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HAL / Hindustan aeronautics limited

Discussion in 'Indian Defence Industry' started by TSUNAMI, Nov 1, 2012.

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  1. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

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    Govt to dilute 10% stake in military plane maker HAL

    The government has approved sale of 10% stake in public sector military plane maker Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd through an initial public offer. This, at a time when it is witnessing competition from private players such as Reliance Defence, Adani and Tata Group who are bidding to bag fighter plane contracts for the Indian armed forces.

    The Bengaluru-based HAL has filed its draft Red Herring Prospectus (DHRP) with market regulator Securities and Exchange Board of India (Sebi) on September 29, the firm said in a statement on Sunday.

    So far, HAL has been the sole player in the country building fighter aircraft such as Sukhoi-30-MkI and the Hawk advanced jet trainers under licensed production and helicopters such as Dhruv advanced light helicopter which it has designed in-house. It also is the designated agency to produce Tejas, the homegrown light combat aircraft for the air force.

    In September, HAL chairman and managing director T Suvarna Raju said the company has an order book of Rs 41,000 crore which is "very low for an aeronautical industry." It has orders to make 35 Su-30-MkI planes and 40 Tejas aircraft, while awaiting confirmation of a follow on order for 83 Tejas planes.

    Last year, when India signed a deal to buy 36 Rafale jet aircraft from France after it cancelled a tender to buy 126 multi-role medium combat aircraft, it designated Reliance Defence as the local partner to deliver offsets worth over Rs 21,000 crore. Incidentally, Rafale had shortlisted Reliance Defence as its local partner to deliver offsets when it bid for the 126 plane deal that it won in 2012.

    HAL is also not in the race to build the 100-200 single engine jet fighter deal for which Sweden's Saab is fielding the Gripen and US plane maker Lockheed Martin plans to sell its latest block of F-16 fighter. Saab has signed up the Adani Group that lacks aerospace manufacturing expertise as its local partner, while Lockheed Martin has chosen Tata Advanced Systems Ltd (TASL), a Tata Group firm that has so far build systems and components for global aerospace makers.

    The public sector aircraft maker had reported profit before tax of Rs 3,294 crore on revenue of Rs 17,406 crore for fiscal 2016-17.


    http://www.business-standard.com/ar...-military-plane-maker-hal-117100100356_1.html
     
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  2. ranadd

    ranadd 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Which year is the start month?:agree::agree:
     
  3. ranadd

    ranadd 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    This is too little IMO.

    HAL should needs to be split, based on their delivery. Company needs not be split into small parts, that would defeat the purpose. However, having distinct Identity, order books, mid level management etc would help a lot to manage projects.

    This have been suggested so many times. The Rotorcraft & OEM divisions should be made into their own organizations in HAL years back. But no, its all a one big bucket where all the Guptas, Kumars & Swamis cover each other.

    Why the need for virtual companies inside a company? Division performance becomes more visible and they will be held accountable.
     
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  4. Satendra kumar

    Satendra kumar FULL MEMBER

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    HAL has been defence major player,with current defence budget also for teritorial countries HAL and other Indian defence companies has given opportunities for modernising all Indian defence department.
     
  5. Anish

    Anish Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    HAL to blame for Mig 21 crashes not IAF pilot training.

    HAL used substandard material in assembly of Mig21, did not sanitise assembly area which lead to foreign objects entering engine and other components which led to structural stress which resulted in flame out prematurely.
    HAL QC not trained in aircraft assembly and maintenance.

    Important this video is spread around now we are at verge of burying ADA's first project and importing F-16 in large numbers :)
     
  6. Satendra kumar

    Satendra kumar FULL MEMBER

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    Human error may be a factor or accidental due to technical problem,Ecuador is a friendly country,Dhruv is one of the best choppers in the world,with latest technology,I think Dhruv still the top contender.
     
  7. Anish

    Anish Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Dhruv and other HAL products have collapsed in international export markets.

    Sri Lanka went for Yak-130 over Tejas Mk1.

    And many other similar failures for HAL globally and the same type of failures will emerge in a massive way domestically
     
  8. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Naval Air: No Mercy For Insufficiently Patriotic SailorsMay 5, 2017: In early 2017 the Indian Navy was forced to buy another 16 Dhruv helicopters. At the same time the Indian Coast Guard was forced to accept another 16. Why the reluctance of the seagoing services to operate this Indian developed and made helicopter? In short because of problems that have been around for a long time and never get fixed. It all began back in 2010 when the navy bought six Dhruvs for evaluation and did not like what they saw. The main complaints were lack of engine power and poor reliability. These were considered fatal flaws for helicopters operating off ships and used for SAR (search and rescue) and ASW (anti-submarine warfare) work. Since then the manufacturer has made improvements and addressed most of the complaints. But like the original, the later models of Dhruv were more promise than performance and the seagoing forces wanted to buy more reliable foreign helicopters.

    The 5.5 ton Dhruv was in development for two decades before the first one was delivered in 2002. The Dhruv can carry up to 14 passengers or four stretchers. Max load is 2.5 tons and endurance is about two hours (depending on load and altitude). The Dhruv can also fly as high as 6,000 meters (nearly 20,000 feet). Northern India has a lot of mountains, so operating at high altitude was a key design requirement.

    By 2017 over 250 had been built or were on order. Most went to the Indian Army. But some foreign customers (Nepal and Myanmar) also took a few. A series of crashes early on indicated some basic design flaws, which the manufacturer insisted did not exist. The navy disagreed, even though the fleet was desperate to replace over three dozen of its elderly British Sea King helicopters (a 1950s design, and the Indian Navy models are 20-35 years old) and a dozen Russian KA-28s. The navy was allowed to get some foreign helicopters for missions that were clearly beyond the capabilities of the Dhruv, but otherwise the Dhruv was mandatory.

    Until 2010 the “Indian made”, Dhruv was assembled mostly (90 percent) with imported parts. The manufacturer had kept quiet about this because at least half the parts in "Indian made" weapons are supposed to be made in India. Since then the percentage of Indian made components has increased. As embarrassing as this revelation was, it was the performance problems that bothered military users the most although Indian made components often generate a lot of user complaints.
     
  9. zebra7

    zebra7 Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Post the source of your post
     
  10. GuardianRED

    GuardianRED Captain FULL MEMBER

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    Why are you repeating the same post ?
     
  11. Zer0reZ

    Zer0reZ 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    India’s HAL Among World’s Top 4 Light Military Helicopter Manufacturers

    India’s Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) is projected to be the third among the world’s top four manufacturers of light military helicopters weighting less than 15000 pounds, over the next 15 years.

    In a report compiled by market research firm Forecast International, Airbus Helicopters is projected to lead the light military rotorcraft market manufacturing 420 units for a 26.1 percent market share from 2017-2031.

    China's Avicopter is expected to take the second place with production of 301 units for an 18.7 percent share. Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd of India will produce 257 units, a 16 percent share, while Bell Helicopter is projected to be fourth, with production of 225 units for a 14 percent share.

    More than 1,600 light military helicopters will be built over the next 15-years by manufacturers worldwide for a value of about $22.2 billion, according to a report by market intelligence firm Forecast International Tuesday which said it came to the conclusion using data from its Platinum Forecast System 3.1.

    Production of light military rotorcraft, weighing less than 15,000 pounds (8600 kilograms) has been on the upswing since 2014, rising from the 160 units produced that year to 208 in 2016 and further increasing to 217 in 2017.

    A decline in annual build rates is expected to set in soon, and will last until 2023, when production of 73 rotorcraft is forecast, the company said. But some minor growth and longer-term stability is expected, with production rising to 87 units in 2024. Production rates will then remain at between 75 and 87 units per year through at least 2030.

    Forecast International senior aerospace analyst Raymond Jaworowski said, "the effects of increased defense spending on rotorcraft acquisition will be more apparent outside the U.S., where some countries could accelerate certain fleet modernization plans," Jaworowski said.

    "While North America and Europe are currently the two largest regional markets for light military rotorcraft, Asia will grow in importance as a regional market over the next 15 years.
     
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  12. Agent_47

    Agent_47 Admin - Blog IDF NewBie

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    How Brahmos missile got integrated with Sukhoi-30 fighter plane

    It was a hot summer forenoon of 1 May 2013 when as chairman of the Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL), I had a strategic discussion with CEO of Brahmos Aerospace, at his office in Kirby Place, New Delhi. During the discussions he enquired whether HAL had the technical capability to integrate the Brahmos missile on to the Air Force’s Su-30 MKI fighters.

    He also said that Russia had offered to do it at a cost of $200 million (Rs 1,300 crore approx). He was not sure, however, if spending so much would help India gain any technological expertise. Air Marshal Arup Raha, vice-chief of IAF (who later took over as IAF chief in December 2013), told me in another meeting that this integration will be a game changer for the Air Force and 40 Su-30s would need such modifications.

    Our designers in Nashik went into the details of the challenges involved and a few months later, we confirmed we could do it. There was, however, another challenge. A.S. Pillai, CEO, Brahmos, indicated that he had a budget of only Rs 80 crore for this project and requested HAL to stay within this.

    Considering the financial limitation of Brahmos, the HAL board took a historic decision that even if the firm will not make a profit on this task, it will be a good project and should be undertaken in national interest.

    It was for the first time in the history of HAL that it was decided to absorb the design and development costs, waive the profit element and contingency costs and finalise a technology project for only Rs 80 crore. This showed the positive synergy between IAF and the industry where cost becomes secondary and national pride, competence and technology development comes to the fore.

    Four years later, on 22 November 2017, a Su-30 MKI took off from Kalaikunda, carrying a 2.5-tonne Brahmos missile for test firing at a target in the Bay of Bengal. In copy book style, the missile struck a target on sea, located 260 km away with a high degree of precision and perfection.

    We celebrate this success in two ways. First, the integration of Brahmos Air Launch Cruise Missile (ALCM) greatly enhances IAF’s ability to strike heavily defended targets deep into enemy territory, up to a range of 2,100 km (or 3,900 kms with a refueller).

    Even if Brahmos is fired from a Su-30 MKI that remains within Indian borders, a wide strike range of 290 km is now available. This will be a paradigm shift for tomorrow’s confrontations with hostile countries. In active wars, the top priority is to destroy strategic enemy locations and defence infrastructure such as nuclear weapon batteries and the air launched Brahmos will provide India these capabilities.

    Second, the test is a demonstration of how indigenous technical capabilities have been developed in the country. More than 100 Indian companies involving 20,000 specialists, engineers and technicians work on Brahmos manufacturing and technical modifications.

    Modification of the Su-30 MKI for Brahmos integration involved safe stores separation analysis consisting of wind tunnel and CFD (computational fluid dynamics) analysis. Watertight NMG (numerical master geometry) of the aircraft had to be generated from 2D drawings.

    Structural modifications had to be within the aircraft’s centre of gravity (CG) envelope and in such a way that they did not alter vibration characteristics. Carriage and release actuation along with electrical and avionics integration was another challenge. FTI (flight test instrumentation) for the operations along with missile system software modifications also had to be undertaken. All this was done by a consortium of Indian industry led by HAL.

    Economic prosperity and technology prowess of a country depend on how the scientific and technological community of that country come together on projects of strategic importance. Many other agencies like RCMA, DGAQA, CEMILAC, NAL, AST, SDI, MSQAA, NEUCON, and ZEUSS NUNERIX worked together on this project.

    The Brahmos integration is just the beginning. The know-how developed on this project should now be leveraged to develop an upgraded Su-30 (Super Su-30) with stronger structures, better avionics and radars and more effective combat capabilities. This can create an impregnable combat cover of at least 1,500 km depth around all Indian borders — at land or on high seas.

    Brahmos missile has now achieved the challenges of integration into all three versions for land, water and air attacks. I understand that Brahmos Aerospace will now be working on the hypersonic version (5-7 Mach) with an extended range of 600 km.

    R.K. Tyagi is president, Aeronautical Society of India and former HAL chairman

    https://theprint.in/2017/11/29/insi...-got-integrated-with-sukhoi-30-fighter-plane/

    @Sancho @PARIKRAMA @randomradio @GuardianRED @Gessler
     
  13. Butter Chicken

    Butter Chicken Captain FULL MEMBER

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    This is classic russian tactic- sell maal at low cost upfront and recover money from spares and upgrades
     
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  14. Sancho

    Sancho Lt. Colonel IDF NewBie

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    As long as we are not capable to do similar things alone, we always will be asked extra money. On the other hand, who else then Russia gives is that kind of missiles and allows that level of customization?
    So it's good that we achieved it alone, but we should not forget that Russia was gratious in the first place.
     
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