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Eurofighter Typhoon

Discussion in 'Europe & Russia' started by 500, Feb 27, 2011.

  1. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    WITH 'F-35 ITALY PUTS YOU IN THE HANDS OF WASHINGTON?
    Posted on Wednesday, February 15 @ 11:22:36 CT by david

    A CONVERSATION WITH GIANANDREA GAIANI

    OF DANIEL SCALEA geopolitical-rivista.org Italy has decided that next year will purchase 90 F-35 fighter instead of 131 as originally scheduled, with a saving of about 5 billion euros. This was announced this morning the Minister of Defense Giampaolo Di Paola in a Senate hearing. (Source: Reuters) While in Italy the debate rages about purchasing F-35 fighter-bombers, in India the contract for 126 multi-role fighter has won by France's Dassault with its Rafale . These events shift the attention to the views of so-called fighters of "fifth generation" and "fourth generation and a half." of the topic we discussed with Gianandrea Gaiani, military analyst, director of " Defence Analysis "and contributor to" Panorama "and "Il Sole 24 Ore".








    "The F-35 is presented as a multirole fighter," says Dr. Gaiani "but in fact above all for its ability to attack, as a fighter." Not surprisingly, Britain and Italy have chosen to combine it with the Eurofighter Typhoon , using it as a defensive fighter. Germany has instead opted for the only Typhoon as multi-role aircraft, both in attack and defense.

    The dr. Gaiani shows advantages and disadvantages of choosing to give priority to German Typhoon : "You do not have the technology of the F-35", which unlike the rival is still under development, but when the plane will enter service in the world's most advanced , "but the cost to be paid is less, and it also provides jobs to the domestic industry." The consortium Eurofighter is in fact made ​​by the German EADS Deutschland , the Spanish EADS CASA and BAE from the UK by Italy's Alenia , the EJ200 engine has been developed by Eurojet consortium, with Britain's Rolls-Royce , MTU of Germany, the Italian Avio and Spain's ITP. Compared to the F-35 European industries, including the Italian, listed only as suppliers or sub-contracting of the U.S., working solely for the production of certain components.

    Despite the Typhoon has been sold in some Arab countries and the Rafale has recently won the Indian contract, Dr. Gaiani not believe that, in ten years, will exist in the West other combat aircraft in production outside the U.S. F-35. "The Rafale was acquired in 200 specimens from France, but had no success in exporting to other part of the recent Indian case. This has benefited from three factors. The first is the French tradition of use of aircraft by Indian aviation. The second is the reduced price that was offered in New Delhi (apparently less than 100 million for example, compared with 120 about the normal price). The third is the "publicity" that has been done by participating in the bombing of Libya. " War in Libya, among other things, it just served as a showcase of promotional fighter Dassault (also operating in Afghanistan), so much so that even the French could now open up the markets of Brazil and Switzerland. In any case, the F-35, while coming in late and being more expensive, will have a couple of significant advantages will be more advanced technologically, and will be purchased throughout the West. In particular, its main technical features are the location of the weapons in the hold instead of under the wings (which will increase the invisibility to radar) and the ability to interface with other platforms, rapidly exchanging images and data with other aircraft and troops to the ground, integrating in a network system according to the dictates of the "war netcentrica".

    Outside of NATO, says Dr. Gaiani, there are other fighters of the last generation of Russians is Suchoj Su-30 and Su-35 and above the PAK FA being developed, and the Chinese J-20. But they have some disadvantages compared to homologous U.S.. The Russians, as capable of designing technologically advanced airplanes, pay the narrowness of their military budget, which does not allow Moscow to by commissioning a number by itself. China, however, is still technologically backward - compared to the jet fighter aircraft - about twenty years. That's why the F-35 could make a difference when it comes into service. But there still remains an unknown factor: Adopt the most advanced technologies require longer development times, and this time it is likely that the anti-aircraft technology (such as radar) make progress in their turn, undermining the expectations aircraft for the attack.

    Without clarity on these points, we return to Italy and to the controversy homegrown acquisition of the F-35. Gaiani Second, the issue should be assessed, even before a military perspective of the business. Obama, who became the president of the USA, has canceled all contracts that the Pentagon had agreed to Italian manufacturers ( Agusta and Finmeccanica ) and the program for the C-27J's Alenia . They were often granted by Washington also committed to rewarding commitment Rome served in Afghanistan and Iraq. According to a logic of reciprocity, Dr. Gaiani believes that Italy would at least ask, in exchange for the confirmation of the North American F-35, the selection of the M-346 Master of Alenia Aermacchi in the upcoming race for the new aircraft from U.S. training. But now there is nothing to suggest that such an agreement was close.

    The alternative to buying the F-35, explains the director of "Defense Analysis," was the adoption of the Typhoon as a strike aircraft, following the example of German. This would mean more jobs in Italy: the consortium Eurofighter is in fact part of Finmeccanica through its subsidiary Alenia . General de Bertolis predicted that the 11,000 workers employed in Italy for the current production of Typhoon , 10,000 will be offset by supplies related to the F-35. "Although he admits that there will be a loss of 1000 jobs, it seems to me that an evaluation optimistic," confessed Dr.. Gaiani, remembering that there are currently only 1500 Italian workers engaged in the F-35.

    To want to force the F-35 were the Italian Air Force and Navy. They want a more modern fighter, which will come into action in the U.S. and Britain, the main allies, with whom he will therefore be easier to integrate. There is a further reason why the Navy wants to have the F-35: "The aircraft carrier Cavour employs the Harrier - explains Dr. Gaiani - that in 10 or 15 years must be replaced, and aircraft at stake, only the variant F-35B has the necessary ability to takeoff and vertical landing. " However, these 20 aircraft, while the total order, even after the recently announced cut to reduce expenses, however, will amount to 90 or 100 F-35. The dr. Gaiani argued in an article the possibility of acquiring in leasing the 20 F-35B required the Navy, in 10 or 15 years.

    In fact, the downside is the possible blow that could be given to our military industry. This should be a strategic assessment to be done upstream. No one has thought to ask dr. Gaiani? "In reality, this evaluation was done of course, since the '90s, all the governments of right and left, then, they have decided and confirmed the purchase of F-35." And the problem goes far beyond our defense industry, as explained by the columnist of "Panorama" and "Sole 24 Ore", "With the F-35 we will be totally in the hands of Washington. Yes we will acquire some technologies, but not the ' hardware . Suppose by contradiction that in twenty years we decide to use of these aircraft, I do not say against the U.S., but against a country or any U.S. ally in your quest unwelcome in Washington. The computer system of the aircraft, its electronic heart, is accessible only to the Americans. " The F-35 will most likely only be used alongside the U.S.. Could be a wrong choice of words if, as is probable Dr. Gaiani, in a few years we may no longer be allies of Washington, because they have been diversifying their national interests in an ever more evident today.

    Just a few days ago, on 8 February, the Italian Supreme Defence Council has reaffirmed the "unavoidable necessity" defense systems to incorporate the European Union. "We talk about European integration - Dr. Bitter said. Gaiani - but then you put in the hands of the U.S.. "


    ComeDonChisciotte - CON L' F-35, L'ITALIA SI METTE NELLE MANI DI WASHINGTON ?
     
  2. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Can Britain Win the Second Falklands War? | The Oxford Student


    Can Britain Win the Second Falklands War?

    By James McKean | Last updated: 13:35, 16/02/2012


    The Royal Navy’s most powerful warship deployed to the Falklands. Prince William dispatched ahead of schedule. Accusations of colonialism, of blockade. As the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War approaches, tensions over the far-flung isles are running menacingly high. Whether or not this feud will escalate to full-blown warfare remains to be seen; dramatic gestures and sabre-rattling are one thing, military action is quite another. Nevertheless, we must accept that there is a potential, however negligible, for armed conflict, and this begs the question; could the British win the Second Falklands War?

    In an interview with The Telegraph, retired professional head of the British Army, General Sir Mike Jackson, claimed it would be “impossible” for the UK to recapture the Falklands, should the Argentines succeed in establishing a foothold and taking Mount Pleasant Airport. Although the Royal Navy has undergone numerous changes since 1982, the main reason for General Jackson’s fear is undoubtedly the loss of the infamous Harrier ‘jump-jet’, which recently fell victim to defence cuts, leaving Britain without a carrier-borne fighter until perhaps as late as 2020.

    It is hard to overestimate the role of the Harrier in the 1982 war, and its loss would certainly be felt keenly. Lord West, retired First Sea Lord, told the Daily Mail “it would be totally impossible for this country, even if it has an Army of ten million, to do anything about (an invasion).” Although it must be remembered that the 1982 victory was felt by many contemporary observers to be an impossible one, it does seem far-fetched that the Navy could launch a successful amphibious assault, not just without air superiority, but without any covering fighters at all. Of course, the new Type 45 air-defence destroyers remain an unknown quantity; could they clear the skies, whilst helicopter and missile elements engage Argentine vessels and ground targets? We can also add into the equation the submarine arm of the Royal Navy. It is widely-believed that a Trafalgar-class nuclear submarine has been deployed to the region in response to the crisis, but of more potency is the new Astute-class hunter-killer; thought to be among the least detectable boats in the world, it has the potential to annihilate the Argentine fleet, as well as tackle land targets with cruise missiles. If David Cameron is prepared to endure General Belgrano-style headlines, he has the means to cause tremendous damage to the Argentinian navy at relatively little risk to his own forces, which might translate into political pressure and force an occupation force to withdraw. Granted, a recovery would be risky and unconventional, but perhaps not as unlikely as Lord West and General Jackson have concluded.

    However, this scenario presupposes a successful Argentine invasion, which UK policy hinges upon being able to prevent. Here, the situation looks favourable. The Eurofighter Typhoon fighters, recently-dispatched HMS Dauntless Type 45 destroyer, and likely submarine presence stand a good chance of being able to shred any Argentine force. Furthermore, it would be a particularly reckless move, even by Hugo Chávez’s standards, for a Mercosur nation to join Argentina in attacking such an entrenched defensive position.

    In conclusion, should war break out, some of the pessimism of senior military figures can reasonably be blunted. Whilst a 1982-style recapture would need rethinking, the Royal Navy remains a force to be reckoned with. Moreover, it is very difficult to see the Argentinians overcoming some of the British military’s most effective units to make a successful landing without undergoing horrendous casualties. President Cristina de Kirchner can gesticulate to her heart’s content; to actually invade would be a catastrophic decision, which is why it will almost certainly not happen at all.

    -James McKean

    [​IMG]
     
  3. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Ausbildungszentrum in Texas: Bundeswehr verabschiedet sich aus Fort Bliss - SPIEGEL ONLINE - Nachrichten - Politik


    16/02/2012
    Training center in Texas
    Bundeswehr adopted from Fort Bliss
    DAPD
    Defense de Maiziere at Fort Bliss (Texas): From a traditional site
    The site has a long tradition: in 1956 the army opened its training center for air defense in the U.S. Fort Bliss. Soon it is closing - the training will be taking place in Husum, exercises are planned in Crete.

    For privacy reasons, your IP address is stored only if you are registered and logged-in Facebook users. If you want to know more about privacy, click on the i
    El Paso / Holloman - The armed forces will refrain in their future reduction in its training center for air defense in the U.S. Fort Bliss. The site has about 270 soldiers will soon be closed, said Defense Minister Thomas de Maiziere on Wednesday evening (local time) during his visit to the troops there. The background is the restructuring of the Air Force, which included a reduction of the current 24 Patriot air defense systems on future only twelve.


    DISPLAYDe Maiziere also made it clear that the formation of the Tornado pilots in the U.S. Air Force base in Holloman (New Mexico) as part of the planned reform and the downsizing of the Air Force will be reduced. But will also consider whether the training of future fighter pilots € could be moved to the United States. The Air Force should have, according to the latest plans in the future target structure by 2025 over 85 Tornado fighter jets and 140 € Fighter.

    The Patriot-training will now be made in Husum in Schleswig-Holstein, "The exercise will focus then shifted to Crete," the Maiziere told Germany radio. He also pledged that the army continues to follow the proven Patriot system firmly believe that to be the German contribution to future NATO Raktenabwehrschild for Europe.

    1956 had army started training their soldiers at Fort Bliss FlaRak in the U.S. state of Texas. First, she was trained at the Nike defense system that was in service until 1986. This was followed by 2003, the Hawk weapon system. Since 1987, the Patriot system, the core ground-based air defense. These missiles can also be used against tactical ballistic missiles and cruise missiles against. Over the past 55 years have good, according to the army passed through more than 50,000 soldiers, these courses.

    hen / DAPD
     
  4. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Portal Fator Brasil

    16/02/2012 - 11:59

    Rolls-Royce engines to reach two milestones for Typhoon fighter aircraft

    [​IMG]

    Rolls-Royce, a global energy systems, has achieved two significant milestones in the program EJ200, the engine used by popular Eurofighter Typhoon fighter aircraft. The first was the recent delivery to the BAE Systems unit of the 300th EJ200 engine, built on the premises of Rolls-Royce in Bristol, UK.

    The second great achievement was the 500th motor unit Tranche 2, produced by Rolls-Royce on behalf of the consortium Eurojet. Both equip Typhoon aircraft type, belonging to the Royal Saudi Air Force (RSAF).

    Nick Durham, president of the Defense Business Rolls-Royce celebrated the numbers of success. "These deliveries illustrate the progress of EJ200 program and highlight the benefits that our customers realize in our technology."

    Rolls-Royce engines and test rides on behalf of the Eurojet EJ200, who is an important partner in service to the air forces of the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia. Currently, the equipment is in service with air forces of countries like UK, Germany, Italy, Spain, Austria and Saudi Arabia.

    The EJ200 has demonstrated excellent performance and reliability to equip the Typhoon during Operation Ellamy, led by the United Kingdom in Libya in 2011 . More than 6,000 flight hours in combat missions with no rejections were recorded during the deployment engine.

    In 2010, Rolls-Royce signed an innovative service contract worth £ 865 million with the Ministry of Defence to provide the RAF, Royal Air Force in the country, a guaranteed level of availability for its EJ200 engines by 2018.

    Profile - Rolls-Royce is a leading global provider of power systems and services for use on land, sea and air and established a strong position in global markets - civil aerospace, defense aerospace, marine and energy.

    As a result of this strategy, the company today has a broad customer base that includes more than 500 airlines, 4,000 corporate and utility aircraft and helicopter operators, 160 armed forces, more than 4,000 marine customers including 70 navies, and customers energy in approximately 120 countries.

    Annual revenue was £ 11.3 billion in 2011, more than half of which comes from the provision of services. The firm order backlog reached and announced £ 62.2 billion on December 31, 2011, resulting in good prospects for future activity levels.

    Rolls-Royce employs over 40,400 employees trained in offices, manufacturing and services in over 50 countries, including Brazil. Of these, over 11,000 are engineers.

    In 2011, Rolls-Royce invested £ 908 million on research and development, two thirds of this total are aimed at further improving the environmental aspects of its products, in particular the reduction of emissions.

    Rolls-Royce supports a global network of 28 University Technology Centres, which connect the company's engineers at the forefront of scientific research.

    The Group has a strong commitment to the recruitment of apprentices and graduates and to develop the skills of their employees.

    Air Pacific and its subsidiary, Pacific Sun, held together more than 400 flights per week. The company operates Boeing 747 and Boeing 737, between Fiji and other 15 cities located in 10 different countries. The destinations include Hong Kong, United States, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, Kiribati, Vanuatu and Solomon Islands. Air Pacific aircraft carrying 68% of all visitors flying to Fiji. The company employs over 790 employees, record annual profits of F $ 600 million and directly contributes to a significant share of GDP. The Pacific Sun operates a combination of ATR 42-500 aircraft and aircraft De Havilland Twin Otter in ten domestic routes and regional flights from Fiji to Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu. [Www.Rolls-Royce.com].
     
  5. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Defence: BAE tracks modest profit growth 2012

    2012-02-16 11: 51

    (SIX) BAE Systems CEO Ian King believes in good international business this year.

    In a commentary in the company's interim report writes King: "our order backlog can be a bit knölig ... but we expect good international business of the year", reports Dow Jones Newswires.
    According to King, BAE WILL benefit from increased military spending in Saudi Arabia which is the company's largest market outside the United States and the United Kingdom. King is also convinced that secured an order for fighter Typhoon from Oman on behalf of the Eurofighter consortium.
    The Eurofighter is still a player when it comes to the Indian order of fighters, he said, although India has chosen Dassault Aviation for the exclusive final call.
    "This is just one step in the process. It is still not the final agreement, "he said.
    BAE Systems has, as well as several other defense companies, has become increasingly dependent on international business due to the fact that United States and United Kingdom reduced its defence expenditure.
    BAE Systems ' net profit rose by 18 percent in 2011, while the order book blinked to 36.2 billion British pounds, from 39.5 billion.
    The Group tracks a modest profit growth in 2012, excluding the effect of a tax credit which contributed to an increase of 18 percent in net profit in 2011.
    Sales growth is predicted to be stable.

    di.se
     
  6. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    AFP: BAE holds out hope for mega-contract with India

    BAE holds out hope for mega-contract with India

    By Philippe Valat (AFP) – 3 hours ago

    LONDON — British arms manufacturer BAE Systems said Thursday it held out hope that India may reverse its decision to negotiate a mega-contract for 126 fighter jets exclusively with France's Dassault Aviation.

    In a lacklustre earnings statement, BAE said it still felt a deal with India could bounce its way despite a shock decision from the former colony long seen as a privileged partner for Britain.

    India announced in late January it had selected Dassault, builder of the Rafale, over BAE as the preferred bidder in a contract estimated to be worth $12 billion (9.1 billion euros).

    The Eurofighter Typhoon project, which had been seen as the frontrunner, involves Britain's BAE and companies in Germany, Italy and Spain.

    If concluded, the contract would mark the first time the French jet had found an export partner, despite being in service with the French military since 1998 and having proved itself in several conflicts.

    France is confident that it can sign and seal a firm deal to supply India the jets within six to nine months.

    But BAE, who owns 33 percent of the Eurofighter project, said it would keep fighting for the India deal.

    "The programme has a long way to go before a contract is awarded and we continue to actively support the bid," BAE said in its earnings statement.

    BAE chief executive Ian King added that the consortium partners were exploring all options including a discount on the aircraft, though he added there were limits on how far the consortium would go.

    Howard Wheeldon, independent defence and aerospace analyst, predicted "a long running contest".

    "Eurofighter Typhoon has still got a very credible chance of pulling this back," he said.

    The main question "is whether France and Rafale can meet the commitments that they have made of in terms of industrialisation and technology transfer commitments to India," Wheeldon said.

    Britain and Eurofighter already have a lot of experience in this domain, Wheeldon noted and could use this to wrench India away from the Rafale.

    In the days following the announcement, French President Nicolas Sarkozy underlined the significant transfers of technology in the deal.

    The big stakes deal with India may cloud a Franco-British summit in Paris on Friday. Tensions between France and Britain have been high lately, mainly on European issues.

    The pressure is on BAE to expand its market with old customers Britain and the United States slashing defence spending.

    BAE sales in 2011 sank 14 percent as cash-strapped governments axed spending on defence and security, and the company's order book shrank to £36.2 billion.

    Earnings rose 18 percent last year but only thanks to one-off items such as a research-and-development tax credit and through axeing 22,000 jobs out of a global workforce of 100,000 staff.

    Looking beyond the setback in India, BAE said successful conclusion of negotiations for a crucial Saudi Arabian fighter jet contract would underpin earnings growth this year.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I like how they keep going on about it, though if they really cared about the typhoon they would have supported it rather than discarded it for the F-35. Though an e-mail might just make things change.
     
  7. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Finmeccanica Beats Korean Offer to Supply Aircraft to Israel

    February 16, 2012, 12:08 PM EST


    By Marco Bertacche and Calev Ben-David

    (Updates with shares in fifth paragraph.)

    Feb. 16 (Bloomberg) -- Finmeccanica SpA won an order valued at an estimated $1 billion from the Israeli air force for combat training jets, beating an offer from South Korea.

    Israel plans to buy 30 M346 aircraft from the Alenia Aermacchi unit of Rome-based Finmeccanica, the Ministry of Defense said today in an e-mailed statement. In return, the Italian government agreed to make purchases from Israeli defense industries for a matching $1 billion.

    Finmeccanica was selected over Korea Aerospace Industries Co. in part because of the so-called offset deal, the government said. The air force also “expressed professional preference for the Italian training jets.” The deal must be approved by the defense minister and the Knesset, Israel’s parliament.

    Korea Aerospace, the country’s largest planemaker, was offering its T-50 Golden Eagle jet. The manufacturer signed its first export deal for the aircraft in May, selling 16 planes to Indonesia. In that deal, South Korea agreed to transfer technology to Indonesia.

    Finmeccanica rose 2.4 percent, the sharpest gain in two weeks, to close at 3.49 euros in Milan trading, outperforming Italy’s benchmark FTSEMIB index, which declined 0.9 percent.

    Finmeccanica, which is controlled by the Italian state, has been increasing sales in fast-growing markets to rely less on the defense budgets of its main buyers, Italy and the U.K. The Italian company is a partner in the Eurofighter Typhoon warplane and has a turboprop venture with European Aeronautic, Defense & Space Co.

    Italian Defense Minister Giampaolo Di Paola said yesterday that the country will reduce its planned order for Lockheed Martin Corp.’s F-35 fighter jets, built in partnership with suppliers including Alenia. The Finmeccanica unit got a 170 million-euro ($223 million) contract in June from Singapore for services related to M346 jets.

    --With assistance from Andrew Davis in Rome. Editors: David Risser, Tom Lavell

    To contact the reporters on this story: Marco Bertacche in Milan at mbertacche@bloomberg.net; Calev Ben-David in Jerusalem at cbendavid@bloomberg.net

    To contact the editors responsible for this story: Gwen Ackerman at gackerman@bloomberg.net; Jerrold Colten at jcolten@bloomberg.net


    Finmeccanica Beats Korean Offer to Supply Aircraft to Israel - Businessweek
     
  8. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    MoD balances books first time in four decades, Defence Secretary to announce - Telegraph

    MoD balances books first time in four decades, Defence Secretary to announce

    The Ministry of Defence has finally balanced its books for the first time in four decades, the Defence Secretary is to announce.

    [​IMG]

    The Eurofighter Typhoon will now receive funding to allow it to carry a full array of armaments including the Stormshadow and Brimstone missiles Photo: PA

    By Thomas Harding, Defence Correspondent

    7:00AM GMT 17 Feb 2012

    The notorious £38 billion “black hole” in MoD finances has been “dealt with” and the department's “hand to mouth existence will come to an end,” Philip Hammond will say.

    Ministers have even found a "spare" £2.1 billion which has been earmarked for several major spending projects to be announced in the coming weeks.

    The money has come from a combination of draconian cuts over the last two years, tough bargaining with industry and a one per cent increase in the equipment budget.

    All three Services will benefit from the new-found cash that will be announced in the next wave of spending proposals - known as Planning Round 12 - by early next month.

    “New equipment and support contracts amounting to billions of pounds are likely to be unveiled,” said a senior MoD official. “PR12 is expected to signal a change in culture at the MoD.

    “We have said to people that we expect this year to balance the budget and resolve the black hole and we can do that now without cutting anything any further.”

    The Navy’s ability to conduct substantial on amphibious operations will be restored with the MoD paying to convert all 22 of the RAF’s Merlin troop transport helicopters for sea movements. The Fleet will also receive funding to start building its fleet of advanced Type 26 frigates.

    At least £200 million will be made available to upgrade the fleet of Puma helicopters that are likely to play a role in ferrying special forces around the Olympics.

    The Eurofighter Typhoon, that had limited success over Libya, will now receive funding to allow it to carry a full array of armaments including the Stormshadow and Brimstone missiles.

    The move might give the Eurofighter consortium an outside chance of clawing back the £7 billion contract for new fighters that India awarded to the more developed French-built Rafale fighter.

    Liam Fox, the former Defence Secretary, was instrumental in implementing the drastic savings that included greater accountability by the defence industry with the Major Projects Review Board which threatened to “name and shame” companies that were late and over budget.

    Since Dr Fox’s departure a forensic eye has been applied to MoD accounting with the arrival of Mr Hammond nicknamed the “Phil the Spreadsheet King”.

    The appointment of Bernard Gray, who wrote a highly critical report on defence procurement, as head of Defence Equipment and Support has led to a much tighter grip on industry contracts.

    The MoD has also slashed allowances and will make further savings by removing troops from Germany.

    But questions have been raised that the scale of the cuts has damaged Britain’s world standing as a defence power.

    The loss of aircraft carriers, Harrier jets, Nimrod surveillance aircraft and 30,000 personnel have severely weakened the Forces.

    Defence experts have also questioned where the extra money has come from and whether the MoD pushed certain projects into the 2013 financial year to balance the books.

    Francis Tusa, editor of Defence Analysis, said: “Let them publish the financial figures. If they won’t then it is right and proper for everyone to doubt they have got their budget right.”

    He warned that there was still a danger of officials disrupting the budget in the future by putting in “unaffordable programmes”.

    A Treasury source said Danny Alexander, Chief Secretary to the Treasury, and Mr Hammond had worked “closely together on good spending control and tight financial planning”.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WWWWWWAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

    Well its a about fckig time
     
  9. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    That is so AWSOMMMMMMMM

    Guy with the eye patch must be baldys co employee
     
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  10. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Allen Cook CBE | People | Recruiter

    Allen Cook CBE

    February 2012 | By DeeDee Doke

    Deedee Doke spoke with the AM&E industry leader

    [​IMG]

    After nearly 40 years in advanced manufacturing and engineering (AM&E), Allan Cook CBE has no career regrets. He’s worked for many of the biggest names in automotive, aerospace and defence industries on household name programmes such as Eurofighter. Now he is chairman of engineering and design consultancy WS Atkins and defence electronics company SELEX Galileo, among other high-profile corporate governance roles. And he’s a proud, passionate engineer.

    “I wouldn’t change my career for anything,” Cook says. “If somebody turned around and said to me, ‘Start all over again’, I can’t see me doing anything differently. I might do it better, and I might do it faster, but I wouldn’t do anything differently.”

    You might ask: aside from serving as a peerless advocate for engineering careers, what does a top engineer/senior executive have to do with recruitment and talent issues? In Cook’s case, plenty. Throughout his high-flying engineering career, Cook has seen firsthand the difference that top calibre talent makes to the sector — and what happens when a downturn forces significant talent out of a business.

    So a major priority for him now as chairman of the Sector Skills Council for Science, Engineering & Manufacturing (Semta) and the Skills and Jobs Retention Group is ensuring that AM&E interests in the UK retain their talent, as he tells Recruiter during a meeting in Atkins’s offices in London.

    No discussion about the UK engineering sector today is complete without a reference to its dwindling pools of AM&E skills. Paradoxically, at the same time that major engineering employers such as BAE Systems, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) and the services have announced cutbacks in their workforces, other employers in the field have significant jobs to fill.

    Following the autumn 2010 release of the Strategic Defence and Security Review, which outlined potential cutbacks of thousands of MoD and services personnel, as well as cuts to defence programmes, Secretary of State for Business Innovation & Skills (BIS) Vince Cable tapped Cook to lead an initiative and a working group to prevent erosion of the UK’s existing engineering skills and talent base. Concern was high that “the skills that had been so carefully nurtured over many, many years would actually be lost in this reduction due to market forces and fiscal constraints on spending, particularly in the defence area”, Cook explains.

    In July 2011, on the back of a £450k investment by the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES), came the launch of the Talent Retention Solution (TRS). TRS is a web-based service that supports redeployment and recruitment across AM&E industries including aerospace, automotive, civil engineering, defence, energy, marine, manufacturing, nuclear, power generation and renewables. The website holds details of engineering staff at risk of redundancy, and engineering vacancies at other organisations.

    A national service, TRS’s origins stemmed from a free online recruitment portal that had been created by the Farnborough Aerospace Consortium and Winchester Consulting for aerospace and defence businesses in the South-East. Winchester also built TRS.

    As of last month, TRS is self-funded, through its major employer sponsors (see Key Facts, p28) and any participating company with 500 or more employees. Cook won’t say how much the major employers contribute to the service, allowing only: “It’s a very cost-effective solution. The fees you’re talking about, the recruitment for two or three engineers would cover the cost of the fee they would pay, and companies will willingly pay that sort of amount to become part of the scheme. Why wouldn’t they?”

    Starting the momentum

    In late January, 352 companies had registered to use the system, which also had 719 registered candidates and 526 live vacancies. The number of employer subscriptions was about a third of the way to the 1,000 that the UKCES site reports was targeted for this point in time. “Have we made enough progress? No,” he says. “Are we continuing to make progress? Absolutely. The momentum is picking up.”

    While professing to be “delighted with the progress we’ve made”, Cook says he would like to see TRS achieve greater profile in the marketplace, particularly among small-and-medium sized enterprises (SMEs), those with fewer than 500 workers and for whom the service is free. Of the UK’s estimated 70,000 AM&E companies, Cook says “probably at least 50,000 of those employ 10 people or less”. Clearly, SMEs stand to benefit significantly through the no-cost involvement on offer and the reduced recruitment costs they can realise through the system.

    “So anything we can do to encourage companies to register, to put their requirements on the database, to put people who are put at risk on the database will be a benefit for lots of organisations,” he says.

    “Everybody wins,” he emphasises. “It’s one of these true success stories. It’s employer-driven — it has been designed, developed and implemented by industry. It’s a novel, innovative, successful approach.”

    There are no figures yet available to gauge how many engineers have been redeployed through TRS. “Can we tell you the exact number? No, we can’t,” Cook acknowledges. “As the system gets more mature, then we will be able to do that because we will have built up a database that will tell us how many have actually been deployed in those areas.”

    It is suggested to Cook that because technology develops today at lightning speed, the skills of engineers who are made redundant may be less valuable to businesses that seek to recruit for the ‘next generation’ engineering project. He vigorously rejects that notion. In industries such as aerospace and defence, he says, “there’s a long gestation period. The product cycles are long and extended. To develop a new aircraft, military or commercial, you’re talking about a five to 10-year cycle. To develop a new engine, you’re talking about a five, six or seven-year cycle”.

    “So,” he continues, “the skills that are needed… are actually systems engineering, software development and also, basically, technician expertise. So those skill sets are still required. Technology moves on, absolutely. But the basics are very similar.”

    Cook believes that up to “25 to 30%” of the talent to eventually be registered on TRS will be made up of MoD and services personnel who will lose their jobs some time in 2013. Already, however, TRS member companies, such as BAE Systems and Rolls Royce, have made arrangements to, respectively, work through TRS to match workers who stand to lose their jobs at one firm with available vacancies at the other.

    This is what the programme is all about. “I know just how painful it is — one, to recruit the right calibre of talent that you need to survive and grow your business, and secondly… it is extremely painful to see people that you’ve nurtured, grown and developed being put at risk,” Cook says.

    Key performance indicators aside, Cook says that the ultimate measurement of TRS’s success will be “client satisfaction”, when client companies can say that without the system, they would not be as successful as they are. “That’s the key to success,” he says.


    Secret of Success

    Hard work, long hours, great opportunities and great people. You only get out of this what you’re prepared to put into it, and if you’re prepared to put into it everything that you’ve got and more, I think you get the benefit

    CV

    Currently: chairman of the Skills and Retention Group, the UK Trade & Investment’s Advanced Engineering Sector Advisory Board, Sector Skills Council for SEMTA

    Also: chairman of WS Atkins and SELEX Galileo, deputy chairman of Marshall of Cambridge (Holdings), a member of the operating executive board of JF Lehman & Co

    Previously: CEO, Cobham; senior roles at GEC-Marconi, BAE Systems, Hughes Aircraft

    2008 Awarded a CBE in the Queen’s New Year’s Honours list


    KEY FACTS

    Talent Retention Solution sponsors are: BAE Systems, Rolls-Royce, Nissan, Siemens, EDF, Airbus

    UK Commission for Employment and Skills investment: £450,000

    Employer in-kind investment: £431,200

    Registration is free to companies with less than 500 employees.

    Secretary of State for BIS, Vince Cable, says: “The TRS provides a way for advanced manufacturing and engineering companies to recruit engineers quickly.” www.talentretention.biz
     
  11. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    Nice Pic :happy:
     
  12. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Cheers. That could be used soon against the argentine airforce! :devil:
     
  13. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    BBC News - BAE Eurofighter: Warton and Salmesbury 'no direct job losses'

    BAE Eurofighter: Warton and Salmesbury 'no direct job losses'

    A Lancashire MP says he has been told no jobs will be lost at BAE Systems factories there if the company loses a $10bn (£6.3bn) contract to supply Eurofighter jets to India.

    Mark Menzies, Conservative MP for Fylde, said he "had assurances by BAE" there would be no "direct job losses".

    BAE Systems had planned to partly assemble 126 Typhoon jets for India at plants in Warton and Samlesbury.

    But India's government said it planned to buy cheaper French Rafale jets.

    Jobs under threat

    Both BAE Systems and French company Dassault had bid for the contract to supply the Indian Air Force.

    Mr Menzies is among a group of MPs meeting David Cameron later to "reiterate the importance" the Eurofighter has to the region.

    He said: "We want to drive home to him that everything must be done even at this late stage to secure this order.

    "The deal is very important, not just for the export potential of this aircraft, but also for the jobs and the skills we have in the North West."

    The Eurofighter Typhoon is built by the German and Spanish branches of European aerospace giant EADS, Britain's BAE Systems and Italy's Finmeccanica.

    BAE Systems announced plans to cut 1,400 jobs in Lancashire and up to 900 at Brough in East Yorkshire in September.

    In January the firm said more than half the 1,400 jobs under threat at BAE Systems in Lancashire had been cut without compulsory redundancies.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Looks like we dont need India after all to save the jobs. Looks like another govt plan.
     
  14. Nirvana

    Nirvana Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    You are expecting Britain-Argentine showdown ??
     
  15. G777

    G777 Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    I have a feeling that between Argentine and Britain the thread is thin enough to break:

    Fight the Falklands furore

    Jack Harris argues that Britain needs to play the grown up in the ongoing Falklands saga

    Jack Harris on Friday 24th February 2012

    Weird as it may seem in the midst of an economic crisis and sweeping changes across the Middle East, the Falkland Islands are back in the headlines. And yes, Argentina still cares about them, quite a lot, in fact. Its government has been tightening the screws on the hapless islanders for a few years now, but the rhetorical onslaught of the past few weeks has been astonishing.

    Cristina Kirchner called the place the 'last refuge of a declining empire'. Really? Britain is clinging on to imperial splendour with a few villages in the southern Atlantic? I doubt anyone in the UK outside of a few dark, dusty corners of the civil service could even find the place on a map before Argentina invaded it. The subject barely makes it onto British curriculums, and is not expounded as a point of national honour worth fighting for. Unlike, dare I say it, in Argentina.

    I dislike patriotic ranting in general, but find myself veering uncomfortably close to right-wing diatribe whenever the Falklands issue flares up. It's hard to relate to the Argentine side of the argument, which places such an insane amount of weight on a such a profoundly meaningless dispute, driven mainly, I suspect, by an inability to face the fact that six hundred Argentines died in a pointless conflict.

    It's not just rhetoric, though; Argentina has been putting the screws on the islands over the past two years. First flights to Argentina were cut off, and now the one direct flight to the mainland, to Chile, which provides the islanders with most of their supplies, is coming under pressure. Then, a move across Latin America to ban ships flying the Falklands flag from entering port. But things really got serious when Argentina ordered its trawlers to aggressively fish the squid stocks on which the Falklands' economy apparently depends.

    Seriously? Restoring national honour by waging a proxy war on squid? That said, the UK has hardly taken the moral high ground; the government deployed Prince William to the islands, which aside from being perhaps the oddest manifestation of the 'warrior royal' shtick that has sprung up since we started routinely bombing other countries again, manages to look aggressive and quaintly pathetic in one stroke. It managed to conjure up the old spectre of imperialist Britain and the haughty princes that once ran it, while simultaneously reminding the rest of the world that instead of valiant aristocrats we now have a helicopter pilot kept in the public eye only by tabloid obsession.

    This is shaping up to be the most absurd international conflict Britain has got itself involved in since the Cod Wars. (Look them up. They really happened.) Conflict is perhaps the wrong word, as both sides know full well that there is little chance of an actual war breaking out; indeed, the whole tiresome exchange of of diplomatic potshots might have been avoided if the Conservative party had simply ignored it.

    That said, Britain may have a chance to lessen tensions somewhat. Argentina has fired up its patriotic engines once again in part because the 30th anniversary of the conflict is not far off, but equally because of Britain's decision to start drilling for potentially substantial oil deposits near the islands.

    Using the Falklands to get a legal foothold on natural resources thousands of miles away from the UK is little absurd. Though technically they may fall within the required distance from the islands coastline, any serious British claim to them is both tenuous and arrogant. In any case, the original (at least public) rationale for defending the islands is their right to choose who rules them, rather than a boost to BP's share price.

    The UK should offer Argentina rights to oil, gas and whatever other valuable fuels they can dredge up out of the depths in return for acknowledgement of the general principle that people have the right to pick their own government. We have no legitimate claim to the resources, and any argument that the islanders themselves need control of deep-sea fossil fuels would be strained at best. Argentina might ignore the suggestion, or get even angrier, but it would at least blunt the accusations of British resource colonialism that have left even America hesitant to oppose Argentina's claim to the islands.

    We're too often blind to how politically effective even the vaguest tirades against British colonialism still are outside of the UK. In the Falklands, there is an opportunity to blunt those accusations, to be diplomatic, reasonable, and with fewer awkward cameos by princes. It should not be missed.

    Cherwell.org | No, Minister | Fight the Falklands furore by Jack Harris

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Now when I see articles say there will not be a war and then I see articles of attack subs on standby and new ships being sent down to the falklands.

    The Argies want the Oil, but will we let them have it, they also want the islands back, we are definetly not giving that back, they also want non militarization, thats not going to happen because we are doing that right now to protect the rigs...

    Who wouldnt want this:

    Falklands oilfields could yield $176bn tax windfall - Telegraph

    As I see it, there is another hint of possible conflict, we have far less numbers down there than the whole of the argentine forces.

    Its been a while but I still believe the thread is thin. So do others.
     

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