in the US, Europe and Japan. But to achieve the target the government and the private sector are building a unique model rather than trying to replicate the success of India or Ireland. In fact, Brazil has more home grown IT solutions that either, such as a complex and efficient electronic payments system through which Brazilian banks operate, and an advanced system of e-government (most Brazilians file and pay their taxes online).
    Brazilian IT companies are focusing on the US market as the one with the most growth potential at the moment. Several are already established in the US, with offices in cities catering to the American market. Many others have been taking part in events promoting their products and services to the US, such as CTIA Wireless 2005, which is being held in New Orleans next week.
    There are of course challenges, as many in the sector admit, including language and experience. But the industry is banking on its assets

     
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  12. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Río de Janeiro— Embraer, the airplanes assembler, closed a deal with the French Group Zodiac Aerospace to create a joint-venture in Mexico that will manufacture components for Embraer 170/190 cabins, the Brazilian company informed yesterday.
    The companies would not disclose the amount of the investment or the location of the new facilities, but Embraer confirmed that this will be their first plant in Mexico.
    Artur Coutinho, Chief Operations Officer for Embraer, said that the plant in Mexico will manufacture interiors for their family of E-jets and for the airplanes of tomorrow.
    “I am very pleased with this new step in the successful long-term cooperation between Zodiac Aerospace and Embraerâ€￾, Maurice Pinault, Deputy Executive Director for Zodiac Aerospace, said.
    Embraer will establish their first plant in Mexico - Maquila Portal
     
  13. AccessDenied

    AccessDenied Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Dunno if this has been posted before....but here's an awesome video of Tata Nano Megpixel

    [video=youtube_share;BtUi-wBjZMw]http://youtu.be/BtUi-wBjZMw[/video]

    I'm certainly going to buy it as soon as it is released in India.
     
  14. AccessDenied

    AccessDenied Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    A great video on Businesses of Indian origin in the US

     
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  15. MiG-23MLD

    MiG-23MLD Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Indian car maker Tata has constructed a prototype air-powered car, that as well as looking like a massive robot ladybird might just be the next big thing in clean energy.

    The company, which built the 'world's cheapest car' and then covered it in gems and also makes terrifying war vehicles completed testing on two vehicles that are powered by compressed air back in May. A joint-venture with MDI, the prototype-stage 'AirPod' cars apparently cost just €1 per 200km, or £0.00631899077 per mile.

    Despite looking like the worm car from the Busy World of Richard Scarry, the experimental automobiles are no slouch in the speed department, clocking a speed in the vicinity of 70km/h. I wouldn't attempt a speedy corner in one if I were you, though.

    The cars seat three people, which is rather impressive for its small size, but won't win you any style points if you try cruising around town in it. Unfortunately, despite being surrounded by the substance that powers its motors, you'll still need to pull into an air-pumping station to fill it up.

    Compressed-air power is still relatively unproven, and not without disadvantages (thanks Wikipedia). For example the compressed air must be completely dehydrated, and the energy conversion involved can be an inefficient process.

    Still, I can't fault progress on any tech that could reduce our dependence on non-renewable fuels. Motor-makers are slowly moving toward more environmentally friendly vehicles, with VW mocking up a concept electric Beetle and the Nissan Leaf proving a fabulous -- if pricey -- electric motor.

    Meanwhile the Tesla Roadster is doing its best to prove that non-petrol-guzzling motors can still look a bit like the Batmobile.

    Fingers crossed Tata can make progress on its air-powered car, but in the meantime DMC is beavering away on the electric DeLorean, which boasts 35kW of power and doesn't even require a Flux capacitor to make it go. Check out the video below.Tata air-power car looks like robot ladybird, may save world | CNET UK
     
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