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Explaining the Baha'i Faith: One of the religions that accepts Hindu faith partialy

Discussion in 'The Big Adda' started by InfoWarrior, Jul 30, 2017.

  1. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    The Lotus Temple, a Bahá'í House of Worship in New Delhi, India. It attracts an average of 4 million visitors a year. A 2001 CNN report referred to it as the most visited building in the world.

    The majority of Bahá'ís live in Asia (3.6 million), Africa (1.8 million), and Latin America (900,000). According to some estimates, the largest Bahá'í community in the world is in India, with 2.2 million Bahá'ís, next is Iran, with 350,000, the US, with 150,000, and Brazil, with 60,000. Aside from these countries, numbers vary greatly. Currently, no country has a Bahá'í majority.

    Hinduism is recognized in the Bahá'í Faith as one of nine known religions and its scriptures are regarded as predicting the coming of Bahá'u'lláh (Kalki avatar). Krishna is included in the succession of Manifestations of God. The authenticity of the Hindu scriptures is seen as uncertain.

    Bahá'u'lláh (founder of Bahai faith ) was familiar with Hinduism, which is clear from a tablet to Mírzá Abu'l-Fadl, the English translation of which is included in the volume Tabernacle of Unity. In this tablet Bahá'u'lláh answered questions about Hinduism and Zoroastrianism by Maneckji Limji Hataria. The subjects include comparative religion, and constitute, while much remains implicit, a dialogue of Bahá'u'lláh with Hinduism and the other religions discussed, giving an understanding of what Baha'u'llah meant with the unity of the world religions.[2]

    In another tablet (published in Gleanings, section LXXXVII) Bahá'u'lláh discussed the absence of records about history before Adam. Here he refers to the Jug-Basisht (Book of Juk), which is the Persian translation of the Yoga Vasistha, a syncretic philosophic text.[2] The translation was done during the Mughal Dynasty in the sixteenth century A.D. and became popular in Persia among intellectuals with Indo-Persian interests since then.[3] In the Story of Bhusunda, a chapter of the Yoga Vasistha, a very old sage, Bhusunda, recalls a succession of epochs in the earth's history, as described in Hindu cosmology. Juan Cole states that this means that in dating Creation, Bahá'u'lláh promotes the theory of a long chronology over a short one.[2]

    Brahman (God)

    In Hinduism Brahman is believed to be the Absolute Reality. Followers of Vedanta see Brahman as an impersonal reality, of which each soul (ātman) is a part. The theistic traditions of Hinduism, which include Vaishnavism and Shaivism, consider Brahman as a personal God, whom they call Bhagwan or Ishvara (Lord).[4] According to the Bahá'í teachings these differing views are all valid, as they represent different points of view looking at the Absolute Reality.

    Avatars (Manifestations of God)
    Both Hinduism and the Bahá'í Faith teach that God manifests himself at different times and places. These messengers are termed Avatars in Hinduism and Manifestations of God in the Bahá'í teachings.[6] However the difference is that Hinduism teaches that Avatars are God himself in human form and are thus divine while Bahá'í teachings stress that the Manifestations of God are not God but his representatives.

    The Manifestations of God are not seen as incarnations of God as God cannot be divided and does not descend to the condition of his creatures, but they are also not seen as ordinary mortals. Instead, the Bahá'í concept of a Manifestation of God emphasizes the simultaneously existing qualities of humanity and divinity. In the station of divinity, they show forth the will, knowledge and attributes of God; in the station of humanity, they show the physical qualities of common man.[7] A common Bahá'í analogy used to explain the relationship between the Manifestation of God and God is that of a perfect mirror. In the analogy, God is likened to the Sun – the source of physical life on earth. The spirit and attributes of God are likened to the rays of the Sun, and the Manifestations of God are likened to perfect mirrors reflecting the rays of the Sun.[8] Thus, the Manifestations of God act as pure mirrors that reflect the attributes of God onto this material world.[7]

    Deities and images
    In Hinduism many deities, depicted in images and murti (statues), are worshipped. Many Hindus realize that all these deities represent different aspects of the one God, Brahman. The Bahá'í teachings state that in this day, when mankind is reaching the state of maturity, images are not needed anymore to form an idea of God.[9]

    Ethical and moral teachings
    There are many similarities in the ethical and moral teachings of Hinduism and the Bahá'í Faith. These include subject as contemplation, detachment, faith, love, non-violence, purity, respect for parents, righteousness, self-control, right speech, not stealing, truth, virtue, work as worship.[

    Adaptation of Bahá'í teachings to Hindu context
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    Bahá'í House of Worship, New Delhi, India.
    The speedy growth of the Indian Bahá'í community since the 1960s was influenced by adapting the Bahá'í teachings for presentation in a clearly Hindu context familiar to the people of the countryside - using principles and language familiar to them:[1][11]

    • the presentation of Bahá'u'lláh as the Kalki Avatar who according to the Vishnu Purana will appear at the end of the Kali Yuga for the purpose of reestablishing an era of righteousness;
    • emphasizing the figures of Buddha and Krishna as past Manifestations of God or Avatars;
    • references to Hindu scriptures such as the Bhagavad Gita;
    • the substitution of Sanskrit-based terminology for Arabic and Persian where possible (i.e., Bhagavan Baha for Bahá'u'lláh), and the incorporation in both song (bhajan)[12] and literature of Hindu holy places, hero-figures and poetic images;
    • Hindi translations of Baha'i scriptures and prayers that appeared during this period which are so heavily Sanskritized as to make it difficult to recognize their non-Hindu antecedents.

    Gandhi and Tagore
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    Mahatma Gandhi and Rabindranath Tagore, 1940.
    Mahatma Gandhi and writer Rabindranath Tagore, both Hindus, had contact with Bahá'ís on several occasions.[13][14] In his book Mahatma Gandhi and the Bahá'ís, M.V. Gandhimohan analyzes similarities and differences between Gandhi's thought and the Bahá'í teachings.[13] Gandhi called the Bahá'í Faith "a solace to humankind".[13]

    Tagore met 'Abdu'l-Bahá in Chicago, United States, in 1912, a few months before his Nobel-prize winning collection of poetry Gitanjali was first published in English. 'Abdu'l-Bahá later wrote about Tagore that "he is one of the promoters of peace and reconciliation. He is kind to all people".[14] Tagore, who was also the secretary of the Hindu reform movement Adi Brahmo Samaj, stated that "the ideals of my university (Visva-Bharati) Santiniketan, Bengal, India, are quite akin to the universal ideals of Bahá’u’lláh. Visva-Bharati cherishes the ideal of an active co-operation between the different religions and cultures of the East and the West, and nothing would please me more than to offer a permanent place at my university to the culture and research of the great religion founded by the Prophet Bahá’u’lláh.".[14] On another occasion he stated that Bahá’u’lláh "is the latest Prophet to come out of Asia. His life is certainly a glorious record of unflinching human search after truth; and his message is of great importance for the progress of civilization."
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bahá'í_Faith_and_Hinduism
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2017
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  2. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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  3. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    The world center of this religion is in Israel....
     
  4. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    This Lotus temple is built on a piece of land which my family donated to GOI in 1951 for resettling the Hindu refugees from west Pakistan. This total land is part of an old village of Delhi which was situated right opposite, Kalkaji Temple called Moja Bahapur. It was a Brahmin Village and happens to be my ancestral village before we shifted to the present village as the river Yamuna altered course and moved further away from our Village. The stamp duty for the change of title of this land was paid for by Central Govt as it was a gift to them by my Late Grandfather. The total land parcel is 20bigha, 16 biswa. Anyone who knows this area will know that present location of Holy Family Hospital is where the normal course of River Yamuna was till about 1949.
    Khangrass govt gifted this land to bahai's for making this temple.
     
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  5. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Very interesting.
    The purpose of this thread was purely educational. As world is becoming more atheistic and liberal. People will get more interested in their root religions.

    Proto-Indo-European religion is the belief system adhered to by the Proto-Indo-Europeans. Although this belief system is not directly attested, it has been reconstructed by scholars of comparative mythology based on the similarities in the belief systems of various Indo-European peoples.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proto-Indo-European_religion
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    Detail from the Gundestrup cauldron from Gundestrup, Denmark, thought to date between 150 BC and 1 AD, showing the Celtic god Cernunnos with horns, sitting in a meditative position, surrounded by animals.

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    The Pashupati seal from Mohenjo-daro in northern India, dated to between 2350 and 2000 BC, showing a horned, tricephelic deity in a meditative position, surrounded by animals
     
  6. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Japanese are returning to their ancestral religions.
    Back to the future: Shinto’s growing influence in politics
    A small organization, little known to the public, has helped restore much of Japan’s controversial past — and it is only getting started

    Immaculate and ramrod straight in a crisp, black suit, Japan’s education minister, Hakubun Shimomura, speaks like a schoolteacher — slowly and deliberately. His brow creases with concern when he talks about Japan’s diminished place in the world, its years of anemic economic growth and poorly competing universities. Mostly, though, he appears to be worried about the moral and spiritual decline of the nation’s youth.

    “The biggest problem with Japanese education is the tremendous self-deprecation of our high school children,” he says in an interview at his Tokyo office. He cites an international survey in which children are asked: “Are there times when you feel worthless?” Eighty-four percent of Japanese kids say yes — double the figure in the United States, South Korea and China, he laments. “Without changing that, Japan has no future.”


    Shimomura’s remedy for this corrosive moral decay is far-reaching: Children will be taught moral and patriotic education and respect for Japan’s national symbols, its “unique” culture and history. Textbooks will remove “self-deprecating” views of history and references to “disputed” war crimes. They will reflect the government’s point of view on key national issues, such as Japan’s bitter territorial disputes with its three closest neighbors: China, Russia and South Korea.

    Education reform represents only one layer of Shimomura and his government’s ambitions. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, a close political ally, wants to revise three of the country’s basic modern charters: the 1946 Constitution, the education law, which they both think undervalues patriotism, and the nation’s security treaty with the United States. The Emperor would be returned to a more prominent place in Japanese society. The special status of Yasukuni Shrine, which enshrines most of Japan’s war dead, including the men who led the nation to disaster between 1933 and 1945, would be restored.
    http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/20...s-growing-influence-in-politics/#.WX4I-XlLfIU
     
  7. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    You got me wrong completely. The village was called Bahapur not because of bahapuri faith but becoz Yamuna used to take away everything in its spate-baha lay jaati thee so Bahapur. This village even today has "Draupadi kund" where Pandavas used to bath to offer their prayers to Lord Shiva. They had built it as their camping ground when Indraprastha was being built. The Pandavas built temple of "Shambhu Dayal" is still their but it has gone one story below the ground due to earth's movements. It was in this village that my forefathers told Holkars that Raja Surajmal and his forces have already reached Ballabhgarh and chasing them is futile. This happened just a day before the third battle od Panipat. The rivalry between Shinde's of Gwalior and Holkars resulted in Humiliation of our jaat Raja SurajMal and we left Maratha camp. Holkars tried to attack the Jaat forces and my family was part of Jaat forces as one of their very powerful subedaars. We fooled Holkars in our Village.
    Only army which cud defeat marathas before third battle of Panipat was that of Jaats from Bharatpur. In battle of Kumher, Marathas fought us for six months and went back defeated in 1754. The Maratha army was commanded by Holkars, the cheats of India because of whom we lost the third battle of Panipat which had been won by 3pm on that day, for their cowardice
     
  8. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Third battle of Panipat was lost because of disunity among Hindus, Both Jaats and Marathas were responsible. When there is no mechanism to reduce hatred between different sections of Hindus, naturally third people will take advantage...
    Anyway Mahadji Scindia took revenge against Rohaila Pathans for panipat...

















     

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