Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

F-35 Lightning II : News & Discussions

Discussion in 'The Americas' started by Picard, Sep 4, 2012.

  1. halloweene

    halloweene Major MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Messages:
    4,176
    Likes Received:
    2,079
    You mean those old OPERATIONAL planes? No clue apart from journalist quotes, but if you compare official to official domestic numbers, Rafale is still much cheaper...
     
  2. BMD

    BMD Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    8,731
    Likes Received:
    2,294
    Country Flag:
    United Kingdom
  3. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,000
    Likes Received:
    2,256
    Country Flag:
    United States
    Cheap at 240 million $. don't see any first world countries buying them.
     
  4. halloweene

    halloweene Major MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Messages:
    4,176
    Likes Received:
    2,079
    You are comparing apples to oranges. Let's stick on fly-away officially documented costs?
     
  5. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,000
    Likes Received:
    2,256
    Country Flag:
    United States
    Why would nay one pay 240 million for a plane that any decent antiaircraft system could knock out of the sky.
     
  6. Picdelamirand-oil

    Picdelamirand-oil Lt. Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,398
    Likes Received:
    4,839
    Country Flag:
    France
    Yes why? :2GUNS::fighting1::artillery::fans::rafale::France:
     
  7. BON PLAN

    BON PLAN Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2015
    Messages:
    2,172
    Likes Received:
    849
    Country Flag:
    France
    DOT&E Memo: F-35 Still Challenged
    Nov 16, 2016by Lara Seligman in Ares

    The Pentagon's top weapons tester has never been shy about hammering Lockheed Martin's F-35. In an Oct. 14 memo to the Defense Secretary, Director of Operational Test and Evaluation J. Michael Gilmore once again slammed the program for continued schedule delays, insufficient testing progress, and ongoing challenges with major systems. He "very strongly" recommended DOD restructure the program.



    [​IMG]


    The full 8-page document surfaces as Gilmore turns up the heat on the F-35 program. In the memo, Gilmore repeated his claim that the F-35 “clearly” will not be able to finish its development phase - called System Development and Demonstration (SDD) – and begin operational testing as planned in August 2017. The full flight envelope, weapons clearances and verified mission data file for the aircraft’s final warfighting software load, Block 3F, will not be available before May 2018, DOT&E states in the memo.

    In fact, Gilmore believes IOT&E likely won’t start until late 2018 or early 2019, unless DOD decides to start the test phase without “significant aspects” of full 3F capability, a DOT&E spokesman recently told Aviation Week.

    The program office is more optimistic. Top officials have acknowledged the F-35 will not be ready for its final test phase until 2018 at the earliest, but Joint Program Office (JPO) chief Lt. Gen. Christopher Bogdan anticipates IOT&E will begin early that year.

    The JPO estimates the program will need an additional $530 million to complete the $57 billion SDD program, primarily to pay for new requirements and unforeseen delays, according to spokesman Joe DellaVedova.

    “Most of this needed funding will come from other F-35 JPO funding sources to minimize the impact on the U.S. Services and DoD overall budget requirements,” DellaVedova says. “No additional funding will be required from the International Partners.”

    Unless the F-35 program’s current plans are revised and additional resources provided, DOT&E says it is “unlikely” that the low-rate initial production (LRIP) lot 10 F-35s delivered in fiscal 2018 will have full combat capability, according to the DOT&E spokesman. This projection is significant for the Air Force, particularly, as Secretary Deborah Lee James recently certified to the congressional defense committees in compliance with the FY16 National Defense Authorization Act that the F-35As delivered in FY18 would indeed have their full warfighting capability.

    But for now, the Air Force is not worried.

    “The Air Force considered multiple factors and inputs from various entities before certification,” says Air Force spokesman Capt. Michael Hertzog. “With some additional risk today, we believe Block 3F with full hardware, software, and weapons capabilities planned will be available to support LRIP 10 aircraft.
     
    Pundrick likes this.
  8. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,000
    Likes Received:
    2,256
    Country Flag:
    United States
    Are we in a hurry. The F35 is a platform that is meant to change and adapt to the future. As long as there is no substantial threat there not in any real need to rush. USA has some 15000 planes 3 times as many as anyone else now.
     
  9. BON PLAN

    BON PLAN Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2015
    Messages:
    2,172
    Likes Received:
    849
    Country Flag:
    France
    15000 planes? are you sure?
    Some details please.
     
  10. BON PLAN

    BON PLAN Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2015
    Messages:
    2,172
    Likes Received:
    849
    Country Flag:
    France
    Pentagon Memo: F-35 Capabilities in Jeopardy
    By: Dan Grazier | November 16, 2016


    [​IMG]






    When F-35 Joint Strike Fighter pilots take to the air in coming years, not only will their plane not be suitable for combat, it won’t even be fully developed. Indeed, performance in multiple essential mission areas will be “unacceptable,” according to the Pentagon’s top weapon testing official.

    In a memo obtained by the Project On Government Oversight, Dr. Michael Gilmore, Director, Operational Test and Evaluation (DOT&E), warns that the Joint Strike Fighter Program Office (JPO) has decided to cut short the F-35’s development phase in order to pretend that schedule and cost goals are being met.

    http://www.pogo.org/straus/issues/d...-defense.net/forum/topic/29-le-f-35/?page=645
     
  11. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2010
    Messages:
    15,000
    Likes Received:
    2,256
    Country Flag:
    United States
    Pogo is an antimilitary site, The F35 is the ultimate in aerial warfare, designed to remain a generation ahead of the rest of the world.
     
  12. halloweene

    halloweene Major MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Messages:
    4,176
    Likes Received:
    2,079
    Well...look at the original report of DOT&E then... Ultimate my a...
     
  13. BON PLAN

    BON PLAN Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2015
    Messages:
    2,172
    Likes Received:
    849
    Country Flag:
    France
    ultimate ? as the F105 or F104 of its time?
     
  14. R!CK

    R!CK 2nd Lieutant Technical Analyst

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2016
    Messages:
    392
    Likes Received:
    1,080
    Country Flag:
    India
    Latest Lot 10 Contract Implies F-35 Costs Dropped 25% In 3 Weeks

    Lockheed Martin Corp., Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, is being awarded a $7,189,297,142 undefinitized not-to-exceed modification to the previously awarded low-rate initial production Lot 10 F-35 Lightning II advance acquisition contract (N00019-15-C-0003).

    This modification provides for the procurement of 90 aircraft, comprised of:
    -- 76 F-35A aircraft for the Air Force (44), non-U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) participants (16), and Foreign Military Sales (FMS) customers (16);
    -- 12 F-35B aircraft for the Marine Corps (9), and non-U.S. DoD participants (3); and
    -- two F-35C aircraft for the Navy.

    [​IMG]

    In addition, this modification provides for diminishing manufacturing and material shortages redesign and management; non-recurring engineering, changes to correct deficiencies resulting from concurrency between systems development and demonstration and production; and unique requirements for non-U.S. participants and FMS customers.

    Work will be performed in Fort Worth, Texas (30 percent); El Segundo, California (25 percent); Warton, United Kingdom (20 percent); Orlando, Florida (10 percent); Nashua, New Hampshire (5 percent); Nagoya, Japan (5 percent); and Baltimore, Maryland (5 percent), and is expected to be completed in March 2020.

    Fiscal 2016 aircraft procurement (Navy/Marine Corps and Air Force); and non-U.S. DoD participant and FMS funding in the amount of $1,280,306,832 are being obligated on this award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.

    This contract combines purchases for the Air Force ($3,397,703,267; 47.3%); Navy ($1,005,133,523; 13.9%); non-DoD participants ($1,507,557,938; 21.0%); and FMS customers ($1,278,902,414; 17.8%).

    The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

    (EDITOR’S NOTE: The above contract would have us believe that, in less than three weeks since Nov. 2, the Pentagon and Lockheed Martin have resolved their differences on the F-35 prices that had delayed award of the Lot 9 contract for two years.
    When the Pentagon on Nov. 2 awarded the main Lot 9 contract, it used a “unilateral contract action” and forced Lockheed to accept its price after negotiations had become deadlocked.
    As the Lot 10 but as the above contract returns to the standard contract form, it is clear that both sides have agreed the price this time around.
    Such a speedy resolution strains belief.
    But an even bigger surprise is that it would appear from this contract that, during those same three weeks, the F-35’s price has dropped 25%.
    How can this be?
    The main Lot 9 contract, awarded Nov. 2 but not yet made public, covers 57 F-35s and is worth $6.1 billion. This implies an average cost of $107 million per aircraft, not counting the engine, which is contracted separately.
    The main Lot 10 contract released Nov 23 (above) funds 90 aircraft for $7.2 billion, or an average cost of $79.9 million, also without engine.
    That is a drop of 25% in exactly 21 days. How credible can it be?
    The probable answer is that there is no such drop, but that the intricate contracting agreements between the F-35 Joint Program Office and Lockheed Martin allow all sorts of bookkeeping liberties that muddy the waters and do not allow a precise calculation of costs, perhaps not unintentionally.
    Finally, an ancillary observation: the US Navy continues to drag its feet on buying the F-35, and has this time ordered only two F-35Cs, compared to the US Air Force’s 44. The question again arises of whether the Navy in fact ever intends to deploy the F-35C.
    We will return to the subject of F-35 contracts soon.)


    http://defensenews-alert.blogspot.com/2016/11/latest-lot-10-contract-implies-f-35.html
     
    Agent_47 and Bregs like this.
  15. BON PLAN

    BON PLAN Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2015
    Messages:
    2,172
    Likes Received:
    849
    Country Flag:
    France
    I ve seen that Canada is thinking about a small order of SH18 (18)
    1) May be it's just the first of some other orders. So bye bye F35 in Canada.
    2) It's just an interim solution so as to see where the F35 is going, and what will be the real and final spec of this bird, but at the end fewer F35 will be baught.

    In all the case it's a camouflaged for JSF. :devilwork::devilwork::devilwork:
     

Share This Page