Future Main Battle Tank Of Indian Army - News & Discussions

Discussion in 'Indian Army' started by BlueOval, Aug 10, 2010.

  1. BlueOval
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    BlueOval Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    DRDO to develop army's next-generation tank

    With most of our armour unfit to fight at night, the project is crucial.

    In March this year, during trials in the Rajasthan desert, the Defence R&D Organisation’s Arjun tank conclusively outperformed the Russian T-90, the army’s showpiece. Buoyed by that success and by the army’s consequent order for 124 additional Arjuns, the DRDO is now readying to develop India’s next-generation tank, currently termed the Future Main Battle Tank (FMBT).

    While costs are still being evaluated, the projections are mind-boggling. The development cost alone could be Rs 5,000 crore. Then, the replacement cost of the Indian Army’s 4,000 tanks — at a conservative Rs 25 crore per FMBT — adds to Rs 1,00,000 crore. The bulk of this would flow, over years of production, to Tier-I and Tier-II suppliers from small and medium industries.

    For the first time, the DRDO has outlined the FMBT project’s contours. Talking exclusively to Business Standard, DRDO chief and Scientific Advisor to the Defence Minister, V K Saraswat, revealed, “While the Future Infantry Combat Vehicle (FICV) has been handed over to private industry, the DRDO will develop the FMBT. We need about seven-eight years from the time the project is formally sanctioned. The army and the DRDO have already identified the major features of the FMBT, which are quite different from the Arjun. While the Arjun is a 60-tonne tank, the FMBT will be lighter… about 50 tonnes. It will be a highly mobile tank.”

    Vital project

    The FMBT project, says the military, is crucial for India’s future battle readiness. As army chief, General Deepak Kapoor pronounced 80 per cent of India’s tank fleet unfit to fight at night, which is when most tank battles take place. The bulk of our fleet, some 2,400 obsolescent Russian T-72s, are being shoddily patched up (see Business Standard, Feb 3, ‘Army to spend billions on outdated T-72 tanks’). More modern T-90 tanks were procured from Russia in 2001, shorn of crucial systems to reduce prices, after parliamentary dissent threatened to derail the contract (Business Standard, Feb 4, ‘Piercing the army’s armour of deception’). Only now, after nine years of stonewalling, has Russia transferred the technology needed to build the T-90 in India.

    Urgently in need of capable tanks, the army has worked with DRDO to finalise a broad range of capabilities for the FMBT. These have been formalised in a document called the Preliminary Specifications Qualitative Requirement (PSQR). The detailed specifications of the FMBT, once finalised, will be listed in General Staff Qualitative Requirements (GSQR).

    Amongst the capabilities being finalised for the GSQR are: active armour, which will shoot down enemy anti-tank projectiles before they strike the FMBT; extreme mobility, which makes the FMBT much harder to hit; the capability to operate in a nuclear-contaminated battlefield without exposing the crew to radiation; and the networked flow of information to the FMBT, providing full situational awareness to the crew, even when “buttoned down” inside the tank.

    Also being finalised is the FMBT armament, a key attribute that determines a tank’s battlefield influence. The Arjun already has a heavy 120mm ‘main gun’, and two small-calibre machine guns; the recently ordered batch of 124 Arjuns will also fire anti-tank missiles through their main gun. The army wants all of those for the FMBT, with ranges enhanced through technological improvements.

    However, the DRDO chief ruled out an electromagnetic gun, the next generation in high-velocity guns towards which armament technology aspires. “The Future MBT is not so far in the future,” Saraswat quipped.

    FICV, too

    With the FMBT project squarely on its agenda, the DRDO also envisages a major role in developing the FICV. Says the DRDO chief, “The FICV is not just a conventional armoured vehicle for transporting soldiers. It involves advanced technologies and multidisciplinary integration, which private industry has never done. Only the DRDO and the Ordnance Factory Board (OFB) have that experience. DRDO teams are already thinking about the technologies that should go into the FICV. But this is only to support private industry in making the FICV project a success.”

    While private industry weighs its options about where to manufacture the FICV, the DRDO has already chosen the Heavy Vehicle Factory (HVF) in Avadi —- the OFB facility that builds the Arjun —- as the FMBT production line.

    “It will definitely be produced in HVF. I see no way that we can go away from HVF,” says Saraswat. “The HVF will work with us from the preliminary design of the FMBT, so that we can go from prototype to mass production without any hiccups.”

    DRDO to develop army's next-generation tank

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. True_Indian
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    True_Indian 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    What about stealth ?
     
  3. RoYaN
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    RoYaN Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Oh God!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Its a tank and not the T-50 for their to be stealth.

    What about the Armour and most importantly ENGINE
     
  4. JAISWAL
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    JAISWAL FULL MEMBER

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    They must work to provide gas turbine engine 4 good power and agility. and we know a engine which might fit in.
     
  5. True_Indian
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    True_Indian 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Pardon my ignorance..
    wont stealth come handy against awac and other radars ?
     
  6. flanker143
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    flanker143 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    The Hindu : Front Page : 1,500-horsepower FMBT to replace T-72 tanks beyond 2020

    CHENNAI: The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) is working on India's future main battle tank (FMBT) with a 1,500-horsepower (HP) indigenous engine. This tank will replace beyond 2020 the imported T-72 tanks, renamed Ajeya, with the Army. Various specifications for the FMBT have been finalised.

    “For engine development, we have formed a national team comprising members from the academia, the user, industry and the DRDO. We have also gone in for an international consultant,†said S. Sundaresh, Chief Controller (Armaments and Combat Engineering), DRDO.

    The first prototype of the indigenous engine would be ready in four to five years.

    The DRDO is launching a project to develop the transmission for the tank; the indigenous engine and transmission will together be called Bharat Power Pack and it will meet the FMBT's mobility requirements.

    “We are confident that we will be ready with the FMBT prototype in five to seven years,†Mr. Sundaresh said.

    “We are trying to involve all the stakeholders — the user [the Army], quality control personnel and the production agency — in this project and the industry will be our partner. We will go for a modular design so that we can always upgrade the tank when new technology comes in,†he said.

    The FMBT will weigh only 50 tonnes compared to Arjun-Mark II's 62 tonnes. The DRDO is simultaneously working on Arjun-Mark II. The volume occupied by the electronics package in the FMBT will be less. The FMBT's engine will be two-thirds the size of Arjun-Mark I's, but will generate 1,500 HP compared to Arjun-Mark I's 1,400 HP.

    Improved technologies

    Improvements in material, fuel injection and filtration technologies will contribute to the reduction in the engine size without compromising on power.

    “The immediate task for the CVRDE [Combat Vehicles Research and Development Establishment] is to develop the Arjun-Mk II tank and demonstrate it to the user and go for the production of 124 numbers in the HVF (Heavy Vehicles Factory],†Mr. Sundaresh said. The CVRDE and the HVF are situated in Avadi, near Chennai.

    The Arjun-Mk II tank will have a number of upgrades compared with Arjun-Mk I. Missiles can be fired from the former to destroy long-range targets and bring down attack helicopters. The tank's commander will have a panoramic sight with night vision.

    “With this upgrade, the commander can carry out his hunting job at night with his thermal sight and engage targets more effectively,†Mr. Sundaresh explained.

    Another upgrade will see the introduction of an explosive reactive armour panel which will comprise explosives in metallic brick form. These bricks will be mounted not only on the front slope of Arjun-Mk-II tank, but all round it as well.

    When the enemy ammunition hits these bricks, they will explode and retard the energy of the projectile, which then cannot penetrate the tank's armour.

    PHOTO: K: PICHUMANI

    The main battle tank Arjun Mark I at the CVRDE in Avadi, Chennai.
    “The penalty for using these bricks is that they will add 1.5 tonnes to the tank's weight. But we can prevent top attack and side attack. We can add to the tank's protection from missiles and rocket-propelled grenades,†the DRDO Chief Controller said.

    Automatic target tracking

    The fourth upgrade is that Arjun Mk-II will have an automatic target tracking system which will add to the accuracy when firing on a moving target.

    P. Sivakumar, CVRDE Director, said Arjun-Mk-II would have a total of 93 upgrades, including the advanced air defence gun system for firing at attack helicopters. The Army had placed an indent for production of 124 Arjun-Mk II tanks.

    In phase I, 45 tanks will roll out with 56 upgrades, including the missile firing capability and the commander's panoramic sight with night vision.

    In phase II, the remaining 79 tanks, with all the 93 improvements, will come off the assembly line. “By 2013-14, the first batch of around 30 tanks will go out,†Dr. Sivakumar said
    .

    According to Mr. Sundaresh, these 124 Arjun-Mk II tanks would cost Rs.5,000 crores.





    oodles of good info about indian tank development !!!!!
     
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  7. flanker143
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    flanker143 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    some questions...??

    wasn't the arjun mk2 weigh 5 tns less than mk1.....??

    is this a good or bad thing ...??

    this is a little confusing .... does this mean that mk1 cannot fire lahat .....??or also lahat can shoot down attack helicopter...??
     
  8. jagjitnatt
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    jagjitnatt Major ELITE MEMBER

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    I don't think Arjun would weigh any less than 60 tons.
    A heavy tank is always a good thing in the battlefield. You just need an engine powerful enough to provide enough mobility. Lighter tanks are economical, easy to use, but vulnerable to attack.
    [/quote]
    Mk I can not fire missiles. LAHAT was tested on Arjun on a prototype. The capability was proven but later dropped due to some problems.
     
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  9. flanker143
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    flanker143 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    @jagjitnatt sir...
    thanks for the previous post sir....

    what i meant i ask for this one was that --- whether a reduced volume of electronics package will result in a limited capability or it will have the same or eve more capability with (the smaller ) given electronics package even with the reduced volume of electronic package......just like new indian powerpack under development.......

    also sir i wanted to ask that is that (acc to you ) what are the problems/glitches or areas in which in arjun lacks......
    due to which army is so reluctant to induct arjun (bcoz i feel that even 248 is a not so great no.) and also the new requirement of fmbt shows that it doesn't want arjun even in the future......or i should say that arjun mk2 will have the same fate as of mk1....
     
  10. jagjitnatt
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    jagjitnatt Major ELITE MEMBER

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    Reduced volume of electronics doesn't mean less performance. It means that the newer electronics would be fabricated at a smaller process which is good because it is cheaper to produce, takes up less space, emits lesser heat so size of heatsink required is reduced, and requires less power to operate, not to mention performs faster.

    Arjun has its shares of problems, biggest is the turret. It is not the best in the class. It is a rifled gun which will increase its range and accuracy. But rifled gun needs to be replaced every 400 or so shots. Secondly the stabilization is not the best in class. Arjun can fire accurately when moving at slow speeds, but not at fast speeds.

    There are other problems too regarding its mobility and survivability. But they have been fixed in the Next batch of 124 tanks ordered.
     
  11. flanker143
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    flanker143 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    so the turret problem will persist in mk2 version.....thats not good....

    so arjun cannot fire on fast moves but can the t 90 ??
    here is an article which left me with not so great views about our bhishma.....also i seriously feel that everything is not ok with the procurement of t 90.... anywaz how many further no.s can we expect from army for mk2
     
  12. THE_MAGNIFICENT
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    THE_MAGNIFICENT 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Yeah i also read this article of ajay shukla. felt bad how indian army purchased downgraded version of T90.

    Do arjun have any self defence system ? or will it have in mark II version. if it have how efficient it is .
     
  13. Naren1987
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    Naren1987 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    What will the power to weight ratio for a tank powered by this engine?
     
  14. THE_MAGNIFICENT
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    THE_MAGNIFICENT 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Easy to calculate bro. All info is already given.

    weight = 50 Tonne

    Power = 1500 BHp

    Calculation

    power = 1500 horsepower
    weight = 50 ton metric

    power to weight ratio = power / weight = 1500 / 50 = 30

    So power to weight ratio will be 30 hp/tonne Arjun's p to w ratio is 23.9 hp/tonne
     
  15. jagjitnatt
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    jagjitnatt Major ELITE MEMBER

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    Its true that our T90s aren't the best T90s out there. But T90s in general are pretty good. They are better than what Pakistan or China field. Arjun Mk II would be better than Mk I but still nowhere near the T90 overall.

    So its T90S > Arjun Mk II> Arjun Mk I > T72

    I expect some 200-300 Mk II Arjuns.
     

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