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Explosion in Mumbai!!

Discussion in 'National Politics' started by RoYaN, Jul 13, 2011.

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  1. chachachoudhary

    chachachoudhary Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    For the beginning, even if we can do the following things. It will go a long way in our fight against terrorism.

    1)--Special fast track courts having SC judges only for terrorism/war against nation cases.
    2)-Time bound trial with regular hearings.
    3)-No transfer of judges of this court before they deliver the final judgement for a particular case.
    4)-No provision of MERCY PETITION to president for all terrorism/war against nation cases.

    So, in short give all terrorists a fair chance to defend themselves, but at least there should be no delay once the final verdict is out.
     
  2. Khan

    Khan 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    you have noted some key points, one of our biggest problems in Afghanistan is that many captured killers go free because of our corrupt judicial system and incompotent officials. the same thing happens in Paksitan too.
    :shocked:
     
  3. Nirvana

    Nirvana Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    WORLD INFO: The mafia ride a black Bajaj Pulsar

    Was watching News , Investigating team Is also Pointing Out this maoist Connection to the Blast.Since Some Months ago 50 Detonators gone Missing from Silvassa

    Was Revealed By J Dey at Mid Day in His Last Article
     
  4. Nirvana

    Nirvana Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Inept rule makes India a soft target | The Australian

    IN words made famous by Ronald Reagan during a presidential debate with Jimmy Carter in 1980, here we go again. Three serial blasts in 12 minutes tore through India's commercial capital, Mumbai, on Wednesday evening, leaving 21 dead and more than 140 injured.

    Can any other major city match Mumbai's record as the terrorists' target of choice: in 1993, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2008 and 2011?

    The Times of India listed 21 incidents of "major blasts" in India between October 2005 and December. Most were homegrown. But the most spectacular have had some Pakistan links, including those of November 26, 2008, in which 166 people were killed.

    Five years ago, on July 11, 2006, seven bombs on Mumbai commuter trains killed more than 200 and injured another 700. The co-ordinated nature of Wednesday's attacks and the choice of Mumbai as the target suggest this too may have a foreign footprint.

    The modus operandi points to the involvement of the banned Indian Mujaheddin, which works closely with the Pakistan-based Lashkar-e-Toiba terrorist outfit.

    The resilience displayed by Mumbaikars in previous incidents will come to the fore again, but with each fresh incident, anger at government incompetence, callousness and indifference grows.

    The persistence of domestic and cross-border terrorism is an indictment of multiple dimensions of governance in India.

    The Manmohan Singh government is proving to be among the weakest and most ineffectual in independent Indian history.

    It seems to soak up the warm and fuzzy feelings of rhetorical pats on the back from foreign leaders about courage, resilience, patience and refusal to be provoked into any retaliatory action against countries from where the attacks originate.

    Instead of credible threats and effective action against terrorists, the Prime Minister urges calm on citizens.

    Anyone can counsel caution. The real challenge is to offer practical suggestions on what to do, not what to avoid doing. The undying proof of India as a soft state earns the contempt of Islamists at a government that is all bark and no bite -- except that, frankly, even the barks are getting fewer and fainter -- and the cynical resignation of citizens.

    The secret to India's economic success, it is claimed, is that the economy grows mainly during the night, when the government is asleep. But the government has to be very much in charge in providing the public goods of law, order and security. Can the Indian government drum up the necessary courage to address grievances, modernise security services, and confront Pakistan?

    India's Muslims have many justified grievances. Most notoriously in the recent past, the perpetrators of massacres of Muslims in Gujarat in 2002 are yet to be arrested, tried, convicted and sentenced. This stokes Muslim anger and thirst for vengeance.

    Yet terrorists are rarely prosecuted through the creaky and leaking criminal justice system. Detaining suspects indefinitely without trial adds to anger in one community without bringing closure to victims' families and in turn inflames Hindu anger.

    The quality of India's police and security personnel and their training, arming and conditions of service need to be upgraded substantially and urgently.

    The elite commandos are siphoned off for VIP protection duty, leaving ordinary citizens to fend for themselves.

    Terrorists have attacked India repeatedly with planning, training and financing based in Pakistan. Pakistan's military-intelligence-jihadi complex has been lethally effective in outsourcing terrorism as an instrument of policy.

    The lack of an effective response keeps India bleeding and keeps the policy cost-free for Pakistan. India must find a formula that raises the costs to Pakistan by recalibrating the balance between no action and limited but effective military response.

    Pakistan's record of double-dealing, deceit and denial has been based on four degrees of separation between the government, army, intelligence and terrorists whose plausibility is rapidly fading; it is exploited as a convenient but increasingly implausible alibi to escape accountability.

    Any action carries the risk of destabilising Pakistan still more. That is no longer an unacceptable risk. India would unquestionably be better off with a stable and prosperous neighbour.

    But for more than a decade, even as Pakistan has teetered on the brink of collapse and disintegration and been reduced to a bit player, India has prospered and emerged as a major world player.

    Ideally, Pakistan's military must be brought under civilian control and the two countries' governments can then co-operate in ridding the subcontinent of the scourge of terrorism.

    If the establishment of civilian supremacy over Pakistan's military intelligence services proves impossible, India should adopt the policy of taking the fight to the neighbouring territory from where terror attacks originate through strikes and targeted killings of terrorists.

    As India does not have such intelligence and military capacity today, it must invest all means necessary to acquire it.

    Only thus will India reverse the structure of incentives and penalties.
     
  5. Nirvana

    Nirvana Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Mumbai blasts: Terrorists behind bombings may not have been locals: Sources - The Economic Times

    MUMBAI/NEW DELHI: The terrorists who planted bombs at three sites in Mumbai may not have been locals, an examination of the CCTV footage collected from the sites of Wednesday's blasts has indicated, according to sources.

    The sources, who are in the know of the investigations into the bombings that left 17 dead and 131 injured, said the CCTV footage has so far hinted that the terrorists who planted the bombs may not belong to Mumbai.

    Investigation agencies are in possession of 11 CDs of CCTV footage recovered from the blast sites.

    The investigators are also working on a theory that the terrorists, who planted the bombs may have used a "safe house" in areas near the blast sites in Mumbai to manufacture the bombs.

    The theory is based on the fact that the bombs used were Improvised Explosive Devices made with ammonium nitrate and fuel oil, called ANFO. The sources added that it is difficult and dangerous to travel long distances with the prepared IED as it is unstable and can go off by even a slight spark.

    Even police patrolling at various places in and around Mumbai is so intense that the bombers may not have taken the risk of being caught with a bomb, they said.

    Two of the three blast sites - Zaveri Bazaar and Opera House are separated by a little over a kilometre and Dadar, the third site, is about 12 km away.

    That means, if a "safe house" was used it could be close to or around Zaveri Bazaar or Opera House.

    The sources said that the Intelligence Bureau had received an input from Hyderabad in February that some Indian Mujahideen men were planning to strike.


    But the information could not be followed because the terrorists have stopped using cellphones and emails, they said, and added that they may have met in person.

    Earlier, union Home Secretary R.K. Singh said Friday that probe agencies are scanning 11 CDs of CCTV footage for clues into the Mumbai serial bombings.

    The scooter on which one of the bombs was planted has also been identified, he added.

    "There are about 11 CDs (of CCTV footage) which have to be gone through, so it's a voluminous work. People who are not recognised by local people have to be put through a data base... the suspicious people are being verified," Singh told reporters.

    "We also have identified the scooter in which one of the bombs was planted. There are various leads based on our previous databases, various people are being questioned, so investigation is going on," he added.
     
  6. Nirvana

    Nirvana Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Mumbai blasts: Terror shatters lives before they begin : Mumbai Blasts 2011: India Today

    Eighteen people were killed in Wednesday's terrorist strike in Mumbai. The blasts changed the lives of many others in different parts of the country. While a young woman lost her fiancé, a young boy lost his father and a pregnant woman has lost her husband.

    Even as politicians announce relief and explain why they failed to stop these terror attacks, there is no consolation for those families whose loved ones died a horrible death.

    In an old Gujarati-dominated locality in south Mumbai, exposure to terrorism has come a bit too early for some children.

    Their friend, 13-year-old Meet, lost his father in the Mumbai blasts. Surrounded by friends, Meet may be too young to understand death, but he knows who's responsible for terror. "Terrorism is spread because of bad politicians," says Meet.

    Q: Did you ever think you will lose your father like this?
    Meet: No I couldn't have imagined it.

    Q: How much do you miss your dad?
    Meet: I miss him very much.

    Meet's father Sandip Shah, a diamond broker in Opera House, would have celebrated his 40th birthday on July 19. Sandip's wife was out shopping for a surprise gift when the blast wiped out all reasons for a celebration.

    "We have not been able to sleep ever since, every time I close my eyes, I think of Sandip Bhai," says a neighbour.

    Another neighbour says, "It still has not sunk in. It feels as if he has gone out to work and will be back soon. His wife, his son...he was such a nice man (breaks down)."

    In far away East Midnapore in West Bengal, gloom is all over the Nayaks' home. The blast in Zaveri Bazaar claimed the life of their elder son, 28 year-old Prabhat Nayak. They just had his mutilated body for cremation.

    Prabhat went to Mumbai 13 years ago to make a living. On July 13, terror brought an end to that dream.

    Prabhat's newly married wife is expecting their baby. But his family has not given up yet. His younger brother plans to be back on the same lanes of Zaveri Bazaar to pick up the threads of life again.
     
  7. Nirvana

    Nirvana Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Mumbai bomb blasts: These deaths could have been prevented

    Nothing has changed since I reported on the 1993 attacks. Ministers issue platitudes, shift blame and focus on the cricket


    This week's bomb blasts in Mumbai have stirred up uncomfortable memories in the city. In 1993 I was one of the few television reporters covering the first Mumbai serial bomb blasts. The shock of 13 co-ordinated explosions going off simultaneously in the city was unimaginable. The scale of the operation and the audacity with which it had been executed was appalling.

    Those attacks took place just after riots that followed the demolition of the Babri Masjid, and so there appeared to be a clear message. The deadly twisted wreckage spread through the city, and the enormous death toll revealed the malevolent design to hit India where it would hurt most. All the symbols of the city were carefully chosen: the stock market, Zaveri Bazaar, the Air India building … and so on.

    Hospitals were full and overflowing, with Mumbaikars as well as migrants, all of whom still throng into the city seeking their daily bread, or rozi roti. I still cannot forget the terrified eyes of the child labourer whose body was imbedded with shards of glass. Or the mother who wept for her dead child. Or the family that had lost their brother, father, husband.

    The government then, as now, spoke of intelligence failures. To cover up its mistakes, largesse was distributed to the families of the victims. A stunned city wrapped a bandage around its bleeding wounds, masked its grief and limped on. This was the first time we spoke about the "spirit of Mumbai". A cliche used every time the city is attacked. And each time the Mumbaikar realises, too late, that buried under this false praise he has been cheated of a secure life yet again.

    Looking at this week's attacks, one wonders if anything has changed. It certainly doesn't seem as if the authorities are any better prepared. And that is fuelling the Mumbaikars' anger. Eighteen years of paying for failures of policy, of intelligence, and of governance, has led to a loss of life which was preventable.

    There has been a shocking admission by the present chief minister, Prithviraj Chavan, that even the purchase of 5,000 CCTV cameras for Mumbai (a suggestion by the Ram Pradhan committee set up after the last attacks to examine security lapses) is still pending with the central government.

    Chavan also confessed that he could not get in touch with his own police chiefs for 15 minutes after the blasts because all the phone networks were clogged. If this is how rapidly the government responds to an attack, is it any surprise that Mumbaikars are furious with ministers who surround themselves with high security and bodyguards, but have no money to spend on the aam aadmi, the common man?

    The other worrying factor is that even after 48 hours since the incident, the government says it has no clue about the criminal mastermind behind it. This, some feel, could be a deliberate move since the Uttar Pradesh elections are around the corner, and it does not want to antagonise its Muslim vote through the old policy of arresting the usual suspects. In the past there have been embarrassing revelations about other blasts which had been blamed on Muslim "perpetrators" but are now said to have been committed by Hindu fundamentalists. However, the slow pace of investigations will also send out the wrong signal to the frustrated citizen.

    The Mumbai mood is one of impatience, but it is unlikely that anything will really change. One strong indication of the status quo is that the day after this horrific attack, the former chief minister Vilasrao Deshmukh, who is also a minister in the Union government, was actually standing for elections for president of the cash-rich Maharashtra Cricket Association. This got almost the same coverage in the media as the bomb blast story.

    The people of Mumbai who are orphaned and furious have little recourse than to curse Ajmal Qasab, the 2008 terrorist who is still behind bars in a Mumbai jail. "They spend crores [millions] on keeping him and Afzal Guru alive, but have no money to spend on us," was the complaint heard most often. (Afzal Guru was convicted for the attack on parliament in 2001.) Cricket as usual, one might say.

    Mumbai bomb blasts: These deaths could have been prevented | Kishwar Desai | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk
     
  8. abirbec04

    abirbec04 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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  9. Executioner

    Executioner FULL MEMBER

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    Yeh chaka Digvijaya aur iski chaki gov
     
  10. Sher Malang

    Sher Malang Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    RIP, why such terror action happens again and again in Mumbai? don't you guys think GOI should change it's soft policy towards such people?
     
  11. GUNS-N- ROSES

    GUNS-N- ROSES Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    it is difficult buddy but not impossible. i am sure given right political backing, training and resources it can be done.
     
  12. RoYaN

    RoYaN Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  13. Osiris

    Osiris Major SENIOR MEMBER

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  14. Nirvana

    Nirvana Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    Mumbai blasts: Cops unmask suspected Opera House bomber - The Times of India

    MUMBAI/AHMEDABAD: Police have zeroed in on a suspect at the site of the Opera House bombing after scanning the CCTV images they have retrieved from the 13/7 site. Investigators said the movements of one particular man, who locals and office-goers at the diamond-trading hub did not recognize, appear suspicious and they have prepared a sketch of him. The sketch has been sent to security agencies across the country, but won't be released to the public so that investigations are not hampered.

    Eleven people died in the Opera House blast in Wednesday's triple bombing. Another eight died at Zaveri Bazar.

    Investigators said the Opera House suspect is seen roaming the area for around two to three hours before the blast. "With the help of eyewitnesses and locals we are trying to identify individuals in the images. One such person has not been identified by the locals. We have prepared a sketch of this man. We have good leads with us," said Maharashtra Anti-Terrorism Squad (ATS) chief Rakesh Maria.

    The police are also focusing on 15 faces seen in CCTV images taken from the Zaveri Bazar blast site as locals, shopkeepers there could not recognize them.

    Maharashtra ATS teams also fanned out to places like Gujarat, Bengal and Bhatkal in Karnataka to follow up clues.

    Meanwhile, the Gujarat police believe they may have previously overlooked clues to the Mumbai blasts in emails sent by an arrested Indian Mujahideen (IM) member. The emails of Danish Riyaz, 29, who was arrested nearly 20 days before the Mumbai blasts, appear innocuous, but may have hidden information that could provide leads, said investigators. Danish was held for the July 26, 2008 Ahmedabad serial blasts.

    The Ahmedabad crime branch is looking for leads in four emails sent by Danish to IM top brass, including Abdus Subhan alias Tauqeer, Manzhar Chaudhary, Abu Faisal and Mujeeb Sheikh. TOI reported on Saturday that Faisal and Sheikh were caught by the ATS recently and were a focal point of the investigation. Investigators believe that Mujeeb may know the identity of the five to six bombers. The Gujarat police have also found the name of Haroon, who is from Kolkata and a suspect in the Mumbai blasts, in Danish's mailing list.

    When Danish was first probed, the emails didn't make sense, but now the Ahmedabad crime branch is taking help from central agencies to read the fine print. The police suspect he knows the whereabouts of Tauqeer and Chaudhary. Tauqeer, who allegedly masterminded the Ahmedabad blasts, is said to be at the UP-Nepal border. The Gujarat police suspect that youths from Azamgarh, UP, were also used in the 13/7 blasts and have sent a team there. The National Investigation Agency (NIA) interrogated Danish two days ago and is sure that Faisal and Sheikh know about the Mumbai attacks. Faisal practises alternate medicine in Indore, MP, and is Danish's senior in the IM. Sheikh belongs to Juhapura, Ahmedabad.

    Interestingly, 35 detonators and explosive substances, including ammonium nitrate, went missing from the Silvassa police's custody in Gujarat in May-June. The equipment had been seized from suspects.

    Maharashtra ATS teams have left for various locations, like Gujarat, West Bengal, Bhopal, Pune, Sarai Mir in Uttar Pradesh, Bhatkal in Karnataka, Delhi and so on. "The NIA and other central agencies are also assisting the probe," said Maria at a press briefing on Saturday.

    Maria has sought details of two associates of Abdullah, a Kolkata resident, from West Bengal Special Task Force chief, Rajib Kumar. The two, like Abdullah, are missing. Maria was tightlipped when asked whether there was local support or if the Mumbai underworld played a role in the blasts.

    "All three bombs were of high intensity," he said. He said three digital timed devices were used in the bombs. "We still don't know whether a cellular phone was used to trigger the bombs. A forensic report is awaited," he added. "We are ruling out the possibility of a suicide bomber."

    On the explosives used, he said, "The strong presence of ammonium nitrate has been found but we are trying to find out the other ingredients." Sources said that TNT, which has been used in blasts in India, could have been used along with ammonium nitrate. Sources said that if TNT was mixed with ammonium nitrate, it would suggest good skills in bomb making. It is learnt that several police teams are being helped by "neutralized" IM and Simi members. They are helping police visit suspects across the country. It is learnt that at least 10 neutralized IM or Simi members are assisting the police.

    A joint Mumbai ATS and crime branch team returned empty handed from Indore on Saturday morning. The team had questioned eight suspected Simi members. "Five of them are still in jail while three have been granted bail," said an ATS source.

    At least six teams are scanning the CCTV footage. "It's a voluminous and tedious process," said Maria. An ATS officer said, "We are working on all unidentified people. Each CCTV frame has more than six to seven people at a time and we have to check the whole day's CCTV images."

    "The forensic experts have collected debris that contain metal, which we suspect was part of containers used to store and transport the bombs.... However, it's too early to say whether they were tiffin boxes," Maria said. The forensic experts said the metal pieces found at the three sites are similar, but tiny. Forensic experts are yet to conclude whether the metal is steel or aluminum. The Zaveri Bazar blast took place outside a scrap shop, which already had a lot of metal pieces.

    "Several motorcycles and scooters were recovered from the spots and the owners are being called and verified. Investigators are still working on one scooter which has not been claimed," said Maria.

    Phone interceptions are on and over a hundred new phones are under surveillance. The police are also examining two calls made after the blasts from Jalna and Aurangabad districts to the police control room. Forensic experts and investigators will be recreating the blast scenes to verify the intensity of the blasts.
     
  15. abirbec04

    abirbec04 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Investigative agencies are saying IM (Indian Mujahideen) and SIMI (Student Islamic Movement India), they aren't saying Sri Ram Sene or Baba Ramdev. Get that through your thick head for once and stop mocking the dead. Enough of this sham. If you can't call a "Spade a Spade", at least show some sensitivity towards the people who lost their lives.

    If you believe IM and SIMI are saints and you like Diggy only can see Saffron Boogeyman terrorizing your life from every angle then you are most welcome, just don't post such stupid comments and dishonor the dead.

    It is because of his relentless stupidity of garnering Minority Votes that he has created a situation where Pakistan is starting to ask us about Samjhauta Express and Zaid Hamid justifies jehadis as a response to the Saffron boogey. Do you not follow news or is minority politics so important that it has to come at the expense of India's foreign policy.

    http://indiatoday.intoday.in/site/story/india-may-share-samjhauta-chargesheet-with-pak/1/142168.html

    Diggy has tunnel vision, he thinks rambling like a dog for his master will get him the post of his chief chaprusi when the Prince is ready to take the throne. Has he ever considered what would happen if his master doesn't get elected? Or for that matter his slip-ups cost the Madam an election? Then his very masters would throw him to the wolves. Do you for once think that making these statements he is able to do any good - its this arrogance that kicked his party out of MP and soon probably out of Maharashtra and from national politics as well.

    Well frankly speaking we are praying that he brain farts even more. The longer he is there doing his verbal diarrhea the better it is for his opponents. So, if I am a Congress supporter I would seriously wish that Diggy is thrown to the gallows otherwise there won't be anybody other than a few minority blocks left to vote for Congress. :sarcastic:
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2011
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