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F-35 Lightning II : News & Discussions

Discussion in 'The Americas' started by Picard, Sep 4, 2012.

  1. BMD

    BMD Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    An F-35A Lightning II from the 34th Fighter Squadron at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, lands at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, April 15, 2017. The aircraft arrival marks the first F-35A fighter training deployment to the U.S. European Command area of responsibility or any overseas location as a flying training deployment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Eric Burks)
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    F-35A Lightning II's from the 34th Fighter Squadron at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, land at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, April 15, 2017. The aircraft arrival marks the first F-35A fighter training deployment to the U.S. European Command area of responsibility or any overseas location as a flying training deployment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Matthew Plew)
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    An F-35 Lightning II from the 34th Fighter Squadron at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, taxis in at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, April 15, 2017. The aircraft arrival marks the first F-35A fighter training deployment to the U.S. European Command area of responsibility or any overseas location as a flying training deployment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Emerson Nuñez)
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  2. BMD

    BMD Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    F/A-XX Block 1.

    Or:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MoD_Boscombe_Down

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HOTOL

     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2017
  3. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Air Force kicks off Atlantic Trident exercise with the F-35 and British and French partners
    By: Christopher Diamond, April 11, 2017 (Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Kayla Newman)
    off Atlantic Trident exercise with the F-35 and British and French partners
    By: Christopher Diamond, April 11, 2017 (Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Kayla Newman)
    Beginning on Wednesday, American airmen will partner with their British and French counterparts for the 2017 Atlantic Trident exercise at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, according to the Air Force.

    The exercise will be hosted by the 1st Fighter Wing. Airmen from the British Royal Air Force and the French Air Force will participate in exercises aimed at enhancing interoperability through combined coalition aerial campaigns. The exercise, featuring the new F-35 Lightning II, is one of the first to focus on integrating fifth-generation fighter capabilities, according to the Air Force.

    In addition to the F-35, the exercise will feature the F-22 Raptor, as well as the Brits' Eurofighter Typhoon and the French Dassault Rafale. U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagles and T-38 Talons will take on the role of adversary aircraft for the exercise.

    Additionally, U.S. Air Force E-3 Sentry and KC-10 Extender aircraft will support the exercise.

    “This exercise was designed to encourage the sharing and development of air combat [tactics, techniques and procedures] with our French and U.K. partners, against a range of potential threats leveraging U.S. Air Force fifth-generation capabilities,” said Col. Peter Fesler, the 1st Fighter Wing commander. “This is not only an opportunity to share the capabilities of the aircraft, pilots and maintainers between our nations, but to build friendship, trust and confidence that will improve our interoperability as we go forward.”

    About 225 American airmen are expected to participate in the exercise, as well as 175 personnel from the British Royal Air Force and 150 from the French Air Force. The exercise kicks off Wednesday and ends April 28.

    A similar exercise — this one without the F-35 — was held at Joint Base Langley-Eustis in December 2015.
     
  4. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    U.S. sending F-35 fighters to Europe for training: Pentagon
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    Reuters
    April 14, 2017
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Air Force will this weekend deploy a small number of F-35A fighter jets to Europe for several weeks of training with other U.S. and NATO military aircraft, the Pentagon said on Friday.

    In a statement, the Pentagon said that the deployment would allow the U.S. Air Force to "further demonstrate the operational capabilities" of the stealthy fighter jet. It did not name the countries where the aircraft would be deployed to.

    The F-35, which is the Pentagon's costliest arms program, has been dogged by problems. The Pentagon's chief arms buyer once described as "acquisition malpractice" the decision to produce jets before completing development.

    During last year's election campaign, President Donald Trump criticized Lockheed Martin Corp for the F-35's cost overruns.

    Days after taking office in January, Trump announced his administration had been able to cut some $600 million from the latest U.S. deal to buy about 90 F-35 Joint Strike Fighters.

    The United States is expected to spend some $391 billion over 15 years to buy about 2,443 of the F-35 aircraft.

    F-35s are in use by the U.S. Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy, and by six countries: Australia, Britain, Norway, Italy, the Netherlands and Israel. Japan took delivery of its first jet in December.

    Lockheed said last month that Spain, Belgium and Switzerland were in talks with the company about buying F-35s.
     
  5. BON PLAN

    BON PLAN Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    All is said Bro.
     
  6. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Notice the F35 uses
    270 VDC due to stealth concerns and design changes in modern fighter aircraft
     
  7. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    F-35 Needs More Potent Adversary Services

    ARLINGTON, Va. — The F-35 Lightning II strike fighter is easily able to counter the adversary services aircraft thrown at it in numbers, said an official of an adversary services contractor, who added that the industry is facing challenges in coming up with a realistic threat aircraft for training for high-end combat.

    “Nothing gets close to these things [the F-35s]” said Jeffrey Parker, a former Air Force fighter pilot and chief executive of ATAC LLC, a Textron company that provides opposing aircraft for U.S. fighter squadrons and electronic threat simulation against Navy strike groups. “I’ve flown against the [Marine] F-35Bs down at [Marine Corps Air Station] Beaufort [S.C.] It’s an impressive airplane. Even in the hands of students, it’s a very capable fighter.”

    Parker also said that increased adversary services are needed by the Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps to reduce the fatigue-life toll on use of the services’ own front-line fighters and their limited flight hours in the adversary role.

    The Navy “has a shortage of readiness training, so they’re reaching out to industry to try to solve that problem,” Parker said. “They’re using too much ‘gray air’ [warfighting aircraft].”

    He said each adversary aircraft that flies 250 hours a year is the equivalent of freeing an F/A-18 Super Hornet for fleet use for a year. Ten ATAC aircraft in use for 250 hours each can extend the lives of 10 Super Hornets per year.

    The Navy has three squadrons of dedicated adversary aircraft with third-generation F-5 or fourth-generation F/A-18 fighters and the Marine Corps fields one squadron of F-5s. The Navy’s Topgun school also uses F/A-18 and F-16 adversary aircraft. The Air Force operates two adversary F-16 squadrons. Companies like ATAC use foreign-built aircraft such as the supersonic F-21 Kfir and slower Hawker Hunter to supplement with adversary services.

    “The Navy squadrons are hurting on aircraft,” Parker said. “They don’t have enough. They’re also trying to upgrade their training from third-generation aircraft like F-5s to fourth-generation aircraft like F/A-18s and F-16s.

    “The aircraft shortages in training are made worse by the F-35 fifth-generation aircraft, which you need a lot of ‘bad guys’ for,” he said.

    Parker told Seapower that more fourth-generation fighters are needed to meet the increasing demand for adversary services, but that “not enough fourth-gen aircraft in the world are available to industry. Nobody can provide it all, nor can all of us [the adversary companies] provide it together, at least in the next five years or so.”

    Because of restrictions in U.S. law, the adversary contractors cannot purchase or lease fourth-generation fighters from the U.S. aircraft in desert storage. As such, they go to foreign nations like Israel for retired jets to bring to the United States.

    The Navy has issued a draft Request for Proposals for fourth-generation adversary services for the Naval Aviation Warfighting Center at Naval Air Station Fallon, Nev., looking for F-16- or SU-27-like capability with an upgraded radar.

    “There’s only one category of radar [that can meet specifications] — an AESA [electronically scanned array radar],” he said.

    For cost reasons, Parker said, single-engine jets are needed, rather than two-engine aircraft.
    The ability of the F-22 Raptor and F-35 to track and engage large numbers of aircraft means that large numbers of adversary aircraft are needed to provide a realistic scenario for training the pilots. For example, the Air Force stations a number of T-38 supersonic trainers at Langley Air Force Base, Va., to provide enough bogeys to challenge the F-22s based there.

    “The Raptor is such an uneven fight, that if you send out two Raptors against anything else, there’s no challenge, no work for the pilots to do. For a ‘two-ship’ they want 12 bandits.

    “What we see going on is a maturation of the industry” he said. “By going to the fourth-generation level, the Navy is acknowledging that these programs are going to be around and integrated at the highest levels, because now they have radar; pulling 9 gs [nine times the force of gravity] at the merge; [and] helmet off-boresight capability.”

    Source
     
  8. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Home / Defense News
    Norway tests added parachute braking system for F-35
    A drogue parachute braking system to help F-35s land in icy conditions is being evaluated by Norway.

    By Richard Tomkins | April 19, 2017 at 3:02 PM

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    An artist's image of an F-35 landing on an icy runway with the help of a drogue parachute system. Norwegian Ministry of Defense image.


    April 19 (UPI) -- Norway has begun testing a drogue parachute braking system for use on F-35 Lightning II aircraft ordered from the United States, the Ministry of Defense says.

    The Norwegian testing of the system, which will help the aircraft land on icy and windy runways, began Easter Sunday using a specially instrumented AF-2 jet.


    The Ministry said the testing is a two-stage program. The first stage tests is to evaluate how an F-35 would behavesin the air with a fitted drogue parachute, and how the drogue parachute would function on dry and wet runways.


    Phase Two involves using the parachute braking system on icy runway.

    "Integration of the brake chute on Norwegian fighter aircraft is important to us," Norwegian Defense Ministry's State Secretary Øystein Bø said in a press release. "We rely on the F-35 to operate in extreme winter conditions, just like the F-16 can. That's why we put so much effort into getting a specially-developed brake chute on our F-35."

    The testing is being conducted at Edwards Air Force Base in California and Eielson Air Force Base in Alaska.

    Norway, which is cooperating with the Netherlands for development of the braking system and its monitor, receives its first F-35 in November.
     
  9. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    US, UK leaders mark F-35A program milestone
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    Photo By Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield | An F-35 Lightning II from the 34th Fighter Squadron at Hill Air Force Base, Utah,...... read more read more

    Photo By Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield | An F-35 Lightning II from the 34th Fighter Squadron at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, launches for a sortie at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, April 19, 2017. The fifth generation, multi-role fighter aircraft is deployed here to maximize training opportunities, affirm enduring commitments to NATO allies, and deter any actions that destabilize regional security. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield) see less | View Image Page

    UNITED KINGDOM
    04.19.2017
    Courtesy Story
    48th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

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    ROYAL AIR FORCE LAKENHEATH, United Kingdom – Senior leaders from the U.S. Department of State, U.S. Air Force and the Royal Air Force gathered to highlight a significant F-35A Lightning II program milestone, April 19.

    The representatives came together to provide a press briefing discussing the first ever, long-planned flying training deployment to an overseas location of the Air Force’s newest operational 5th-generation fighter.

    As the first F-35A flying training deployment to an overseas location, the aircraft and total force Airmen, deployed from the 388th and 419th Fighter Wings, Hill Air Force Base, Utah, will spend several weeks in Europe deployed to multiple NATO bases in an effort to maximize training opportunities and visibly demonstrate U.S. support to NATO.

    In his remarks at the event, General Tod Wolters, USAFE-AFAFRICA commander, discussed the importance of the training deployment.

    “This flying training deployment provides the opportunity for combat-ready aircraft to train alongside Allies and other types of Air Force aircraft in a realistic training environment, enhancing integration between the U.S. and its Allies,” said Wolters.

    “The sovereignty of the skies over NATO nations is paramount. This training signifies natural progression of the F-35 program. It allows us the opportunity to demonstrate and obtain the confidence in operational and interoperability characteristics of the system.”

    In addition to conducting flying training, the deployment also provides an opportunity to test bed-down capabilities for the aircraft, associated personnel and equipment as the 48th Fighter Wing at RAF Lakenheath is set to gain F-35As beginning in the early 2020s.

    Ahead of RAF Lakenheath, the Royal Air Force is on track to begin receiving F-35Bs as early as next year. The U.K. shares a vested interest in the training deployment, as highlighted by RAF Air Marshal Stuart Atha, Deputy Commander of Operations.

    “This deployment to RAF Lakenheath over the next couple of weeks is yet another step on the journey of unlocking the potential for this aircraft,” said Atha.

    “Whether it’s about how we support, how we maintain, or how we employ this capability, it’s not going to operate in isolation, it needs to be integrated. It needs to be integrated with other air forces and it needs to be stitched into the NATO fabric.”

    Chargé d'Affaires Lewis Lukens, acting ambassador and chief operating officer of the U.S. mission in the United Kingdom, also attended the event and described the importance of the F-35 program in the United Kingdom.

    “The F-35 represents the best of American and British engineering and technological advancement,” said Lukens. “I am proud that this program provides significant economic benefits for both of our countries.”

    According to Lukens, the F-35 program is creating an estimated 24,000 jobs and will produce an estimated three billion pounds over the course of the program in business for U.K. companies.

    Lukens also emphasized the importance of continued security partnerships in Europe which are critical to ensuring security for the United States, NATO Allies and European partners.

    “The United States is fully committed to defending our NATO allies, and together with the United Kingdom we will continue to strengthen the alliance to adapt to today’s most pressing challenges.”

    (Article by Capt. Sybil Taunton, USAFE-AFAFRICA-United Kingdom)
     
  10. BMD

    BMD Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    http://indiandefence.com/threads/british-armed-forces-thread.48729/page-29#post-554506

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  11. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Lockheed's F-35, F-22 May Soon Face Their Moment Of Truth

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    Reprints

    American taxpayers could soon find out if they got their money's worth from the costliest fighter jets in the U.S. arsenal, as new air-defense systems render the legacy fleet too vulnerable to lead the charge in contested airspace.

    Russia's S-400 system, which is deployed in Syria and spreading to other U.S. adversaries, poses a particular threat to "fourth generation" aircraft like the F-16, F-15 and F/A-18. Analysts and military officials believe that Lockheed Martin's (LMT) F-22 and F-35 as well as Northrop Grumman's (NOC) B-2 bomber could be the only aircraft effective against the S-400 due to their stealth capabilities.

    "Fourth gen will continue to have a role in some of these other areas we are looking," said Lt. Gen. Jerry Harris — the Air Force's deputy chief of staff for strategic plans, programs and requirements — after a Senate hearing in March. "But, again, as the world grows and these threats proliferate in Syria and Iran and other locations, they are going to push fourth gen out quicker than planned."

    The accelerated threat assessment comes as President Trump looks to add at least 100 combat aircraft to the U.S. fleet. He hasn't specified which models will be in the mix but has been critical of the F-35's $400 billion acquisition price tag, hinting it could be pitted against Boeing's (BA) F/A-18 Super Hornet and saying in February that he was "looking seriously at a big order."

    The implications for the defense industry extend beyond Lockheed's F-35, which several U.S. allies are buying in addition to the 2,443 the Pentagon is procuring for the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps.

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    Boeing is trying to maintain a foothold in the combat aircraft market after losing the B-21 bomber contract to Northrop, and wants to keep its Super Hornet in production despite international demand for more advanced fighters. And last year, Congress asked the Air Force to assess the costs of restarting Lockheed's F-22 program, which was canceled in 2009 less than halfway through its production run due to spiraling costs.

    For now, the still-limited availability of fifth-generation fighters like the F-22 and F-35 means the backbone of the U.S. fighter fleet will continue to be older planes. The Air Force said earlier this month that it will extend the service life of the F-16 by 50% to 12,000 flight hours as the service hopes to keep the plane flying until the 2040s. And Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein recently sounded ambivalent about retiring the F-15 next decade as planned.

    IBD'S TAKE: The Aerospace/Defense industry group ranked No. 45 on Thursday among the 197 industries tracked by IBD. It has climbed 19% since the election, as Trump promises to increase defense spending. Raytheon re-entered buy range, and Northrop is forming a cup-with-handle base with a 249.53 buy point, while Lockheed has regained its 270 entry. Boeing is consolidating in a flat base with a 185.81 buy point.

    Why The S-400 Is Different
    While U.S. airspace dominance has gone unquestioned for decades, the S-400's introduction has helped tip the scales, and growing tensions with Russia and its allies are making the skies above the Middle East more dangerous.

    After the U.S. launched Raytheon (RTN) Tomahawk cruise missiles at a Syrian airbase April 6 in response to a suspected chemical weapons attack by President Bashar Assad's forces, the Kremlin vowed to deploy more air defenses to Syria "very soon," according to Russia's Interfax.

    Before the Tomahawk strike, the U.S. had avoided Assad's military. But with the U.S. mission in Syria possibly expanding, American pilots may find themselves intentionally or unintentionally in the S-400's cross hairs.

    Russia already has one of its S-400 systems in western Syria near Turkey, but it's possible another could be among those deployed to beef up Syrian defenses. Meanwhile, Syrian forces have moved most of their fixed-wing aircraft to Russia's Khmeimim airbase, where the S-400 is also deployed, for protection against another U.S. strike.

    Russia claims the system can track 300 targets simultaneously and has an operational range of up to 250 nautical miles. China finalized an order for the S-400 in 2015 with delivery expected next year, and an even more advanced S-500 is in the works.

    Moscow may be exaggerating the S-400's details. But what's widely accepted is that it represents a unique threat to the U.S. because of its ability to detect incoming aircraft from longer ranges.

    The S-400's radar can spot a fourth-generation fighter before the fighter's radar can pick up the air-defense system, according to Mark Bobbi, an aerospace, defense and security analyst at consultancy IHS. A stealth fighter, however, would only be detectable at close range.

    The F-22 has 360-degree stealth, while the infrared signature of the F-35's engine makes it more vulnerable from the back, Bobbi noted. Still, he thinks the F-35 "would lead the parade" if and when it's deployed to Syria.

    Even before this month's Tomahawk missile strikes, the shift in the threat landscape was already becoming clear.

    "We think the only thing that can operate in and through that environment is going to be fifth generation," Harris told reporters after the March Senate hearing.

    F-22s are currently flying in Syria, where they flew their first-ever combat missions in 2014 as the U.S. began hitting Islamic State targets. The Pentagon wouldn't say if the recent attacks on the Assad regime moved up the timeline for deploying the F-35 to the Middle East, but a spokesperson for Air Combat Command said that commanders could request the stealth fighter if it met their needs. The Air Force deployed the F-35A to the U.K. earlier this month for NATO exercises.

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    Balancing Stealth Vs. Firepower
    Maintaining a military edge comes at a cost. The Trump administration has vowed to boost Pentagon spending but is also scrutinizing individual programs.

    Earlier this year, Defense Secretary James Mattis ordered a review of the F-35's costs as well as options for upgrading F/A-18 Super Hornets. The basic F-35A model costs about $95 million each under the latest production contract, but versions for the Navy and Marines are more expensive. The current Super Hornet version costs $52 million to $61 million, depending on the model.

    By the time F-22 production ended, the per-plane cost was about $140 million, though total procurement topped $60 billion to get 187 planes in operation. Advocates periodically have called for making more, even though Lockheed has shut down the production line. A 2011 RAND study put the cost of building 75 more F-22s at $13.7 billion to $17.4 billion in 2008 dollars. The Air Force has maintained that a restart would be too expensive and would take away resources from the F-35 and other programs.

    To be sure, fifth-generation fighters aren't invincible — and aren't invisible.

    "Even fifth generation would be challenged to penetrate in certain ranges against these very capable air-missile-defense systems," said Mark Gunzinger, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments and a retired Air Force colonel, noting China has developed its own "very advanced" HQ-9 air-defense system.

    But he said the S-400 wouldn't create "no-go zones" for the U.S. and allies.

    And a trade-off of stealth fighters is that maintaining a low-observable radar profile means they can't carry as many missiles and bombs under their wings. As a result, fourth-generation fighters can bring more firepower, and there are ways to reduce their detectability too.

    Boeing has proposed a stealthier version of the Super Hornet, which would have a special radar-evading coating and wouldn't have fuel tanks under the wings, Dan Gillian, Boeing's F/A-18 and EA-18 program manager, said at an industry conference earlier this month.

    He added that the advanced Super Hornet would be "complementary" to the F-35 with its long-range infrared search-and-track system and deeper magazine that holds more munitions than the Navy's F-35C variant can.

    The F-35 As 'Quarterback'
    Fourth-generation fighters won't be obsolete and should continue playing a key role in combat as part of a one-two punch with their stealthier counterparts.

    Lockheed's website describes the F-35 as the "quarterback" of a joint strike force that can "share what it sees with other aircraft to expand situational awareness across the entire network of aircraft."

    Also, pitting a plane against an air-defense system or other threat in a head-to-head competition is the "wrong way to think," said Gunzinger.

    Instead, the focus should be on how fifth- and fourth-generation fighters — along with jamming aircraft like Boeing's EA-18G Growler, cyber operations and unmanned systems — can work together to take down a threat, he added.

    "It's a family of systems," said the Air Force's Harris. "It's going to be our fifth generation that goes into a threat environment like that and kick down the door. And then maybe after those threats have been suppressed, allow fourth generation back into the fight."
     
  12. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    News
    Lockheed F-35s Doing 'Exceedingly Well' In South Korea As North Threatens

    Trump: We Cut Approximately $600 Million From F-35


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    Lockheed Martin's (LMT) F-35s are "doing exceedingly well" in U.S.-South Korea military drills, according to a top aviation Marine, as the advanced stealth fighter raises its profile amid increasing threats from North Korea.

    Seven or eight Marine F-35B variants out of the 10 sent to South Korea earlier this month flew on a daily basis, said Lt. Gen. Jon Davis, the Marine Corps' deputy commandant for aviation, at a House Armed Forces subcommittee hearing late Tuesday.

    That level of readiness is better than what is seen from the service's Boeing (BA) F/A-18s, he added.

    "The F-35 are doing exceedingly well," Davis said. "They are in Korea right now. The first forward deployed."

    In January, the Marine Corps sent its first squadron of F-35s to Iwakuni, Japan, after the fighters were declared ready for combat in July 2015.

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    Lockheed shares dipped 0.3% to close at 268.24 on the stock market today. Boeing finished up 0.15%.

    The Korea Herald reported over the weekend that the F-35s practiced precision bombings as part of an annual joint training exercise between South Korea and the U.S.

    The flights come as North Korea becomes increasingly aggressive with its missile and nuclear tests, while U.S. officials have suggested the F-35 has deterrence value against adversaries.

    Last year, the Air Force said the F-35 could be deployed to Europe and the Pacific without notice as a show of force.

    The F-35's performance could also reassure South Korea's government as it has committed to buying 40 F-35A jets with initial deliveries beginning in 2018.

    Meanwhile, the Marine Corps is eager to get more F-35s as soon as possible, if not sooner. The Marines are expected to buy 340 F-35B models and 80 F-35C versions.

    The Marines could save $1 billion in operations and maintenance costs if they got rid of their legacy F/A-18s sooner than the target date of 2030 and replaced them with F-35s, Davis said.

    "My No. 1 risk is a slower ramp than I've got now and that I've got to fly legacy airplanes longer, in particular the F-18," he told reporters after the hearing Tuesday. "It's been a great airplane. ... I've got a high degree of confidence in it, but it's time to move on."
     
  13. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    TEXAS SPEEDING TICKET –
    IS THIS GREAT? OR WHAT!

    TOP THIS ONE FOR A SPEEDING TICKET IN KINGSVILLE, TEXAS

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    Two Texas Highway Patrol Officers were conducting speeding enforcement on Highway 77, just south of Kingsville, Texas.
    One of the officers was using a hand-held radar device to check speeding vehicles approaching the town of Kingsville.
    The officers were suddenly surprised when the radar gun began reading 300 miles per hour and climbing.
    The officer attempted to reset the radar gun, but it would not reset and then it suddenly turned off.
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    Just then a deafening roar over the mesquite tree tops on Highway 77 revealed that the radar had in fact, locked on to a USMC F35 which was engaged in a low-flying exercise near its Naval Air home base location in Kingsville.

    Back at the Texas Highway Patrol Headquarters in Corpus Christi the Patrol Captain fired off a complaint to the U. S. Naval Base Commander in Kingsville for shutting down his equipment.

    The reply came back in true USMC style:
    "Thank you for your letter . . .
    "You may be interested to know that the tactical computer in the F35 had detected the presence of, and subsequently locked on to, your hostile radar equipment and automatically sent a jamming signal back to it, which is why it shut down."

    "Furthermore, an air-to-ground missile aboard the fully armed aircraft had also automatically locked on to your equipment's location."

    "Fortunately, the marine pilot flying theF35 recognized the situation for what it was, quickly responded to the missile system alert status and was able to override the automated defense system before the missile was launched to destroy the hostile radar position on the side of Highway 77, south of Kingsville."

    "The pilot suggests you cover your mouths when swearing at them, since the video systems on these jets are very high tech."
    "Sergeant Johnson, the officer holding the radar gun, should get his dentist to check his left molar. It appears the filling is loose.
    Also, the snap is broken on his holster."
    Semper Fi.
     
  14. Picdelamirand-oil

    Picdelamirand-oil Lt. Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    if true it prove that a simple car hand-held radar device can detect a F-35.
     
  15. Gessler

    Gessler Mod MODERATOR

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    ...and those Police radars are super-short wavelengths (Ka-band). Maybe even MMW.
     

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