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F-INSAS : Indias Future Infantry Soldier Project

Discussion in 'Indian Army' started by Manmohan Yadav, Sep 11, 2011.

  1. Abingdonboy

    Abingdonboy Captain Technical Analyst

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  2. Gessler

    Gessler Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Nice vid! First real look inside MKU's production facilities I had.

    Confirms a lot of things we already knew - however I'm as of yet uncertain whether the ACH-2000 model we're getting for the infantry will have a Bolt-Free shell or not. ACH helmets usually have ballistic bolts which, when hit, are designed to break up into two large pieces (bolt head remains outside/falls off and the shaft remains inside the shell), and not necessarily fragment into several dangerous pieces. However I'm not sure if this practice is followed by all makers of the ACH type or only a few. Either way, an entirely bolt-free shell is better any day of the week. With a system like MACS in place, bolts are unnecessary (although I still question myself why other manufacturers are not following this idea?).

    Also, it seems the base design will remain ACH-2000, and while the regular infantry get a no-frills version, the CO of each unit is given an integrated communication system + side-rails and NV mount. Not exactly how I'd want it to be but it's a start. Note that he said there will be PROVISION for mounting flashlights/cams (i.e. rails will be there), but the actual equipment itself isn't ordered yet. Makes sense I guess - no need to hold up the critical helmet requirement for sake of components that can be easily integrated down the line.

    Another nice tidbit is the MKU rep's statement that a newer helmet based on the ECH design is in the works. Biggest change in the ECH is probably the use of thermoplastics in place of ballistic fiber, leading to much-improved protection levels even against rifle-caliber rounds. Hope Army adopts the MKU ECH when it appears. Physical appearance & dimensions-wise, it should be no different to the ACH so that's a plus.

    Only thing is that I hope both MKU & Army paid close attention to the sizes of the helmets they procure - hope they obtained an average based on measurements of several soldiers' heads - and that helmets of several sizes are available outright.
     
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  3. Abingdonboy

    Abingdonboy Captain Technical Analyst

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    Right but would imagine that all SF operators would get the fully spec'd up versions from the outset.
     
  4. Vergennes

    Vergennes Strategist Staff Member MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    @Gessler @Abingdonboy

    Is this the new Indian army helmet ? Pictures are from a recent exercise between the Chinese and Indian armies. I've never seen this model before.

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  5. Gessler

    Gessler Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Yes, only some units have adopted it so far (based on ACH-2000 design).

    These pictures were on the internet for a while - you can go to Page 10 of this thread from where onward I did a series of posts explaining what I think IA infantry should be like in the future, and how it's going to be - I think on Page 11 or something I also covered this pics.
     
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  6. LonewolfSandeep

    LonewolfSandeep 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    I believe it is helmets from Kanpur-based company MKU Industries has been contracted by the Indian Army and asked to manufacture a total of 1.58 lakh military helmets recently. on closer inspection can see its distant ear side slight elevation, with 2 screw spots on each side, to support add on integrated support.
    The helmets pic below with Integrated Support to Wearable Systems, for special or future operations, minus rubber padding in corners to holdin camouflage cloth covering on helmet.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. SR-91

    SR-91 FULL MEMBER

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    COIMBATORE: From the mountainous terrains of the sensitive northeastern border to the Kutch desert bordering Pakistan, Indian soldiers keep us safe while trying their best to stay alive. Camouflage clothing play a big part in protecting both personnel and equipment from observation by enemy forces. How about a combat uniform that can change colours like a chameleon, depending on the terrain the soldier is in? Well, that could soon be a reality, thanks to a city-based scientist.

    "If they move to a desert, the garment will slowly start changing its colour. The light and dark green will turn into yellow when the temperature crosses 55°C. Once the soldiers return to the plains, the light and dark green colour will return. This will help battalions that have to immediately move to new terrains and will save cost for the defence ministry," says Amitava Bhattacharya, a scientist with the Coimbatore-based PSG Institute of Advanced Studies.

    Having pursued his PhD in developing camouflages for defence purposes, Amitava is a winner of the 3rd National Award for Technology Innovation for the year 2012-13, announced by the ministry of chemicals and fertilizers, under the category of research in the field of polymer science and technology. He has developed two types of camouflage materials that are now under consideration for mass production by the Defence Research and Development Organisation(DRDO). While one can be used for making textiles, the other can be used to cover objects and structures.

    "This is called chameleon camouflaging," Amitava says. "There are three types of camouflaging - visual, infrared and radar. My work includes all the three areas. The first product that I have developed is a textile made of nanocomposite materials. That is a flexible product, that can be bent and folded. It is dyed with a mix of four colours - black, yellow, light and dark green. The dyes are a mix of natural and synthetic materials," he told TOI.

    The material for hiding structures and objects is a rigid material. "It has coatings on both sides. On the top, it is coated with paints made of nanocomposite materials. These will change colours depending on the temperature. The other side of the component is made of radar absorbent materials (RAM). These materials have the property of absorbing the infrared radiation and converting it into thermal energy. The minimum requirement set by the defence ministry is 95% absorption, 99% is considered ideal. The material I developed can absorb IR up to 16GHz frequency. It can be used to cover small buildings, guns, tanks and artilleries. There are many RAM available in the market, but I have developed my own composition," says Amitava.

    PSG is currently funding his research. "At present DRDO has given green signal for the work. I am also designing the plan to scale up production," he says.

    The technology has many civilian applications also. "Think about a tie that changes colour from green to yellow as you step out of the air-conditioned office. Or a sari that shows off a different hue the moment you enter a wedding hall. The possibilities are endless," he adds.

    57442002.jpg
     
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