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F22 analysis expanded

Discussion in 'The Americas' started by Picard, Apr 13, 2012.

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  1. Death.By.Chocolate

    Death.By.Chocolate 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    What do you mean by LPI radar is "invisible"? Invisible to what?
     
  2. Picard

    Picard Lt. Colonel RESEARCHER

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    "Invisible", as in, "undetectable by RWR". It is colloquial usage, same as "invisible aircraft" for stealth aircraft, which is why I have put it into quotation marks.
     
  3. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Avionics

    The F-22's avionics include BAE Systems E&IS radar warning receiver (RWR) AN/ALR-94,[151] AN/AAR 56 Infra-Red and Ultra-Violet MAWS (Missile Approach Warning System) and the Northrop Grumman AN/APG-77 Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar. The AN/ALR-94 is a passive receiver system to detect radar signals; composed of more than 30 antennas blended into the wings and fuselage that provide all around coverage. It was described by Tom Burbage, former F-22 program head at Lockheed Martin, as "the most technically complex piece of equipment on the aircraft." It has a greater range (250+ nmi) than the radar, allowing the F-22 to limit its own radar emissions to maximise stealth. As a target approaches, the receiver can cue the AN/APG-77 radar to track the target with a narrow beam, which can be as focused down to 2° by 2° in azimuth and elevation.[152]





    The AN/APG-77 AESA radar
    The AN/APG-77 radar, designed for air superiority and strike operations, features a low-observable, active-aperture, electronically-scanned array that can track multiple targets in any weather. The AN/APG-77 changes frequencies more than 1,000 times per second to lower interception probability. Additionally, radar emissions can be focused in an electronic-attack capability to overload enemy sensors.[153][154]
    The radar's information is processed by two Raytheon Common Integrated Processor (CIP)s. Each CIP can process 10.5 billion instructions per second and has 300 megabytes of memory. Information can be gathered from the radar and other onboard and offboard systems, filtered by the CIP, and offered in easy-to-digest ways on several cockpit displays, enabling the pilot to remain on top of complicated situations. The F-22s avionics software has some 1.7 million lines of code, the majority involving processing data from the radar.[155] The radar has an estimated range of 125–150 miles, though planned upgrades will allow a range of 250 miles (400 km) or more in narrow beams.[149] In 2007, tests by Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, and L-3 Communications enabled the AESA system of a Raptor to act like a WiFi access point, able to transmit data at 548 megabits per second and receive at gigabit speed; this is far faster than the Link 16 system used by U.S. and allied aircraft, which transfers data at just over 1 Mbit/s.[156]

    The F-22 has a threat detection and identification capability comparative with the RC-135 Rivet Joint.[149] The F-22's stealth allows it to safely operate far closer to the battlefield, compensating for the reduced capability.[149] The F-22 is capable of functioning as a "mini-AWACS", however the radar is less powerful than dedicated platforms such as the E-3 Sentry.[142] The F-22 allows its pilot to designate targets for cooperating F-15s and F-16s, and determine whether two friendly aircraft are targeting the same aircraft.[142][149] This radar system can sometimes identify targets "many times quicker than the AWACS".[149] The radar is capable of high-bandwidth data transmission; conventional radio "chatter" can be reduced via these alternative means.[149] The IEEE-1394B data bus developed for the F-22 was derived from the commercial IEEE-1394 "FireWire" bus system.[157] Sensor fusion combines data from all onboard and offboard sensors into a common view to prevent the pilot from being overwhelmed.[158]

    In a critical article former Navy Secretary John Lehman wrote "[a]t least [the F-22s] are safe from cyberattack. No one in China knows how to program the '83 vintage IBM software that runs them."[159] Former Secretary of the USAF Michael Wynne blamed the use of the DoD's Ada as a reason for cost overruns and schedule slippages on many major military projects, including the F-22 Raptor.[160] The F-22 uses the INTEGRITY-178B operating system from Green Hills Software, which is also used on the F-35, several commercial airliners and the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle.[161]

    Herbert J. Carlisle has said that the F-22 can datalink with the Tomahawk (missile).[162

    In testing, a Raptor dropped a 1,000 lb (450 kg) JDAM from 50,000 feet (15,000 m), while cruising at Mach 1.5, striking a moving target 24 miles (39 km) away.

    The Raptor's very high sustained cruise speed and operational altitude add significantly to the effective range of both air-to-air and air-to-surface munitions. This gives it a 40% greater employment range for air to air missiles than the F-35.[175] The USAF plans to procure the AIM-120D AMRAAM, reported to have a 50% increase in range compared to the AIM-120C.


    Its my understanding that the range of an AIM 120C is a hundred miles,, if the above is true then the F22 is going to be able to reach out 150 miles. Check it out and see if I am wrong on my figures. Thats 241 KM
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2012
  4. Picard

    Picard Lt. Colonel RESEARCHER

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    And if enemy doesn't radiate, all that is irrelevant.
     
  5. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Even you are not that stupid to believe radar that can reach out 250 miles and missiles that can reach out 150 miles does not matter.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2012
  6. Picard

    Picard Lt. Colonel RESEARCHER

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    Face it, noone smart will radiate in real war. F22s radar is quite visible.
     
  7. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    So what according to you BVR does not work so enemy planes will have to get within 2 miles of the F22 to shoot it down.
     
  8. Picard

    Picard Lt. Colonel RESEARCHER

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    Yes. Opposite is also true, though.
     
  9. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Right maybe they will use bows and arrows.
     
  10. Picard

    Picard Lt. Colonel RESEARCHER

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    Maybe they'll fire you from that bow...
     
  11. Picdelamirand-oil

    Picdelamirand-oil Lt. Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    Stealth Fighter Jet Chokes Yet Another Pilot | Danger Room | Wired.com

    The Air Force swears it’s working like mad to figure out why its premiere stealth fighter, the F-22 Raptor, is choking its pilots. They better: Just on Friday, another Raptor pilot experienced shortness of breath while flying his aircraft over Hawaii.

    Luckily, he landed safely. But the hypoxia mystery — which the Air Force plans to spend much of the year inspecting — continues: This was the 23rd unexplained “hypoxic incident” since the Raptor was introduced in 2005.
     
  12. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Notice the differance in USA and Russia, in democracy ever incident is public and in the papers, congress is involved, but in a country like Russia, or China the problems are hidden and covered up and often never solved. Have your ever given thought there might be some hidden, but knowen reasons for all the mig crashs, or that some 1500 mig 25 and mig 31 or 10000 Russian Air to Air Missiles have never shot down an enemy plane. Its just an idea thats floating around out there.
     
  13. Picdelamirand-oil

    Picdelamirand-oil Lt. Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    If the efficiency of Russia weapons is so bad, why do you need stealth aircrafts? to counter the French ones?
     
  14. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    In the future you will never know where the weapons might be from, and in a fight its allways a good idea have and edge and the bigger edge the better. In the era of the smart bomb air superiority will rule any battle field.
     
  15. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

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    only thing stealthy so far about F-22 has been the reasons for its crashes.
     
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