General News, Questions And Discussions : Indian Navy

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by Ankit Kumar 001, Oct 23, 2016.

  1. Ankit Kumar 001
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    Ankit Kumar 001 Captain THINK TANK

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    Hello Everyone.

    Creating this thread for the general news regarding IN which get ignored in the midst of big news items.

    Even if posted as a thread , that thread becomes a needle in hay.

    To make it easy for those who are interested to read about day to day happenings related to IN , I am creating this thread.

    I will try to keep the thread updated regularly.

    Contributions are welcome and appreciated.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Ankit Kumar 001
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    Ankit Kumar 001 Captain THINK TANK

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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

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    INS VIRAT towed from Kochi to Mumbai.
    [​IMG]

    From LiveFist.
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    Hellfire Mod Staff Member MODERATOR

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    Au revoir to INS Viraat?
     
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    Skull and Bones Doctor Death Staff Member MODERATOR

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  5. Ankit Kumar 001
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    Ankit Kumar 001 Captain THINK TANK

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    Private shipyards to build vessels for Indian Navy
    Oct 24, 2016, 02.10AM IST TNN[ Dipak K Dash ]

    NEW DELHI: Small, private Indian shipyards are likely get business from Indian Navy to build ships for defence purposes. The shipping ministry and the Indian Navy are working on a memorandum of understanding (MoU) between the Navy and Cochin Shipyard Ltd (CSL) for this purpose.

    Sources said the issue was discussed recently between shipping minister Nitin Gadkari and defence minister Manohar Parrikar. They said Cochin Shipyard, a government venture, will supervise the work of small shipyards.

    CSL is currently building India's first indigenous aircraft carrier INS Vikrant weighing 40,000 tonnes. Officials said outfitting was underway and it would be ready in the next few years. "Indian shipyards don't need any foreign technology to build ships. They are capable of doing so," said an official.

    The move to give works to Indian shipyards is seen as creating work opportunities for small shipyards, which are going through a bad patch. "Shipyards across the world are facing tough times. Getting work will save jobs of many in this industry and our existing infrastructure can be utilised under the Make in India scheme, rather than giving these tasks to foreign shipyards," a senior executive of a major shipyard said.

    http://m.timesofindia.com/india/Pri...sels-for-Indian-Navy/articleshow/55020962.cms
     
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  6. Ankit Kumar 001
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    Ankit Kumar 001 Captain THINK TANK

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    Wednesday, October 26, 2016
    INS Sumitra Visits Suva, Fiji
    Indian Naval Ship Sumitra, an offshore patrol vessel, has arrived at Suva, Fiji today on a three day visit from 26 to 29 Oct 16, as part of her operational deployment to Southern Indian Ocean and the Western Pacific, in pursuit of India’s ‘Act East’ policy and outreach to friendly countries.

    The visit is aimed at strengthening bilateral ties and enhancing maritime security cooperation between the two countries. Sumitra, is the fourth of the Saryu class ships, based on an indigenous design, constructed by M/s Goa Shipyard Ltd, India. Since commissioning in 2014, the ship has been deployed for multiple operational tasks, the most notable being ‘Operation Rahat’, which entailed the evacuation of personnel of various nationalities from war-torn Yemen in 2015. The ship has a range of 6,500 nautical miles and is capable of embarking one Dhruv/ Chetak helicopter. The ship is commanded by Cdr KP Shreeshan.

    During the stay in harbour, various activities are planned towards enhancing cooperation and mutual understanding between the Indian Navy and the Fiji Navy. Official calls and interaction with dignitaries of the Fiji government and the Fiji Navy, onboard visits by local populace, visits for Indian Navy personnel and professional interaction between personnel of both navies are also planned. The ship’s crew would also participate in community service, sports events and social fixtures. The ship is also carrying five tons of seeds as part of the relief material provided by the Govt of India to Fiji. On departure, the ship is also likely to undertake a Passage Exercise (PASSEX) with the Fiji Naval ships.

    India and Fiji have historical cultural linkages dating back to the 19th Century. The bilateral relationship has grown significantly, with high level exchanges in the recent past. The Hon’ble Prime Minister of India, Shri Narendra Modi visited Fiji in November 2014. The visit of INS Sumitra to Suva will further strengthen this bilateral relationship and contribute to maritime security and peace in the South Western Pacific Ocean.
    http://chinditsdefence.blogspot.in/2016/10/ins-sumitra-visits-suva-fiji.html?spref=tw&m=1
     
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    Ankit Kumar 001 Captain THINK TANK

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    The Indian Navy is on high alert as severe cyclone Kyant is poised to strike the East coast. In a statement on Wednesday, the Navy said, “Ships ready with divers, doctors, inflatable rubber boats, integral helicopters and relief material for over 5000 personnel.” A cyclone making a landfall usually wreaks havoc and causes damage to life and property.

    Earlier in the day, the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) had said that Cyclone ‘Kyant’ over the Bay of Bengal is unlikely to make a landfall, but coastal regions of Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Odisha may expect a wet Diwali. “The cyclonic storm ‘KYANT’ over east-central Bay of Bengal moved further west-southwestwards and lay centred 450 km southeast of Gopalpur, 520 km east-southeast of Vishakhapatnam and 730 km east-northeast of Machilipatnam. The cyclone is most likely to move west-southwestwards towards west central Bay of Bengal during next 72 hours,” the Cyclone Warning Division of India Meteorological Department (IMD) had said.
    M Mohapatra, head of the Cyclone Warning Division, said Kyant was unlikely to make landfall, which means it will not hit the coast.
    The IMD, however, said coastal areas of Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Odisha will witness rainfall, especially during the Diwali weekend. Kyant is expected to fade into deep depression on October 29.
    “Squally winds speed reaching 45-55 kmph gusting to 65 kmph is very likely to prevail along and off south Odisha on October 27 and along and off Andhra Pradesh coasts from October 27 to 30. “Light to moderate rainfall at many places over south Odisha, north coastal Andhra Pradesh is very likely on October 27 and 28.
    “Heavy rainfall at isolated places over south coastal Andhra Pradesh is very likely on October 28 to 30 and over north coastal Tamilnadu on October 29 to 31,” the IMD said. Sea condition will be “rough to very rough” along and off south Odisha on October 27. Similar conditions will persist off Andhra Pradesh coasts during October 27 to 30, it said.
    Fishermen have been advised not to venture into sea off Andhra Pradesh coasts from October 27 onwards.
    (With inputs from PTI)

    http://indianexpress.com/article/in...cyclone-kyant-indian-navy-east-coast-3104288/
     
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  8. Ankit Kumar 001
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    Ankit Kumar 001 Captain THINK TANK

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    Indigenous Is The Way Forward for the Indian Navy
    AIR MARSHAL ANIL CHOPRA

    Thursday, October 27,2016

    An aircraft carrier is a warship that that serves as a seagoing airbase, equipped with a full-length flight deck and facilities for storing and operating fixed wing combat aircraft.

    The first airplane take-off from a ship was made from the British Royal Navy's HMS Hibernia on 9 May 1912. The Imperial Japanese Navy ship ‘Wakamiya’ was the first to launch a full air raid in September 1914. The aircraft carriers traditionally are classified by displacement tonnage and number of aircraft they can carry. Super Carriers are the largest with over 75,000 tonnes displacement and are mostly nuclear powered. Most navies operate only one or two aircraft carriers, if any.

    The USA is a notable exception, with 10 super carriers. A total of 20 fleet carriers are in active service with ten navies. Additionally, the navies of Australia, Brazil, China, France, India, Italy, Japan, Russia, South Korea, Spain, Thailand and the United States also operate ships capable of carrying and operating Short take-off vertical-landing (STOVL) aircraft like the Harrier. Top end carriers use Catapult-assisted take-off and arrested-recovery (CATOBAR). Many others like China, India and Russia use Short take-off and arrested-recovery (STOBAR) system.

    India's first aircraft carrier was INS Vikrant, which was originally British Royal Navy’s HMS Hercules built in 1943, with a displacement of 20,000 tonnes, and was commissioned in the Indian Navy in 1959. It saw action during the 1971 India-Pakistan war and was finally decommissioned in January 1997. The second carrier, 28,000 ton INS Viraat, formerly Royal Navy’s HMS Hermes, was commissioned in May 1987. It sailed for last time on 23 July 2016, and will be formally decommissioned in 2017.

    INS Vikramaditya, a modified Kiev-class carrier with 45,400 tonnes displacement, joined Indian Navy in 2013. Originally commissioned in 1987, it served in Russian Navy till decommissioned in 1996. Russia gave the carrier to India free of cost but charged huge amounts to refurbish and upgrade to Indian Navy requirements. It is designed with the STOBAR system, and can operate up to 34 fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters. MiG-29K fighter is the primary aircraft.

    Indian Navy’s two carriers, Viraat and Vikramaditya, are deployed one each on the West and East coasts. The goal is to have three aircraft carriers, with two fully operational at any time, and third in refit. India is currently working on two Indigenous Aircraft Carriers (IAC) at Cochin Shipyard Limited. These are the largest warships, and the first aircraft carriers to be designed and built in India.

    Work on 40,000 ton, 262 metre long INS Vikrant (IAC-I), started in 2008. It will feature STOBAR and ski-jumps, and operate jet-powered aircraft. The 30-aircraft capable carrier was floated out of its dry dock on 29 December 2011, and launched into water on 12 August 2013. It is scheduled to enter service in 2018. Vikrant will fly MiG-29K and Naval variant of HAL Tejas LCA, and many helicopters.

    The Steel Authority of India (SAIL) supplied the carrier-grade steel for the hull, flight deck and floor compartments. 90% of the body work has been designed and Made-in-India, and about 50% of the propulsion system, and about 30% of the fighting capability of the carrier was Indian.

    The second carrier 65,000 ton INS Vishal (IAC-II) would be able to take larger aircraft. The Naval Design Bureau is preparing the design concept and implementation plans and may seek Russian help to integrate the Russian aircraft. It would be able to operate the Tejas Mk II, DRDO’s under-development AMCA and AURA UAV, and some mid-air refuelling aircraft. It may also use the latest American Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) CATOBAR which will allow launch of heavier aircraft in shorter distance.

    The US has specially cleared the developer General Atomics to give a system demonstra

    http://www.thecitizen.in/index.php/...genous/Is/The/Way/Forward/for/the/Indian/Navy
     
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  9. Ankit Kumar 001
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    Ankit Kumar 001 Captain THINK TANK

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    In August 1947, within a week of India attaining independence from British rule, an Outline Plan for the reorganisation and development of the Indian Navy was prepared by Naval Headquarters. In its preamble, the plan paper said:

    India will never attain security or pre-eminence till she is in a position to maintain her position against every aggressor....A navy commanding the respect of the world is not a luxury for her but a vital necessity.
    Two years later, naval strategist Keshav Vaidya wrote in The Naval Defence of India that the newly independent country should try to be the undisputed power over the waters of the Indian Ocean. The Indian Navy, he emphasised, should become “an invincible navy to defend not only her coast but her distant oceanic frontiers”.

    The lofty ambitions of India’s strategists were, however, brought down to earth by the political leadership which was adamantly opposed to beefing up the military. Barring a few, like Deputy Prime Minister Sardar Patel, who supported a “strong navy”, the Gandhians, including Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, had an aversion for the military.

    Luckily for India, Britain had a partly built aircraft carrier – a legacy of the Second World War – which the Royal Navy was looking to offload. Governor General Louis Mountbatten prevailed upon Nehru to buy the 16,000-tonne vessel. Mountbatten hoped that by offering it a British carrier, the Indian Navy could be persuaded into becoming the bulwark of a Commonwealth naval alliance. Plus, the Royal Navy would pocket some cash in the bargain.

    India did not toe the line on alliances with its former oppressors, but it agreed to buy the vessel. So, instead of being consigned to the scrapyard, the warship was completed and commissioned into the Indian Navy on 4 March 1961 as the INS Vikrant. And that’s how India achieved the miracle of a poor country acquiring an aircraft carrier.

    Carrier strategy pays off

    The Indian Navy’s early investment in the carrier paid handsome dividends. In the 1971 War, INS Vikrant, supported by just two warships, bottled up the Pakistan Navy’s eastern wing in Chittagong harbour. More than 97,000 Pakistan Army troops were planning to escape on board these ships, which were to make a dash for the open sea. Vikrant’s vigil – and the sinking of several Pakistani merchant vessels by its jets – hastened the largest capitulation of troops since General Paulus’ Sixth Army surrendered in Stalingrad in 1943.

    The Indian Navy received another bonus, thanks to its flagship. In November 1971, well over a month before the declaration of war, the Pakistan Navy had despatched an American-gifted submarine named PNS Ghazi – with the mission to sink the Indian carrier.

    When Indian intelligence got wind of the Ghazi plan, the navy hid the carrier in the Andaman & Nicobar Islands – over 1,500 km from the mainland. The navy then built an elaborate ruse that lured the Ghazi. First, it positioned its largest warship, the INS Rajput, off Visakhapatnam harbour and created heavy radio traffic that mimicked the Vikrant’s. Secondly, the port authorities placed huge orders for food and supplies that would normally be required when a ship of Vikrant’s capacity sails in.

    The Ghazi took the bait and started laying mines in the port’s channel. But the hunter became the hunted on 4 December that year, when it blew up and sank in the harbour. While the Indian Navy claimed that it was INS Rajput’s depth charges that caused the explosion, the Pakistanis say their submarine was destroyed by an internal explosion. Whatever caused the explosion, the Indian Navy definitely got good bang for its carrier.


    No power like sea power

    Despite the proliferation of new carrier missiles from Russia and China – which has spent billions on the development of a ballistic anti-carrier weapon – the carrier continues to inspire awe. “The aircraft carrier in the 21st century continues to remain the most conspicuous symbol of a nation’s maritime power,” says former Commodore and author C Uday Bhaskar. “Nothing projects raw combat power like these citadels of maritime power.”

    In the 2009 report ‘China’s Maritime Rights and Navy’, Senior Captain Li Jie, an analyst at the Chinese navy’s strategic think tank, Naval Research Institute, agrees: “No great power that has become a strong power has achieved this without developing carriers.”

    If India is to face off against the threat from foreign navies, it needs carriers – several of them. Providing security cover to its maritime trade with land-based airpower solutions would require a huge number of aircraft. It would also require treaties – that may be revoked – for landing on foreign bases.

    A navy without airpower is a sitting duck. Says Bhaskar:

    Can India afford not to have aircraft carriers for air-defence and anti-submarine roles? The survival of the surface fleet in the modern world is highly suspect without carriers for their defence. Technology has altered the equation and the carrier is (now) needed to protect the surface fleet.
    But despite Vikrant’s stellar performance, India’s political leadership did not shed its continental mindset. No effort was made to construct a carrier at home, and India continued to rely on hand-me-down carriers from Britain (INS Viraat in 1987) and Russia (INS Vikramaditya in 2013).

    The upshot: the navy is down to a single carrier after Viraat sailed into retirement last year. Worse, the sole carrier, Vikramaditya, is currently in dry dock, which means if war breaks out, the navy will have to manage without its 44,000-tonne flagship.

    New breed of carriers

    The Indian Maritime Doctrine of 2015 for the first time states that the future fleet will be based on three carrier battle groups (CBGs). This means if one is undergoing refit or repairs, there will always be two carriers available – for the eastern and western seaboards.

    The first of India’s new-generation carriers is the 40,000-tonne Vikrant class IAC I, or Indigenous Aircraft Carrier I. It will feature STOBAR (short takeoff but arrested recovery) and ski-jumps. The carrier was floated out of its dry dock at Cochin Shipyard Ltd (CSL) on 29 December 2011 and launched on 12 August 2013.

    Ship construction involves the following stages: production, keel laying, launch, outfitting, basin trials, contractor sea trials and final machinery trials. Currently, INS Vikrant is at the outfitting stage, and the final bill is estimated at $3.76 billion.

    While INS Vikrant will be smaller than India’s current flagship, INS Vikramaditya, the next vessel, INS Vishal (IAC II), will be a 65,000-tonne beast. This new supercarrier will purportedly feature significant design changes, including possible nuclear propulsion and catapult-assisted takeoff but arrested recovery (CATOBAR) and the electromagnetic aircraft launch systems (EMALS) from the United States (US).

    In the summer of 2015, Russia, France, the United Kingdom (UK) and the US received requests for technical and costing proposals regarding the design of India’s new aircraft carrier. The two top contenders are Russia and France, given that India operates aircraft from both countries. However, the dark horse appears to be the US, which could nose ahead with its EMALS.

    Russian Shtorm

    Russia has offered its Shtorm supercarrier design. Powered by either nuclear or conventional propulsion, the ship can remain at sea for 120 days and sail up to 30 knots or 55kph. It can accommodate a crew of up to 5,000 and can carry 80-90 deck-based aircraft.

    There are two problems with this offer. One, Russia has never built a nuclear-powered carrier before, although it has plenty of experience in building other types of large nuclear-powered vessels, including submarines. Second, the 1,082 foot long Shtorm will have a displacement of 1,00,000 tonnes, which is well over India’s initial requirement. Does India need such overkill?

    Going by the past record, Russia may have the edge. Not only does Shtorm dovetail with the ‘Make in India’ pitch, but Moscow also has a good record of transferring cutting-edge technologies to Indian manufacturers.

    Says Russian military analyst Ilya Kramnik:

    It is important to eliminate the Americans from the possibility of participating in this project. All that Washington can really do under these circumstances is to try to push India to abandon the idea of using a nuclear power plant, and then attempt to sell New Delhi a converted boiler and turbine aircraft carrier of the ‘Kitty Hawk’ variety. The option is possible, especially if India decides it needs to save money.

    According to Kramnik, the US usually refuses to work in consortiums with competitors, especially Russians. “The situation, in which India suddenly would place MiG-29K fighter jets on an American-built carrier, is almost impossible,” he explains.

    It can be assumed with a high degree of probability that, in accordance with the longstanding tradition of the Indian military, none of these bidders will be chosen as the “sole” contractor. Rather, a multilateral consortium will be built, in which each participant will play a well-defined role.

    American pitch

    It would be unprecedented if the US goes ahead with the transfer of EMALS technology to India, which is not a close ally like the UK, Norway or Italy.

    However, the US appears to be seriously wooing India. Chief of US Naval Operations, Admiral John Richardson, says India and the US are making progress in talks on the joint development of an aircraft carrier, potentially the biggest military collaboration between them.

    Richardson said the two sides had held talks on a range of issues relating to the next-generation Indian carrier from its design to construction. "We are making very good progress, I am very pleased with the progress to date and optimistic we can do more in the future. That’s on a very solid track," Richardson said while in India in February this year.India and the US have formed a joint working group on aircraft carrier technology cooperation, but there is no clarity on whether the Americans will offer EMALS technology for Indian aircraft carriers.

    EMALS could be a game changer. Defence News explains:

    Using electromagnetic technology, the system delivers substantial improvements in system maintenance, increased reliability and efficiency, higher-launch energy capacity, and more accurate end-speed control, with a smooth acceleration at both high and low speeds. By allowing linear acceleration over time, electromagnetic catapults also place less stress on the aircraft.
    In simple language, carrier-based aircraft operate under suboptimal capacity because of their short takeoffs. For instance, the stated combat range of a MiG-29K is 700km, but in real combat it would be a lot lower because it cannot take off with a full tank of gas. EMALS makes life easier for navy pilots.

    Continued....
     
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  10. Ankit Kumar 001
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    Vikrant and Vishal: Less than smooth sailing

    While talks proceed on the future carrier, Vikrant’s construction has not kept in step. A report tabled by the Comptroller & Auditor General (CAG) on 26 July 2016 says the programme has suffered delays because of drastic revisions right through the carrier’s timeline.

    While the Defence Ministry and the Indian Navy insist the ship’s final delivery timeline is December 2018, the CAG report, ‘Union Defence Services Navy and Coast Guard’, says the delivery of the carrier with completion of all activities is likely to be achieved only by 2023.

    A key area where things went wrong is General Arrangement or GA – the document based on which the ship is designed and constructed. The GA drawings principally represent volumes, spaces, compartments, bulkheads, hull forms, decks and main equipment.

    According to the CAG report,

    There were more than 4270 changes to the GA document by the Indian Navy and, due to design changes, more than 1150 modifications in hull structure had been done by the shipyard. Frequent modification to the hull structure was one of the main reasons for a delay of approximately two years in hull fabrication.
    Steep learning curve

    CSL clearly lacked the experience required to handle a project of such a gigantic scale. A technical audit of the shipyard carried out by France’s DCN discovered the shipyard had “never built warships and was not used to the complexity of their designs, hull and systems”.

    The shipyard’s organisation was mostly vertical without enough functional links between various departments. “It had no real project management central organisation and was working with many separated departments.”

    To adapt CSL to produce an aircraft carrier, DCN prescribed basic proposals with respect to augmentation of the shipyard’s infrastructure, organisation and human resources, which included creation of a shipyard project management team and a liaison team.

    CAG observes:

    Since CSL was constructing an aircraft carrier for the first time, it was incumbent upon them to fully implement the DCN proposals so as to execute the project within approved timelines.
    However, this was not done, and the project management team remained a weak one.

    Delays are inevitable because this is India’s first aircraft carrier project. But it really shouldn’t take 24 years to construct a medium-sized aircraft carrier. After all, it takes the US only seven years to authorise, construct and deliver a 1,00,000-tonne carrier with nuclear propulsion.

    Nuclear vs conventional

    According to Eric Wertheim, the author of Combat Fleets of the World, the odds of India needing the bluewater capability a nuclear carrier would bring, are small. “If you’re looking at regional operations, then I think it makes less sense to do nuclear propulsion,” he told the US Naval Institute.

    However, the Maritime Doctrine of 2015 lays out that the India Navy’s strategic vision will no longer be limited to the northern Indian Ocean, but will extend to the southeast Indian Ocean, Red Sea, western coast of Africa and the Mediterranean Sea. The new carriers are not only aimed at countering the growing Chinese presence in the near seas but if needed, the Indian Navy must have the capability to sail out to distant troubled spots.

    In terms of gas mileage, conventional aircraft carriers are the biggest guzzlers of fuel. The USS Independence, for instance, consumes well over 5,67,000 litres of fuel a day. An oil-importing country like India can ill afford to burn that much fuel.

    Nuclear-powered carriers cost more to build but are more energy-efficient. They can remain at sea for up to a year or more and only need to return to port for crew rotation. They also require less downtime during maintenance as compared with a conventionally powered ship.

    In a paper titled ‘Nuclear Propulsion For Naval Platforms: The Navy's Perspective’, Captain Vikram Bora and Commodore K J Singh argue that if India wants to take full advantage of the latest technologies, then nuclear is the way to go. “In the case of large surface combatants like aircraft carriers, nuclear power provides high propulsive power and long endurance, whilst also catering for the requirement of short bursts of very high electric power for aircraft launch systems on certain state of the art platforms,” they say.

    “Nuclear propulsion is an area of technology which is essential for any navy aiming for a global presence,” the authors maintain. “The technology has enormous potential, both for surface combatants and submarines.”

    On the flip side, decommissioning a nuclear power carrier is a nightmare and can take years, compared with just weeks for a conventional ship. The cost is estimated at $500 million per ship.

    Way forward: Look to the past

    Since Rig Vedic times up to the last Chola kings, the Indian Ocean was literally India’s ocean. However, in the later half of the previous millennium, India became dominated by land-centric rulers from Central Asia who had little maritime knowledge or interest. Consequently, India yielded control of the sea to the European powers.

    However, with the rise of the Marathas in the early eighteenth century, the focus on sea power returned. The Marathas enjoyed many tactical successes against the western navies. Notable among these was the Maratha blockade of British-held Mumbai port that led to the British East India Company ceding a ransom of 8,750 pounds. In the year 1721, the Maratha Navy even defeated a Portuguese-British combined assault on Alibagh.

    The Maratha Admiral of the Fleet, Kanhoji Angre, defeated the Western navy of his day. For 33 years until his death in 1729, the Indian fleets remained undefeated. Wrote British historian Charles Kincaid in the History of the Maratha People: “Victorious alike over the English, Dutch and the Portuguese, the Maratha admirals sailed the Arabian Sea in triumph.”

    Although the old dream of making the Indian Ocean an India’s ocean is no longer a component of the navy’s doctrine, dominating the blue waters is part of the plan. Or to use former Admiral Vishnu Bhagwat’s words, enhancing India's force projection capability is a “national requirement on the strategic frontier, not at the doorstep”.

    Rakesh Krishnan Simha
    Rakesh Krishnan Simha is a New Zealand-based journalist and writes on defence and foreign affairs for Russia Beyond the Headlines, a global media project of Moscow-based Rossiyskaya Gazeta. He is on the advisory board of Europe-based Modern Diplomacy.

    http://swarajyamag.com/defence/blue...-navys-journey-from-carriers-to-supercarriers

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    Indian Navy's First Training Squadron visits Myanmar
    ANI | New Delhi [India] Nov 02, 2016 04:27 PM IST

    Indian Naval Ships Tir and Sujata, along with Indian Coast Guard Ship Varuna, comprising the 1st Training Squadron are visiting Yangon, Myanmar from November 2 to November 6 as part of their Overseas Deployment during Autumn Term 16.

    Senior Officer of the 1st Training Squadron, Captain D J Revar, is embarked on board INS Tir. The Chief of the Naval Staff Admiral Sunil Lanba is also on an official visit to Myanmar during the visit of the training squadron.

    India and Myanmar have a close, long-standing relationship covering a wide spectrum of activities and interactions, which has strengthened over the years. Visits by ships to each other's countries as well as Co-ordinated Patrols (CORPATs) provide opportunities for extensive operational and training engagements and contributes to the maintenance of good order at sea.

    The present deployment of the training squadron to Yangon would further cement the close relations between the two nations and the two navies.

    The First Training Squadron forms part of Southern Naval Command (SNC) and comprises Indian Naval Ships Tir, Shardul, Sujata, ICGS Varuna and two Sail Training Ships Sudarshini and Tarangini, all of which have been built in India.

    The primary aim of the squadron is to impart training to naval and coast guard trainees, with a 24 weeks ab-initio sea training being imparted.

    Training is imparted in seamanship, navigation, ship handling, boat work and technical aspects, etc whilst being exposed to the rigours of life at sea, so as to earn their 'sea legs'.

    The Southern Naval Command is the Training Command of the Indian Navy.

    http://wap.business-standard.com/ar...g-squadron-visits-myanmar-116110200857_1.html
     
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    Navy conducts offshore security exercise Prasthan
    PTI Wednesday, November 2, 2016


    Text resize AA
    Visakhapatnam, Nov 2 (PTI) A two-day offshore security exercise named Exercise Prasthan was conducted by the city-based Eastern Naval Command (ENC).

    The exercise which was conducted on offshore rigs in the KG Basin and Ravva area located in the Krishna Godavari Basin 25 nm South West of Kakinada concluded today, a Naval release said.

    Mock drills to exercise various contingencies such as asymmetric threat (terrorist action), oil spill, casualty evacuation and fire were conducted, it added.

    The exercise was aimed to evaluate surveillance capabilities of offshore rigs against unaltered intruders approaching by boat / swimming and to evaluate capabilities of security agencies in patrolling to prevent intruders from accessing offshore rigs, said the release.

    The exercise also prepared all agencies in handling a crisis situation developing in the Offshore Development Area.

    Besides Naval Officer-in-Charge, Andhra Pradesh, the overall coordinator of the Exercise, the other major stakeholders included Indian Coast Guard, ONGC, Gujarat State Petroleum Corporation (GSPC), Reliance Industries and Cairn Energy.

    In addition, Navy ships Kora, Tarmugli, Astradharini, four ISVs, One Indian Coast Guard IPV/IB, one UH3H helicopter and marine commandos also participated in the exercise,the release added. PTI COR NRB BSA RDS
    http://m.indiatoday.in/story/navy-conducts-offshore-security-exercise-prasthan/1/800961.html

    An interesting/sad thing. Even without an MLU , the almost scrap US Sea Kings are still working.
     
  13. Ankit Kumar 001
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    INS Sumitra enters Sydney Port, Australia 04 07 Nov 16
    | Delhi Nov 04, 2016 02:20 PM IST

    INS Sumitra enters Sydney Port, Australia 04 07 Nov 16
    In pursuit of Indias Act East policy and outreach to friendly countries, the Indian Navys Offshore Patrol Vessel Sumitra, has arrived at Sydney, Australia on a three day visit from 04-07 Nov 16.

    The visit to Australia is aimed at strengthening bilateral ties and enhancing maritime security cooperation between the two countries. During the stay in harbour, various activities are planned towards enhancing cooperation and mutual understanding between the two navies such as official calls, reception on board, ship open to visitors, guided tours for Indian Naval personnel and professional interaction between personnel of both the navies. During the port call, INS Sumitra will also participate in the Festival of India". On departure, the ship would also undertake a Passage Exercise (PASSEX) with RAN ships.

    India and Australia have a strong bilateral relationship with growing convergence on economic and strategic issues. Maritime interaction between the two nations has also been steadily growing with the institutionalization of biennial bilateral maritime exercise AUSINDEX, with its inaugural edition being held in Bay of Bengal in 2015. An IN delegation participated in Ex KAKADU 16 hosted by Australia in Sep 16. The port visit by Sumitra would further strengthen bilateral ties between the two nations and enhance maritime security, cooperation and interoperability between the two Navies.

    Sumitra, is the fourth of the Saryu class ships, based on an indigenous design and constructed by M/s Goa Shipyard Ltd, India. Since commissioning in 2014, the ship has been deployed for multiple operational tasks, the most notable being Operation Rahat, which entailed the evacuation of personnel of various nationalities from war-torn Yemen in 2015. The ship has a range of 6,500 nautical miles and is capable of embarking one Dhruv/ Chetak helicopter. The ship is commanded by Cdr KP Shreeshan.

    http://wap.business-standard.com/ar...rt-australia-04-07-nov-16-116110400538_1.html
     
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  15. Ankit Kumar 001
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    Ankit Kumar 001 Captain THINK TANK

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    Indian Navy to buy 12 amphibious rescue aircraft from Japan
    7 Nov, 2016
    Source : YouTube
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    $1.5 Billion deal

    India will purchase 12 amphibious rescue aircraft from Japanese manufacturer ShinMaywa Industries worth $1.5 billion-$1.6 billion. Japan and India have been holding talks on the purchase for two years.

    Japan's first sale since lifting of 50-year ban

    It would one of Japan's first sales of military equipment since Prime Minister Shinzo Abe lifted a 50-year ban on arms exports and it reflects growing defence ties between the two countries.

    A multi-purpose amphibian

    The ShinMaywa US-2 is an amphibious short take-off and landing (STOL) aircraft with a flexible airframe design allowing it to be converted into a fire-fighting amphibian, passenger transport aircraft, or a multi-purpose amphibian. The aircraft can carry up to 20 passengers or 12 stretchers. The aircraft can quickly reach remote islands and sites of maritime accidents during search and rescue (SAR) operations.

    Cockpit of US-2

    The US-2 is equipped with a glass cockpit with integrated instrument panel. A single LCD panel integrates the digitalised meters. The aircraft incorporates fly-by-wire flight control system that improves the safety and controllability of the aircraft.

    Engines and landing gear

    The US-2 aircraft is powered by four Rolls-Royce AE 2100J turboprop engines and is capable of flying at a maximum altitude of over 6,000 metres. The aircraft is equipped with a tricycle type landing gear and its STOL capabilities enable the US-2 to take off and land within very short distances on land and water. The maximum take-off distance required on land is 490 metres. On rough waters, the spray suppressor and spray strip aboard the US-2 allows a smooth operation for wave height of 3 metres.

    Performance

    The US-2 aircraft can fly at a maximum altitude of over 6,000m with a cruising speed of 480km/h and maximum speed of 560km/h. The maximum range of the aircraft is over 4,500km. The maximum take-off weights of the aircraft on land is 47.7t whereas on water it is 43t.

    To be deployed in Bay of Bengal

    The Indian navy plans to position the seaplanes in the Andaman islands and this will give coverage to the entire Bay of Bengal and establish India as the dominant power in the region which is bordered by Burma and Indonesia.

    http://m.economictimes.com/slidesho...japan/1-5-billion-deal/slideshow/55287127.cms
     

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