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Eurofighter Typhoon

Discussion in 'Europe & Russia' started by 500, Feb 27, 2011.

  1. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    When I get back to it. BTW its not my tank. Bullets nor shells come cheap.

    [​IMG]

    Though I dont want to gon about it much because as I say its not my tank.
     
  2. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    In one of the sites that Dare2 found I remember seeing a few options incase the F35 is out of the picture, Rafale was one of them.
    To be honest, Rafale winning the MMRCA looks more of a promising idea to get Rafales.

    Thats what I said, they didnt do enough on the aircraft even for 4 nations? But I have just learned that Saudi Arabia is now adding air to ground weapons at an impressive rate, thats what I heard anyway.

    Agreed.
     
  3. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  4. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Italy wants to build first Turkish fighter jet plane
    ISTANBUL - Hürriyet Daily News

    Italy has presented a proposal to Turkey in creating the country’s first fighter jet including technology transfer and establish local production, Italian Ambassador to Turkey Gianpaolo Scarente said.


    [​IMG]
    Gianpaolo Scarante talks to İpek Yezdani, a Daily News reporter at the Venice Palace in Istanbul. DAILY NEWS photo, Emrah GÃœREL

    İpek Yezdani
    ipek.yezdani@hurriyet.com.tr
    Italy has given a proposal to Turkey to build the first Turkish national fighter jet in the country, according to Italian Ambassador to Turkey Gianpaolo Scarante.

    “There is a proposal for a project. We would like to participate in a very important program to create a national fighter for Turkey. It is in the phase of evaluation of the studies right now, but we have the proposal,” Scarante told the Hürriyet Daily News in a recent interview at the Venice Palace in Istanbul.

    “The most important fighter in the world now is Eurofighter system. We would like to share with Turkey in order to cooperate to realize this important aim to have a national Turkish jet,” he said
    Scarante said since beginning cooperation with Turkey, Italy has decided to transfer technology to Turkey and delocalize the production in order to bring the industrial capability to the country.

    ‘We want to share our technology’

    “Our attitude is to cooperate in technology transfer in order to establish an industrial cooperation. So we do not only want to sell products, objects, systems, etc., but also to share technology and build together in order to improve the technology and the capability in the country,” he said.

    Scarante said this was proved with the production of the attack helicopter Agusta in Turkey.

    “Now Agusta is being built in Turkey; so if Italy wants to buy an attack helicopter, we need to buy it from Turkey,” he added.

    Italian Defense Minister to visit Turkey

    Sacarante said Italian Minister of Defense Giampaolo Di Paola will be visiting Turkey in two weeks time. Italy and Turkey held “defense industry days” in Italian capital Rome from Jan. 26 to 28, where Italian and Turkish companies discussed business opportunities in meetings held in the Center for High Defense Studies (CASD).

    More than 30 Italian companies including Finmeccanica and leading Turkish companies such as Aselsan, TAI, Roketsan and Havelsan attended the meetings. Sacarante said the aim of the “Italy-Turkey defense days” was to support the cooperation between the two countries in the field of defense.
    [HH] Long history of cooperation

    “There are a lot of cooperation projects in the defense sector between Italy and Turkey. We have a very long history of cooperation. For the time being, we have a very good cooperation in satellite industry,” he said. Cooperation extended to air traffic control systems and the main control system control was being built in Ankara, he added.

    Italy and Turkey have the same vision of the problems regarding the Arab spring countries, he said.
    “Italian Foreign Minister Giulio Terzi di Sant’Agata made his first foreign visit to Turkey just 15 days after he was appointed, and is constantly in contact with Davutoğlu regarding the developments in the region.”

    Italy also has close contact with Turkey for evaluation of the situation in Syria day by day and “creation of a buffer zone is also being discussed between allies,” Sacarante said.

    “We have to have a stable, democratic Syria and stop the violence there. We’re in favor of all the measures that can lead to consensus on the Syrian issue.”
    February/04/2012

    http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/it...plane.aspx?pageID=238&nID=12988&NewsCatID=344
     
  5. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Eurofighter flying in scotland.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 12, 2014
  6. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    URGENT

    British defence delegation to visit India

    Last Updated : 04 Feb 2012 11:51:34 AM IST

    NEWDELHI: A week after the Eurofighter Typhoon lost out to French Dasault Rafale for a mega contract to supply 126 fighter jets, a high-powered delegation of 20 British defence companies will be visiting India on Monday, in a bid to make business inroads into the world’s largest defence markets.


    The $10.2 billion contract to supply 126 fighter jets was won by Dassault Aviation’s Rafale after outbidding Eurofighter Typhoon on January 31. It had led to much hand-wringing in London, with British Prime Minister David Cameron assuring his MPs that he will do everything possible to ensure that the Indian government “reconsidered” its decision. The UK is part of the four-nation consortium that developed and promoted the Eurofighter typhoon.The Indian decision will certainly hang over the six-day visit of the delegation, led by UK Defence Minister for International Security Strategy Gerald Howarth.

    British defence delegation to visit India | Eurofighter Typhoon | Dassault Rafale | The New Indian Express

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    Oh ship!
     
  7. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Huddersfield MP Barry Sheerman demands Commons debate after India’s Eurofighter snub

    by Barry Gibson, Huddersfield Daily ExaminerFeb 4 2012inShare.

    0 HUDDERSFIELD’S MP has slammed India for a “bombshell” decision not to buy fighter jets from Britain.

    Barry Sheerman is angry that the South Asian country this week announced it preferred the French-built Rafale over the British Eurofighter for a £7bn contract to build 126 planes.

    Mr Sheerman demanded an urgent debate on the issue in Parliament on Thursday.

    The Huddersfield MP asked House of Commons leader Sir George Young: “May I press the Leader of the House on the absolute bombshell for British manufacturing industry that we may not get the Eurofighter contract with India?

    “Is it not about time that the House showed our constituents that we care about the manufacturing sector by having an urgent debate on the subject?”

    Sir George replied: “We believe that the Eurofighter Typhoon offered the most comprehensive offer on technology transfer, industrial participation, and security of supply.”


    Read More Huddersfield MP Barry Sheerman demands Commons debate after India’s Eurofighter snub - Local West Yorkshire News - News - Huddersfield Examiner

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    OH SHIP
     
  8. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  9. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  10. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  11. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  12. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  13. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  14. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  15. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Prince deployed as Falklands dispute warms up

    Argentina worried about "militarisation" of conflict with "colonialist" UK in intensifying war of words over islands.
    Chris Arsenault Last Modified: 04 Feb 2012 17:40

    [​IMG]

    There is something amusing - and just plain strange - about hearing the UK’s prime minister accuse Argentina of taking a "colonialist" attitude over the disputed Falkland/Malvinas islands.

    The sun has, of course, set on the British Empire’s extensive colonies, but that hasn’t stopped David Cameron, and his Argentinian counterpart, from ratcheting up the nationalist rhetoric.

    "In the 21st century, [Britain] continues to be a crude colonial power in decline," Argentina’s President Cristina Kirchner said recently, branding Prime Minister David Cameron’s allegations of Argentinian colonialism an expression of "mediocrity and stupidity".

    Formally considered an overseas dependency of Britain, the Falklands - a set of islands known to Argentines as Islas Malvinas - are about the size of the US state of Connecticut with a population of 3,000 and an economy worth some $170m per year.

    Most of the islands’ population reportedly wants to remain part of Britain, though Argentina says residents were placed there by the UK when it re-established its claim to the islands, 480km off Argentina's south Atlantic coast, in 1832-33.

    High stakes

    With a UK-based firm exploring for petroleum in waters off the islands, and Argentines still smarting from their defeat in the 1982 Falklands war, the stakes are getting bizarrely high.

    "They [Argentina’s government] may just feel that national pride demands a ratcheting up of action," Lawrence Freedman, professor of war studies at King’s College in London, told Al Jazeera. "You can get into dangerous territory," he said, but conceded that the possibility of another war was remote.


    Argentina and UK in new Falklands dispute


    As if purposefully playing on colonial imagery worthy of the 19th century, rather than the 21st, Britain announced that the Duke of Cambridge - otherwise known as Prince William - recently arrived on the islands to work as a search-and-rescue pilot with the Royal Air Force.

    Argentina’s foreign ministry condemned the move as a "provocation" saying the prince would be arriving "in the uniform of the conquistador". The UK government denied any connection between the prince’s visit and recent tensions.

    This isn't the first time Britain's royal family has been so closely involved with the islands. Prince Andrew, the Duke of York, served as a naval helicopter co-pilot during the 1982 war, taking part in anti-submarine warfare and missile decoy operations, among others.

    This year marks the 30th anniversary of Argentina’s forces being routed, after the country's former military government sent poorly trained conscripts to invade the island.

    The 74 days of fighting, ending when Argentina surrendered in June 1982, claimed the lives of three islanders, 648 Argentine military personnel and 255 British troops.

    Stephen Badsey, a professor at the University of Wolverhampton who studies the Falklands war, said he was shocked by the "ineptness of the Argentinian military in miscalculating the British response".

    Domestic concerns

    The actions of Argentinian’s military junta, however, could have been linked more to domestic politics than to any real desire to control the islands. Three days before the invasion, Argentina’s labour unions had planned a mass demonstration against the dictatorship.

    The current sabre rattling from politicians carries the same hallmarks of nationalist rhetoric amid tough economic circumstances which precipitated the 1982 conflict.

    "The Malvinas/Falklands dispute provides a way of uniting nations that are politically divided," said Carolina Acosta-Alzuru, an Argentinian-born professor of public relations at the University of Georgia. This idea of war, distracting people from pressing domestic policies and even changing "some budgetary agendas" is not unique to the Falklands, she said.

    "I don’t think there's [ever] a conflict or war that isn't related to domestic politics."

    While Argentina was ruled by a violent junta, which wanted to deflect popular attention from its human rights record, the UK faced its own problems in 1982, as strikes gripped the country.

    Today, Argentinian leaders believe the same dynamic is occurring. The UK's moves are linked to "British domestic politics, with high unemployment", Amado Boudou, Argentina’s vice-president, said on Thursday. "This is an attempt to cover for a government that has a low level of accomplishment."

    The 1982 Falklands war was like 'two bald men fighting over a comb'

    - Jorge Luis Borges, Argentinian poet



    Britain's Royal Navy is sending one of its most powerful warships, the HMS Dauntless - armed with 48 Sea Viper missiles - to the Falklands, in what Argentinian officials believe to be a militarisation of the war of words.

    "It can shoot down Argentine fighters as soon as they take off from their bases," a UK navy source told the conservative-leaning Telegraph newspaper. "This will give Buenos Aires serious pause for thought."

    In the past week, protesters in the Argentine capital have spray painted British banks and other multinational companies, including HSBC.

    Oil and nationalism

    Oil is often cited as the economic underpin inspiring conflict. On February 1, Borders & Southern Petroleum announced that it had started a 45-day exploratory process in the waters off the islands.

    But some analysts believe nationalism, not undiscovered oil, is the main issue.

    "One of the mistakes made in 1982 … was the belief by some members of the US State Department that the conflict could not really be about issues of international law and sovereignty, and that the oil issue must play a significant part in it," Badsey told Al Jazeera.

    "This misperception by the United States may have played a part in the failure of their attempts to resolve the conflict before major combat operations began. It is to be hoped and expected that no-one will make this mistake a second time."


    Oil row revives Falklands tensions


    Jorge Luis Borges, an Argentinian poet, described the Falklands war as "a fight between two bald men over a comb". The Falklands/Malvinas are home to just more than 3,000 people - but at least 150,000 pairs of Magellanic penguins. King, Gentoo, Macaroni and Rockhopper penguins also thrive on the islands' rocky coastlines.

    Following the 1982 war, the issue swiftly fell off the international diplomatic agenda. In fact, British citizens do not need a visa to enter Argentina, while citizens of other western countries - including the US and Canada - need to apply in advance.

    This quiet rapprochement began unravelling in 2007, however, on the 25th anniversary of the war - when Argentina officially reasserted its claim to the islands.

    Economic conflict

    This time, analysts say, Argentina is likely to use its strengthened diplomatic position in an integrated, democratic South America to push its case, along with economic pressure, rather than military force.

    "As to the balance of power, the UK is still more powerful than Argentina," Acosta-Alzuru told Al Jazeera. "What has changed is the political shape of Latin America. This is why President Cristina Kirchner is organising something that resembles an economic blockade of the islands."

    In December 2011, countries from the Mercosur trading block, including Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay, agreed to close their ports to ships flying the Falklands flag. The British foreign office said it was "very concerned" by the move.

    Chile's LAN airlines, which operates the only weekly flight between the islands and the South American mainland, is apparently also coming under pressure to end the route. Argentina has allegedly been threatening to change landing rights for LAN, or perhaps even bar the Falklands/Malvinas flight from its airspace, if the airline doesn’t cancel the route.

    The only other flight to the islands is run by the military, departing twice weekly from London.

    Argentina is calling for the islands to "be transferred back to Argentina", Freedman said. The British didn’t accept that in 1982, and it's doubtful they would agree today, he said - especially not with their pilot prince heading to the island, flanked by battleships.

    The chances of another armed conflict remain seemingly distant, but the deployment of military vehicles into the region, and increasing domestic pressure in both countries, has some observers worried.

    "The UN has tried to mediate before," Freedman said. "At the moment, I don’t know what is going to happen."

    Prince deployed as Falklands dispute warms up - Features - Al Jazeera English

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    OH SHIPPP!!!!!
     

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