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Future Main Battle Tank Of Indian Army - News & Discussions

Discussion in 'Indian Army' started by BlueOval, Aug 10, 2010.

  1. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

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  2. ColdPlay

    ColdPlay Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Wish Arjun Mk2 had Trophy APS.
     
  3. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

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    It should have it by the time induction happens.
     
  4. CountryFirst2

    CountryFirst2 Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    Is that Indian??
     
  5. Vyom

    Vyom Captain IDF NewBie

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    WHy are you so adamant the every thing should have to be Indian... evem if it means that we have to fight with sticks.. ?? Even the Engine that will power Arjun MK2 is supposedly German.

    almost all electronics that we used in India are manufactured in china(domestic and civil teletom) or Israel/US/UK/France(Military Electronics) or Thailand (Memeory devices).

    Even your PC or Phone ... Hardly has a single component that is 'Made in India'. Its not because of any conspiracy but the socialist approach of governance.
     
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  6. CountryFirst2

    CountryFirst2 Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    They're not excuses to support buying foreign, instead they themselves are mistakes that have to be corrected immediately.
    Defence equipment especially above everythign else should be made in India itself and also designed in India also, for strategic reasons.

    Nation faces major cyber threat from imported defence systems, DRDO Chief | idrw.org
     
  7. Vyom

    Vyom Captain IDF NewBie

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    foolish assumptions, so what are we supposed to do ?? Our Industry is just does not have the Technology or the prodution capacity to produce current state of the art weapons and what ever they are capable of producing is just not standard enough for the rest of the world or what China Produces.

    We need to correct our mistakes... fine... How are we supposed to do that immediately ?? By a magic wand ?

    Developing and establishing cutting edge weapons manufacturing takes substantial time and even if we were to begin today it will not be possible till the entire industry behavior and tech gets a major over haul. Most of our industries are Soviet era, the modern ones have just propped up about 10-12 years ago and the national manufacturing capacity is just not enough to match that out of China.

    So in the meanwhile, when our industry is maturing slowly, in the time being even we have the money to buy good 'foreign' arms, your suggestion is we should arm our Jawans with unreliable arms, under performing arms because of the sake that it is 'domestic'.

    I am not in favor of buying foreign arms perpetually, but for time being that our defence industry makes up the gap to the international standards we will have to buy 'foreign'. Even if national security with B grade arms seems like Patriotic it is indeed asinine. And National security is not and never an excuse.
     
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  8. CountryFirst2

    CountryFirst2 Lieutenant SENIOR MEMBER

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    What's the point of buying foreign weapons when we can't count on them?? Refer how Saddam Hussains missiles didn't work against the USA.

    Buying foreign weapons is worse than not having any weapons, because they can also be used for espionage, misinformation, tampering, spying and what not.

    I didn't say we make it overnight, what I meant is we should not buy from the west (and I mean NATO nations). Anyone else is okey for immediate basic security. And that is why I said if we can't make it ourselves, then atleast buy from trust worthy nations like Russians. Atleast they won't tamper with things.

    I would rather fight with a non-sophisticated weapon that I can count on than a sophisticated weapon which is unreliable.
     
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  9. Vyom

    Vyom Captain IDF NewBie

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    FYI Saddam had Scud Missiles in his primary armory, developed by the Soviet Union during the Cold War. So they were NOT NATO weapons.

    Russian are thieves in disguise, they weapons have no strings attached but the rip us off on the money front ask vstol jockey if you find me wrong in your perception. France is hell of a lot better as a weapon supplier, they supplied us with weapons even when the world sanctioned us after 1998 Pokhran Tests.

    West knew, and has always known about our weapons in the past and their surveillance and spy technology is light years ahead of all else. We will not be immune to them, until we achieve full in-house weapon manufacturing and production capacity, it will not happen overnight.

    You need to come into the reality, form where ever you are. I am not wasting a word on this any more.. no off topic discussion any more and never to correct your stance as you only assume what is convenient to you. Enough of conspiracy theories.
     
  10. shah86

    shah86 FULL MEMBER

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    courtesy @livefist
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2014
  11. Gessler

    Gessler BANNED BANNED

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    L&T-built MLC-70 standard bridge for armored vehicles -

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    Thanks to Kunal Biswas for the 2nd and 3rd images.
     
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  12. Indian Jatt

    Indian Jatt Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    look at those people they wont dare to stand on that tank if it was on the battlefield, instead they would had run for the shelter, u know people must start respecting the armed forces otherwise that day is not very distant that we will be standing in front of them..........civil war people....
     
  13. INDIAN NATIONALIST

    INDIAN NATIONALIST Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    i like the camo

    looks like its made of legos
     
  14. INDIAN NATIONALIST

    INDIAN NATIONALIST Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    in reference to what countryfirst2 posted regarding sabotaged / bugged military hardware from foreigners:

    Something wrong with our **** chips today

    Kill switches are changing the conduct and politics of war
    Apr 7th 2011

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    IN THE 1991 Gulf war Iraq's armed forces used American-made colour photocopiers to produce their battle plans. That was a mistake. The circuitry in some of them contained concealed transmitters that revealed their position to American electronic-warfare aircraft, making bomb and missile strikes more precise. The operation, described by David Lindahl, a specialist at the Swedish Defence Research Agency, a government think-tank, highlights a secret front in high-tech warfare: turning enemy assets into liabilities.


    The internet and the growing complexity of electronic circuitry have made it much easier to install what are known as “kill switches” and “back doors”, which may disable, betray or blow up the devices in which they are installed. Chips can easily contain 2 billion transistors, leaving plenty of scope to design a few that operate secretly. Testing even a handful of them for anomalies requires weeks of work.


    Kill switches and other remote controls are on the minds of Western governments pondering whether to send weapons such as sophisticated anti-tank missiles, normally tightly policed, to rebels in Libya. Keeping tabs on when and where they are fired will allay fears that they could end up in terrorist hands. Such efforts would not even need to be kept secret. A former CIA official says the rebels could be told: “Look, we're going to give you this, but we want to be able to control it.”

    That lesson was first learned in Afghanistan in the 1980s, when America supplied Stinger missiles to help Afghan fighters against Soviet helicopter gunships, only to have to comb the region's arms bazaars in later years to buy them back (some were then booby-trapped and sold again, to deter anyone tempted to use them).


    America worries about becoming the victim of kill switches itself. Six years ago a report by America's Defence Science Board, an official advisory body, said “unauthorised design inclusions” in foreign-made chips could help an outside power gain a measure of control over critical American hardware.


    Chips off the home block


    In response, America has launched schemes such as the Trusted Foundry Programme, which certifies “secure, domestic” facilities for the manufacture of the most critical microchips. The Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), a Pentagon outfit devoted to expanding the military's technological abilities, will spend at least $20m this year on ways to identify rogue microchips. The Army Research Office is holding a closed conference on kill switches in mid-April.


    Farinaz Koushanfar, a DARPA-funded expert at Texas's Rice University, says microchip designers would like to be able to switch off their products “in the wild”, in case the contractors that make the chips produce some extra ones to sell on the sly. She designs “active hardware metering” chips that, in devices connected to the internet, can remotely identify them and if necessary switch them off.


    An obvious countermeasure is to keep critical defence equipment off the net. But that is only a partial solution. Chips can be designed to break down at a certain date. An innocent-looking component or even a bit of soldering can be a disguised antenna. When it receives the right radio signal, from, say, a mobile-phone network, aircraft or satellite, the device may blow up, shut down, or work differently.


    Old-fashioned spying can reveal technological weaknesses too. Mr Lindahl says Sweden obtained detailed information on circuitry in a heat-seeking missile that at least one potential adversary might, in wartime, shoot at one of its eight C-130 Hercules military-transport planes. A slight but precise change in the ejection tempo of the decoy flares would direct those missiles towards the flame, not the aircraft.


    Such tricks may be handy in dealing with unreliable allies as well as foes, but they can also hamper Western efforts to contain risk in unstable countries. Pakistan has blocked American efforts to safeguard its nuclear facilities. The country's former ambassador to the United Nations, Munir Akram, cites fears that such measures will include secret remote controls to shut the nuclear programme down. A European defence official says even video surveillance cameras can intercept or disrupt communications. To avoid such threats, Pakistani engineers laboriously disassemble foreign components and replicate them.

    Wesley Clark, a retired general who once headed NATO's forces, says that “rampant” fears of kill switches make American-backed defence co-operation agreements a harder sell. David Kay, a notable United Nations weapons inspector in Iraq, bemoans “scepticism and paranoia”. You just can't trust anybody these days, even in the weapons business

    www.economist.com/node/18527456
     
  15. Indian Jatt

    Indian Jatt Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    they have increased the budget for the babus from 25 lakhs to 70 lakhs per candidate to conduct election rallies ask them to spend less money........u know might be a little helpful...... :biggthumpup:
     

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