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How India's Cold Start is Turning the Heat on Pakistan

Discussion in 'Indian Defence Industry' started by tariqkhan18, Dec 28, 2010.

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  1. tariqkhan18

    tariqkhan18 Major Staff Member ADMINISTRATOR

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    Pakistan's army generals are known to walk with a swagger. They have reason to. After all, they have been ruling the country of over 200 million people like their personal fiefdom for over half a century. Also, they are in an exclusive club of one - Pakistan is the only Islamic country that possesses nuclear weapons. (Just don't bring up the fact that these generals have lost four wars against India.) So why are they suddenly squirming after Wikileaks hit the ceiling?

    According to a leaked cable, more than the al-Qaida, American drones or a hostile Afghan government, what is scaring the living daylights out of the Pakistani generals is Cold Start - India's version of blitzkrieg. So deeply does it dread this new war fighting strategy that the Pakistani military has cranked up its production of nuclear weapons, sparking a nuclear arms race in the region.
    COMBATING STATUS QUO
    So what exactly is Cold Start and how is it changing the military equation in this part of the world? Will this new doctrine of war offer India more options in combating Pakistani adventurism and rolling back Islamic terrorism? Or will it contribute to more regional instability?

    To get the subcontinental drift, one has to look at the Pakistani military mindset. Each of the four wars - in 1948, 1965, 1971 and 1999 - was launched by the Pakistani military which factored in two key elements. One, despite their 0-4 record against India, it is ingrained in the Pakistani military that a Pakistani soldier is equal to 10 Indian soldiers, and therefore India's defenses should quickly collapse. There was also the bizarre belief - eerily still a serious consideration at the highest echelons of Pakistani military decision making - that divine intervention will be a decisive factor in India's defeat.

    Secondly, Pakistan knows if its military thrusts fail, its patrons, the US and China, can be relied upon to bring in the United Nations, work the diplomatic back channels, get the world media to raise the alarm, and issue veiled threats, bringing pressure upon India to call off its counterattack.

    INDIA: LUMBERING GIANT
    Now the whole jing-bang of India's military strategy is that after the defending corps halt Pakistan's armored thrusts, the elite strike corps will roll towards the border, penetrate deep into Pakistani territory to destroy the Pakistan Army through massive tanks thrusts and artillery barrages, supported by round the clock aerial bombing of military targets.


    Sounds like a bullet-proof strategy. But in reality that has never happened because India's mighty military machine has the agility of an elephant on tranquilizers. Its strike corps are based in central India, a significant distance from the international border. It takes anywhere from two to three weeks for these three elite armies to reach the front.

    Because of the long mobilization period, the intervention of Western nations and the truce-happy nature of India's political leadership, India's military brass could not use their strike forces in three of the four wars.

    THE NEED FOR SPEED
    This is, of course, what Cold Start is intended to avoid. According to Dr Subhash Kapila, an international relations and strategic affairs analyst at the South Asia Analysis Group, Cold Start is designed to seize the initiative and finish the war before India's political leadership loses its nerve.

    "Long mobilization time gives the political leadership in India time to waver under pressure, and in the process deny the Indian Army its due military victories," says Dr Kapila. "The new war doctrine would compel the political leadership to give political approval "ab-initio' and thereby free the armed forces to generate their full combat potential from the outset."

    The crux of Cold Start is this:
    * Strike corps won't be allowed to languish in the hinterland. There will be eight "Battle Groups", comprising independent armoured and mechanised brigades that would launch counterattacks within hours.
    * These Battle Groups will be fully integrated with the Indian Air Force and naval aviation, and launch multiple strikes into Pakistan.
    * Each Battle Group will be the size of a division and highly mobile unlike the lumbering giants, the strike corps.
    * And ominously for Pakistan, the Battle Groups will be moved well forward from existing garrisons. India's strike forces will no longer sit idle waiting for the opportune moment, which never came in the last wars.

    CORNERING PAKISTAN
    In a paper on Cold Start, Walter C. Ladwig of Oxford University writes, "As the Indian military enhances its ability to implement Cold Start, it is simultaneously degrading the chance that diplomacy could diffuse a crisis on the subcontinent. In a future emergency, the international community may find the Battle Groups on the road to Lahore before anyone in Washington, Brussels, or Beijing has the chance to act."

    Cold Start is also aimed at paralysing Pakistani response. Although the operational details of Cold Start remain classified, it appears that the goal would be to have three to five Battle Groups entering Pakistani territory within 72 to 96 hours from the time the order to mobilize is issued.

    "Only such simultaneity of operations will unhinge the enemy, break his cohesion, and paralyze him into making mistakes from which he will not be able to recover," says Gurmeet Kanwal of India's Centre for Land Warfare Studies.

    Agrees Ladwig: "Multiple divisions operating independently have the potential to disrupt or incapacitate the Pakistani leadership's decision making cycle, as happened to the French high command in the face of the German blitzkrieg of 1940."

    Also, rather than seek to deliver a catastrophic blow to Pakistan (i.e., cutting the country in two), the goal of Indian military operations would be to make shallow territorial gains, 50-80 km deep, that could be used in post-conflict negotiations to extract concessions from Islamabad..

    Where the strike corps had the power to deliver a knockout blow, the division-sized Battle Groups can only "bite and hold" territory. This denies Pakistan the "regime survival" justification for employing nuclear weapons in response to India's conventional attack.

    CALLING THE NUCLEAR BLUFF
    To be sure, Pakistan has declared it has a very low nuclear threshold - that is Islamabad will launch nuclear strikes against India when a significant portion of its territory has been captured or is likely to be captured, or the Pakistani military machine suffers heavy losses.

    But this is just a myth - perpetuated and planted by US academia and think tanks, and is probably officially inspired. For, it suits the needs of the conservative American establishment in whose eyes India is a long-term rival and Pakistan a useful, if unreliable, ally. Unfortunately, India's political leadership and its uncritical media have been brainwashed into believing that Cold Start has apocalyptic consequences.

    But "nuclear warfare is not a commando raid or commando operation with which Pakistan is more familiar," says Dr Kapila. "Crossing the nuclear threshold is so fateful a decision that even strong American Presidents in the past have baulked at exercising it."

    Indeed, Pakistan cannot expect India would sit idle and suffer a Pakistani nuclear strike without a massive nuclear retaliation, which would be the end of the Pakistan story.

    PAKISTAN'S OPTIONS
    So where does that leave Pakistan? The wayward country is faced with the cold reality that India is prepared to undertake offensive operations against Pakistan without giving it time to bring diplomatic leverages into play.


    Since India has declared that it will not resort to a nuclear first strike, the onus is squarely on Pakistan and its patrons. A nuclear exchange between India and Pakistan has the potential to spiral out of control, sucking in China, the US, the Islamic countries and Russia. That would send the price of oil skyrocketing and cause a worldwide economic crisis.

    Therefore, "a nuclear conflict will take place in South Asia only if the United States wants it and lets Pakistan permissively cross the nuclear threshold," says Dr Kapila.

    Ralph Peters, the author of Looking for Trouble, and a strategic analyst for Fox News, agrees that the US needs to consider an alternative approach to handling "splintering, renegade" Pakistan. "Let India deal with Pakistan. Pakistan would have to behave responsibly at last. Or face nuclear-armed India. And Pakistan's leaders know full well that a nuclear exchange would leave their country a wasteland. India would dust itself off and move on," observes Peters.

    COLD SHOULDER BY INDIA'S POLITICIANS
    To be sure, Cold Start, though it has been war gamed five times, lacks consensus in India. That is mainly because the country's political leadership lacks the nerve to implement a strategy that could possibly lead to nuclear war. But that is precisely why India's generals brought it into the public realm. Cold Start was devised to end the standoff in the subcontinent. Pakistan cannot be allowed to export terror and brandish its nuclear weapons at India, ad infinitum.

    THE ULTIMATE WEAPON?
    The beauty of Cold Start is that it may never have to be used because it calls Pakistan's nuclear bluff at the outset, which is perhaps why the Pakistani generals are so agitated. Indeed, why should they be troubled at all if the Indian Army is saying goodbye to its old strategy of breaking up Pakistan?

    Ultimately, Cold Start may prove to be the Brahmastra - the Hindu God Brahma's doomsday weapon, never to be used but which keeps the enemy in perpetual shock and awe. India's military brass has come up with a solution for taming Pakistan; it is now up to the political leadership to bite the bullet, and the world to back it. As ancient India's master of statecraft Chanakya wrote in the Arthashastra 2300 years ago:

    The antidote of poison is poison, not nectar,
    The vicious are deaf to entreaties gentle,
    Meet the enemy on his own terms
    And batter his pretentions to dust.

    OpEdNews - Page 2 of Article: How India's Cold Start is Turning the Heat on Pakistan
     
  2. Naren1987

    Naren1987 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Some questions here,
    Why place the strike corps away from the border?
    Is the military Infrastructure alongside the border with Pakistan adequate?
    Is the army satisfied with the quality of its weapons(I believe they are obsolete)?, Most of our tanks lack Night vision, a high tech army is vital for this operation.
    Can Pakistan's cruise missiles destroy our airfields?
    We have to take the worst case scenario into account.

    And finally, why would Washington consider us a rival?
     
  3. RoYaN

    RoYaN Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Ok il give it my best try
    I am clueless on this one, but I think there is a reason why they were put there Oh!! JJ where are you?????
    For defence, old doctrine quite adequate but for cold start some work needs to be done
    Obsolete!No Could use some upgrades......
    80% no 20% may be.......
    We can never be 100% sure with missiles...
    No one is a permanent friend or enemy in diplomacy......
    USA cozzied up to china to help them with taking on the USSR . USA will take out or attempt to take out any one who gets too close to challenging them......
     
  4. flanker143

    flanker143 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    we are peace lovers....so we won't place strike corps near border.... so as to avoid upscaled tensions with pak and international flak .......

    agree with geoff....

    u always can't keep your weapons cutting edge and state of the art unless u have a $ 100bn++ defence budget......
    but our equipment isin't obselete also..... "tank lacking night vision" is a very old saying now only some foolish media ppl say it to criticize army , most of the t 72's have been updated and t90 and arjun already have night vision.....

    also nag , spyder and akash are being inducted ...... finsas , lch, arjun mk2 on their way !!

    we are on the verge of transforming into a very high tech army , by the end of this decade our might will be increased manifold (f-insas,fmbt,ficv)..... this decade will be very interesting ...u will see !! !!

    after the induction of ABM, akash mk1 & mk2, spyder........... impossible !!!!

    we will be quite immune to cruise as well as ballistic missiles....


    no nation has friends.....(has)only interests....... and US is no exception to this....
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2010
  5. chachachoudhary

    chachachoudhary Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Well written.
     
  6. RoYaN

    RoYaN Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Can never be 100% sure with missiles............
     
  7. Spartacus+

    Spartacus+ Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    This article is written from Indian point of view Mine is different
    To do large scale movement in double quick time as compared to 2002 is possible but you can't hide it, Intel will be available to Pakistan weeks before the start of cold start so enough time to mobilize our forces as well so cold start is not applicable.
    PAF can intercept any incoming bandit within 3 minutes.
    Every missile is not carrying nuclear warheads we can destroy all Indian strike groups with short range ballistic missiles. Like Abdali-1 range 180km and Ghaznaviu-290km cold start is bluff.
     
  8. flanker143

    flanker143 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    get this through your head buddy ....... Even a single "ballistic missile" launch will immediately escalate the conventional war into a nuclear war ...!!!

    Your launch will be replied with a barrage of missiles...!! God u were thinking of hitting us with a ballistic missile and them getting away with it.... !!

    Good god my brain hurts.......!!!
     
  9. Coltsfan

    Coltsfan <b>SENIOR MEMBER</b> SENIOR MEMBER

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    Ballistic missiile with a conventional warhead won't escalate into a nuclear war.

    India has a no first use policy, it is only Pakistan that will initiate a nuclear attack as a desperate measure and then Indian response will be overwhelming and result in obliteration of Pakistan.
     
  10. flanker143

    flanker143 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    i know india has a policy of no first use..

    but at the same time we won't wait to see mushroom clouds in the sky buddy !!

    a missile with a ballistic path will be a proof enough that a pakistan has struck us with nukes......
    suppose pak strikes us with ballistic missiles will we really wait to see that whether our cities have turned to ashes and we have lost our first strike capability and we can retaliate only with much reduced second strike capabilites........

    acccording to u india should only have nuke tipped missiles that are stored in silos.....then why india has missiles that are mostly launched from surface because according to u we will have to wait untill we are wiped out....
     
  11. Coltsfan

    Coltsfan <b>SENIOR MEMBER</b> SENIOR MEMBER

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    ok

    Factually incorrect, I think you are equating a ballistic missile launch with nuclear attack

    We have considered all that before deciding to go with the no first use policy. Do you think these are new hypothetical scenarios you are putting forth that no one else has considered?

    huh? I have no idea what you are talking about.
     
  12. DaRk KnIght

    DaRk KnIght Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    3 minutes claim link?? Till now only Maggie can be prepared in 3 minutes(official time 2 minutes ) :lol:
     
  13. flanker143

    flanker143 Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Well we all have different pov's.....
    I'll stick to mine.....but at the same time i hope that we never get a ans to this ques....
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2010
  14. RoYaN

    RoYaN Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Ballistic missile launch Will up the ante,but one can't really differentiate weather a ballistic missile is having a conventional or an nuclear missile

    Both posts are stretching it a bit on opposite sides but the reality is some were in between.....
     
  15. veteran

    veteran 2nd Lieutant ELITE MEMBER

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    1. Strike corps are never placed alongside border, they are used as a thrust against enemy. alongside the border the strike field formations are deployed. strike corps are located in such a way that they can cover any zone with in their area with equal amount of time.

    2. yes indeed. Indian army has given it equal importance and yes we are on right track. Indian army has the capability of mobilizing its troops under any given scenario. Indian army is not going to disclose that how they are going to do their business. we have more than sufficient infrastructure along the western border.

    3.you say they are obsolete, okay i can understand. however when was the last time you saw an infantry soldier in full combat gear??insurgency operations are operated with different strategy. Kargill was a long way back so no need to bring it in here. things have changed chap. yes we are in the process of modernizing our troops but we need to be patient.

    4. i agree but the number is very small, up gradation has been going on for a while and it is under process. The armored regiments are the backbone. from last few years Indian army has given a lot of efforts to ensure that our armored core is up to the mark.

    5. That is not easy, although it seems so. we have our very secretive countermeasures to thwart any attempt by our enemies.
     
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