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Huawei is world's top telecom supplier | TelecomsTech

Discussion in 'China & Asia Pacific' started by Martian, Jan 22, 2017.

  1. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Huawei's Mate 10 phones have big screens, small bezels, and AI hardware
    54
    by Sam Byford@345triangle Oct 16, 2017, 9:00am EDT SHARE

    [​IMG]Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
    Huawei has announced the Mate 10 and Mate 10 Pro, two new phones that occupy the highest end of its lineup. The Mate 10 phones see the Chinese giant get on board with the skinny-bezel trend of 2017 while leveraging its ability in silicon design to supposedly improve AI-related performance.

    The main difference between the two phones is in screen size and shape. The Mate 10 features a 5.9-inch 2560 x 1440 LCD while the Mate 10 Pro’s display is a 6-inch 2160 x 1080 OLED; both have thin, symmetrical bezels at the top and bottom. The Pro feels like the smaller phone, however, due to the narrower 18:9 aspect ratio it shares with many of this year’s similarly sized “bezel-less” phones.

    The regular Mate 10’s sharper 16:9 screen makes for an unusually proportioned device, albeit one that’ll probably work well for YouTube and other casual video watching — it feels very wide in the hand, but the combination of a huge, standard aspect ratio screen with slim bezels lends a distinctive heft.

    [​IMG]Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
    Both phones feature glossy glass construction and come in “mocha brown” or “pink gold,” with additional black and gold finishes for the Mate 10 and blue and gray colorways for the Pro. There’s also a Porsche Design special edition Mate 10 Pro with a “diamond black” finish. The Mate 10 is 8.2mm thick and has a fingerprint sensor below the screen; the Pro is 7.9mm and has its fingerprint sensor around the back. The Pro features IP67 waterproofing and an IR blaster, while the Mate 10 gets a headphone jack and a microSD card slot in return.

    Samsung’s DeX, which in turn is similar in concept to Windows Continuum and the Motorola Atrix and a lot of other things that didn't work out. Huawei’s spin doesn’t require a dock, however — you can plug your phone directly into a monitor with a cable and expect to get around three hours of use in the desktop environment, which features resizable windows and Office support. The system allows you to use your phone as normal while it’s powering the larger monitor, and there are privacy controls that allow you to stop notifications from popping up.

    [​IMG]Photo by Vlad Savov / The Verge
    But the biggest differentiator for Huawei this year is the Kirin 970 chip, developed in-house at the company’s HiSilicon semiconductor arm. The Kirin 970 includes what Huawei is calling an NPU, or neural processing unit, which is designed to handle tasks related to AI and deep learning. Apple announced much the same with the iPhone 8 and X’s A11 Bionic chip, which includes a “neural engine,” but Huawei is leaning harder into making the Kirin 970’s NPU a core feature of the device.

    came with some disappointing quirks, and the company’s claims about the Mate 10 require that we reserve judgement even further. On paper, though, Huawei’s latest are intriguing devices that carry a lot of potential.

    Huawei has set European pricing at €699 ($824) for the Mate 10, €799 ($942) for the Mate 10 Pro, and a staggering yet unsurprising $1,395 ($1,645) for the Porsche Design Mate 10 Pro — the release date hasn’t been announced yet, nor have any plans for a US launch.
     
  2. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Huawei has dispatched 100 million phones this year
    https://www.gsmarena.com/huawei_has_dispatched_100_million_phones_this_year-news-27883.php
    Ivan 24 October 2017

    Huawei

    Huawei has shipped more than 100 million phones in the first three quarters of 2017, marking a very impressive 19% increase over the same period last year.

    In the period from January to September Huawei managed to beat Apple's shipments to become the second smartphone vendor in the world, behind Samsung.

    [​IMG]
    Huawei ships a lot of phones in all price groups and under a few different brands. The low to mid-priced Nova smartphones as well as the mid to upper range Honor brands are both part of Huawei.

    Thanks to its strong shipments Huawei's operating revenue for the first three quarters has increased 30% year over year.

    Also, Huawei's retail partners have reached the impressive 42,300 count globally.
     
  3. InfoWarrior

    InfoWarrior Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    :facepalm: Anthill frustration :angry:
     
  4. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Don't worry , be happy!

    https://vadakkus.com/2017/10/24/indias-chinese-smartphone-market/



    If you have noticed, the Indian smartphone market is today dominated by Chinese brands. If you are about to say “Samsung”, better hold it in. As of today, September 2017, China’s BBK electronics is now India’s largest smartphone manufacturer with 22% market share, pushing Samsung with 18.4% to the second place for the first time. Well, if you were to consider individual brands, Samsung still tops, though that might not last long as Xiaomi (shao-me) is snapping at its heels with 16.8% market share. Most people will probably not have heard of BBK Electronics, but they would certainly have heard of the brands they own, the ubiquitous Oppo, Vivo and One Plus, which together own a quarter of Indian smartphone space. There were no branded Chinese phones in India in 2012, and in 2017, there are almost no phones other than Chinese ones! In a space of 5 years, Chinese phones have managed to not just capture the market, but to change the perception about Chinese phones and products in general. It won’t be long before the Indian smartphone market will be reduced to Chinese brands battling each other for supremacy. How did this happen? How did Chinese phones come from being outcasts, seen as cheap, toxic unbranded throwaways to dominating the market? It is an inspiring and interesting story, which came from an unlikely source: Indian smartphone brands, especially Micromax.

    [​IMG]

    What About Indian Brands?
    Wrong question. It should be, “What Indian brands?” The Indian smartphone market at the beginning of the post-Nokia era was marked by expensive Samsung, Sony and HTC Androids in addition to Apple, when Micromax introduced the Canvas 2, the first dual-core smartphone that sold under Rs.10000, a psychological price point for Indians, changing the Indian smartphone market forever. In just a year had cornered 22% of the Indian smartphone market share through cost arbitrage and slick marketing. Micromax, unlike today’s leaders, manufactured nothing on their own. They bought large numbers of white-labelled smartphones from BBK and others in Shenzhen and resold them under the Micromax brand. Aided by savings in overheads, logistics and bulk-purchase could severely undercut Samsung and others in the pricing department, literally flooded the Indian market with budget smartphones of passable quality, drastically lowering prices and increasing smartphone penetration levels. Micromax also was the first brand to focus on online sales, which would save them even more. Inspired by Micromax, a number of other Indian brands like Lava, Karbonn, Intex etc., sprung up following the same business model. And this was where we faltered. Only 3 years ago, in 2014, Micromax was exactly where BBK is today, on the throne of the Indian smartphone market with 22% market share. Today, it is a measly 3.3%. Micromax’s story is a case study on corporate rise and fall.

    The success of Micromax made Chinese manufacturers, who were looking for new markets in the wake of the saturation of their home and western markets, sit up and take notice. Recognising the untapped potential of the Indian smartphone market, they decided to replicate tried and tested strategies at home to capture the Indian market. Chinese OEMs then branded and started selling their phones themselves instead of selling to Micromax, double-undercutting Indian brands to obscurity. Utilising their already available component manufacturing and assembly facilities, Chinese brands, Lenovo, Moto, Huawei, Xiaomi, LeEco, CoolPad, ZTE, Honor, Oppo, Vivo, OnePlus etc. started flooding the Indian market. They also took the e-commerce route to sell their products with exclusive tie-ups with either Amazon or Flipkart, increasing their allure through exclusivity, helping them to corner a large share of the image-and quality conscious crowd while also doing away with a lot of overheads. In just two years, had all but taken over the Indian market, just like they took over the world. They had taken’s Micromax’s game to its own doorstep, then beat it by taking it to the next level.

    Back in 2013, I suddenly found a lot of my colleagues suddenly get excited about something called “One Plus One”. I was utterly confused why everyone was suddenly practising addition tables. Apparently, there was a pre-launch by invitation for a new smartphone brand featuring a mind-blowing configuration of 3 GB of RAM, 64GB ROM, the then-most powerful Snapdragon 801 quad-core processor, and an enormous full-HD display and 13MP camera for an unbelievable price of Rs.22,000! The Samsung Galaxy S5 which could be considered its direct Korean competitor at the time was selling for Rs.43,250 at the time, at double the price! The S5 was launched for Rs.51,500. Samsung and the others had no choice but keep reducing their prices. The S5 now retails at a whimpering Rs.14,000. With its online-only strategy, One Plus had captured the image and feature conscious crowd who had more money to spend for high-level specifications. The success of OnePlus was that by going the online-only route, it could afford to sell its phones at rock-bottom prices.
    However, none of these brands are as successful as the BBK brands. Oppo has taken over the student and the price-conscious customer segment, Vivo mostly the home and middle-class community and OnePlus the image, tech and quality conscious segment. Oppo and Vivo have gone overboard with their marketing, plastering India’s towns and cities with their respective green or blue signage boards. The highlight of their strategy in India is that while Samsung and LG wear their Korean heritage on their sleeves, Sony is synonymous with Japanese quality, you can hardly ever see any reference to the Chinese heritage of the BBK brands. In fact, a lot of people wouldn’t believe me when I told them these brands were Chinese, as they didn’t exactly match the image of a “China phone”. However, the success of these brands was that they read the Indian market better than anyone else. They delivered healthy looking phones with reasonable performance, good cameras, large displays and 4G, and above all, reliability and good service options at a price 20% lower than the established competition. And, the phones are quite good!

    And to ensure that their products moved off the shelves, they presented retailers and distributors with heavy margins – up to 15% on occasions – to push their products, in addition to a variety of goodies from two-wheelers to foreign trips. I guess my retailer guy was one sale short of a Shanghai trip. With such salesmen, no other brand stands a chance, I thought. They literally brute-forced their way to the top, demolishing any competition. Even then, Indian brands never stood a chance because they were literally procuring their goods from the competition. For all intents and purposes, would only be a reseller for Oppo, selling the same phones at higher prices. In addition, they made a string of bad business calls and had a messy intra-company spat, but that is beyond the point.

    The point is that economic power will always end up resting with those who can create or produce goods of intrinsic value. Only if you can make something of value that can be sold to an audience will you survive, else, if your business solely runs on gimmicks, repackaging, undercutting, support functions etc., you will be replaced or displaced sooner or later, just like Micromax got displaced by the OEMs whose phones they were reselling. China thrives in today’s world because they create everything and their components, and the only way Indian brands could’ve survived was by creating the entire supply chain industry to build smartphones, which was impossible. The story of the smartphone industry is also a lesson for the Indian IT industry, which thrived only on cost arbitrage, or because we offer services at cheaper rates than others. It won’t last.

    P.S.: Yes, BBK makes in India, but that hardly makes any difference. Overall, their “Make in India” comes across as a strategy to get around policy tangles and to position its products as “Indian”. They only assemble their phones in India, and the factories, processes, intellectual capital, profits etc are all fully owned by them. In fact, this only makes us only more dependent on the Chinese economy. We have nothing to gain from this unless we adopt the technology here and start producing things ourselves.
     
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  5. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    China's First Gen6 Flexible AMOLED Production Line Put Into Mass Production

    BOE leading the development of global new display industry
    https://www.prnewswire.com/news-rel...-line-put-into-mass-production-300543853.html
    NEWS PROVIDED BY

    BOE Technology Group Co., Ltd.
    Oct 26, 2017, 07:00 ET

    SHARE THIS ARTICLE


    CHENGDU, China, Oct. 26, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- On October 26, China's first Gen6 flexible AMOLED line - BOE Chengdu Gen6 flexible AMOLED production line has put into mass production in advance. The production line is built by BOE Technology Group Co., Ltd, a global leader in semiconductor display industry as well as an IoT technologies, products and services supplier. The production line's mass production and products delivery indicate that Chinese enterprises begin to lead the development of the global AMOLED industry in the new display era.

    [​IMG]
    BOE flexible AMOLED display panel
    In recent years, Chinese enterprises are accelerating their layouts in new display areas, becoming a crucial base of the global semiconductor display industry. As a leading figure of global semiconductor display industry, BOE built Chengdu Gen6 flexible AMOLED production line, which is China's first full flexible AMOLED line, as well as the world's second Gen6 flexible AMOLED line that has put into mass production. The line adopts the world's most advanced evaporation technology and thin film encapsulation technology, making it possible for the display panels to be curved, bendable and foldable.

    It is said that BOE Chengdu Gen6 flexible AMOLED production line mainly produces display panels used in mobile terminal products, smart wearable devices and other display products. On the mass production ceremony, BOE delivers its flexible AMOLED display panels to more than ten customers including Huawei, OPPO, vivo, Xiaomi, ZTE and Nubia, enabling more possibilities for future application innovation.

    In the flexible AMOLED field, in addition to BOE Chengdu Gen6 flexible AMOLED line that has put into mass production, BOE's other Gen6 flexible AMOLED line in Mianyang will be put into operation in 2019.

    BOE Chief Executive Officer Chen Yanshun said: "BOE has always been providing customers with more innovative, competitive products and solutions. The smooth mass production of Chengdu Gen6 flexible AMOLED line will greatly enhance the company's comprehensive competitiveness in high-performance mobile phones, mobile displays and other products, so as to meet the market's growing demands for small and medium-sized high-performance display products, which is of epoch-making significance for accelerating development of Chinese OLED industry and global flexible display industry."

    About BOE

    Founded in April 1993, BOE Technology Group Co., Ltd. is an IoT company providing intelligent interface products and services for information interaction and human health, as well as a leading company in global semiconductor display industry. BOE's three core businesses are Display and Sensor Devices, Smart Systems and Healthcare Services. In the first half of 2017, BOE's new-patent applications exceeded 4,000. In total, BOE has over 55,000 usable patents, ranking among the top of the industry. Data from IFI Claims also shows that BOE has ranked 40th among the Top 50 United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Patent Assignees in 2016. According to the market data as of 2017 Q3, BOE's global market share of TFT-LCD panels for mobile phone, tablet and notebook ranks No.1, panels for monitor and TV ranks No.2.
     
  6. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Huawei's ultra high-end 'Porsche' smartphone sells for $5,000 online as demand soars

    http://www.asiaone.com/china/huawei...che-smartphone-sells-5000-online-demand-soars


    Scalpers who expected to rake in huge profits from the sale of Apple's iPhone X may think twice as prices of Huawei Technologies new ultra-high-end smartphone soared to dizzying heights as of Wednesday and made it one of the most expensive models on sale in the country.

    Prices for the Chinese company's Porsche Design Huawei Mate 10, priced at 8,999 yuan (S$1,839), rose to around 20,000 yuan in the country's leading online platforms of JD.com and Taobao.com, with the highest price peaking at 26,999 yuan (S$5,519).

    [​IMG]
     
  7. RMFAN

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    Huawei's Mate 10 Pro is a high-end alternative to Samsung, Apple devices

    Saheli Roy Choudhury | @sahelirc
    Published 8:39 PM ET Wed, 22 Nov 2017 Updated 14 Hours Ago
    • The Mate 10 Pro has a really powerful battery, a top-notch camera and several other useful features
    • Huawei's newest phone features its Kirin 970 chipset, which supports artificial intelligence
    • But the device does not come with a headphone jack, expandable storage or wireless charging

    https://www.cnbc.com/2017/11/22/huawei-mate-10-pro-review-a-solid-high-end-smartphone.html


    [​IMG]

    Chinese smartphone giant Huawei has not been shy about its ambition to dethrone Samsung and Apple to become the top smartphone vendor in the world. While Huawei is still seen as a bit of an outsider, particularly in the U.S., its new flagship Mate 10 Series smartphones could change the game for the company.

    Huawei provided me with a review unit of the Mate 10 Pro smartphone for a week. Launched in October and made available earlier this month, the phone is the higher-end version of the flagship Mate 10.


    There were certain features I really liked, and that particularly goes for the long battery life, which means you probably won't have to carry a power bank on you to get through the day.

    There were also a few things I didn't like, but more on that later. Let's start with what you should know about the Mate 10 Pro, if you're shopping for a new smartphone this Christmas.

    The dual glass and metal body
    The Mate 10 Pro looks and feels like a solid high-end phone with a dual glass body around an aluminum frame that feels great in your hands. But the back and front glass makes the phone very prone to fingerprint smudges — so having a microfiber cleaning cloth is handy.

    It is also a pretty big phone, featuring a 6-inch screen. One-handed navigation was an issue for me because I have small hands. But Huawei provides a way around it: If you swipe your finger over the navigation bar at the bottom, it activates a mini screen that allows comfortable, one-handed browsing. To go back to full screen mode, you'll need to tap on the gray area again.

    If the feature isn't automatically activated, it can be accessed under settings and inside the smart assistance tab.
     
  8. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Vodafone and Huawei live trial extends range of pre-standard 5G in Milan
    [​IMG]
    Posted by ZENOBIA HEGDENOVEMBER 24, 2017
    0
    https://www.iot-now.com/2017/11/24/...ve-trial-extends-range-pre-standard-5g-milan/

    Vodafone and Huawei have completed a trial on a full end-to-end (E2E) network of a technique to improve the range of high frequency spectrum that can in future be used to deliver 5G to its customers. Italy’s Ministry for Economic Development has made frequencies available to Vodafone so that it can trial pre-standard 5G in Milan. An E2E test network has been built for that purpose.

    High frequency bands can connect many users at the same time, but broadcast over a more limited distance than lower frequencies. However, Vodafone, working with Huawei, has pioneered a new approach to improve the coverage range of that high frequency spectrum.

    Instead of using a single frequency band to communicate between a smartphone and the network, the two telecoms companies tested using different frequency bands for downlink and uplink transmissions.

    The downlink is used to receive data from the network – like news read on a smartphone – and the uplink is used to send data through the network – like emails or posts on social media.

    The trials compared two scenarios using Vodafone’s 5G test network sending Gigabits of data. In scenario one, the same high frequency band was used for both the downlink and uplink. In scenario two, a high frequency band was used for the downlink, while a low frequency band was used for the uplink.

    This capability — known technically as uplink & downlink decoupling — is currently being standardised by 3GPP, a leading organisation through which industry-wide standards are agreed for the implementation of new telecoms technology.

    Vodafone measured up to a 10 decibel coverage range improvement in the uplink when also utilising the low band. That means that using the technique, customers would get a stronger signal even in areas where 5G coverage is limited.[​IMG]

    Francisco Martin, head of Radio Product for Vodafone Group, said: “This test of pre-standard 5G uplink and downlink decoupling will help us to deploy the technology efficiently to support our customers as soon as we launch services.”

    Yang Chaobin, president of Huawei 5G product line, said: “With the acceleration of the 3GPP 5G standard, the first phase of 3GPP Release 15 is expected to be completed by the end of this year, and it will support eMBB application that will bring significant improvement to user experience and even greater enhancement to capacity.

    Huawei and Vodafone have successfully completed the verification of the uplink and downlink decoupling solution based on the end-to-end 5G network, including RAN, core network and terminals. Huawei will jointly work with industry partners and make 5G a global success.”

    Vodafone expects to launch 5G services in 2020, in markets where it has appropriate spectrum, once the standard is agreed by 3GPP and compatible telecoms equipment and devices are available.
     
  9. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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  10. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    LG U+ and Huawei Successfully Demonstrate 5G Dual-Connectivity Technology

    http://www.marketwired.com/press-re...e-5g-dual-connectivity-technology-2240478.htm

    SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA--(Marketwired - Nov 13, 2017) - LG U+ and Huawei have successfully completed 'Dual-Connectivity' technology verification during a 5G field test in Seoul. 'Dual-Connectivity' technology provides a 20Gbps downlink rate by linking a 3.5GHz base station with a 28GHz base station. This verification showcases a major achievement made by LG U+ and Huawei in 5G joint innovation.

    Field verification of 5G 'Dual-Connectivity' technology saw the terminal simultaneously connected to 3.5GHz and 28GHz base stations, and receiving data from the two base stations, providing a significant increase in single-user rate. The verification was conducted through cooperation between two base stations at a LG U+ 5G test base in Seoul, and it was confirmed that the downlink data from both the 3.5GHz base station and the 28GHz base station was combined to provide a rate of around 20Gbps.

    'Dual-connectivity' is a technique that allows multiple base stations to transmit data simultaneously or alternately to a user so that they can seamlessly communicate with other users when moving between base stations. 'Dual-Connectivity' technology is suitable for use between 5G 3.5GHz base stations and 28GHz base stations and can also be used between 4G and 5G base stations.

    Previously, LG U+ has used a laboratory environment to verify 'Dual-Connectivity' technology between 4G base stations. This time LG U+ and Huawei successfully completed the verification between 5G base stations, and also set up a foundation for future 4G-5G 'Dual-Connectivity' in a 4G-5G heterogeneous network.

    Kim Dae Hee, Managing Director of LG U+ 5G Strategy, said, "By demonstrating 'Dual-Connectivity' technology, which will play a key role in multi-operation of 4G and 5G wireless base stations, we will develop various next-generation technologies to provide a 5G service."

    LG U+ and Huawei will continue to carry out 5G technical cooperation and verification, to meet the arrival of the commercial launch of 5G.
     
  11. RMFAN

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    5G is a golden opportunity for Chinese OEMs

    FEATURES
    [​IMG]by Robert Triggs3 weeks ago

    https://www.androidauthority.com/5g-chinese-oems-810851/


    5G mobile networks are going to open up new experiences and possibilities for the Internet of Things (IoT), media businesses, and consumers. It also represents a major opportunity for infrastructure developers, researchers, and manufacturers. China is looking to play a major part in the development of 5G, with a number of its biggest companies heavily involved in standards and testing.



    This situation is quite different from the development of the early 4G LTE standard, which was predominantly overseen by Japanese, South Korean and legacy telecommunications companies like Ericsson, Nokia, Samsung, SK Telecom, Qualcomm, and LG U+, among others. There are more than 800,000 industry standards in the world, yet only 2 percent are internationally agreed upon, partly due to the difficulties in agreeing to rules across different legal systems. China accounts for less than 0.2 percent of these standards, and neither Huawei or ZTE are among the top 10 4G IP owners.


    My inkling would be that the more robust legal systems, along with a long background in many technical industries, have historically favoured standard development in Western markets. China perhaps feels that it has been left out or stuck working with technologies devised by others. However, it’s clear that more active participation is going to be required if the Communist Party of China wants to realize its goal of becoming a global tech innovator.



    Driving 5G development


    Today, a wide range of Chinese telecommunication companies are working on the 5G (IMT 2020) standard and the accompanying radio technologies. Huawei and ZTE, two of China’s biggest mobile and telecom companies, are leading research into commercial 5G and stocking up on intellectual property. ZTE has submitted more than 4,000 international proposals concerning 3GPP 5G New Radio (NR) since January 2016, and obtained three editor seats in key 5G specifications. The company is also taking a leading role in the world’s 5G testing, carrying out field tests with China Mobile and China Unicom this year, SoftBank in Japan, as well as working with Qualcomm, Baidu, and other industry players.

    Huawei is similarly embedded in development, research, and testing of 5G networks with other partners. The company has demonstrated 5G-based remote driving with China Mobile and SAIC Motor, 39 MHz mmWave radio technology with NTT DOCOMO in Japan. It’s also partnered with Deutsche Telekom to test Europe’s first 5G connection. Huawei is working closely with Intel on New Radio testing to mature essential new short-range radio technologies. These companies aren’t just operating in China, they’re working closely with global partners to solve 5G problems.

    LexInnova Technologies, a US consulting firm in the United States, estimated that China owned about 10 per cent of the “5G-essential” intellectual property rights relating to radio access, modulation and core networking. Huawei owns the largest amount of related IP in China, followed by ZTE. 5G infrastructure spending by China’s three network operators, China Mobile, China Unicom, and China Telecom, is also forecast to reach $180 billion over a seven year period. For comparison, US carriers invested $117 billion with the roll-out of their 4G infrastructure, and Japan is expected to spend only $46 billion on 5G outlay over the same period.

    Beyond phones in the world’s largest market


    It’s not surprising China is making such large investments into 5G – the country is the world’s largest smartphone and carrier market by subscribers, followed by India and then the US. Market research firm CCS Insight anticipates there will be more than 1 billion 5G users online by 2023. Half of them will likely be based in China.

    Huawei and ZTE may be leading China’s investment into 5G technologies, but they are handset manufacturers too, operating in the world’s largest phone market. Huawei holds the top spot in the country, outside of the BBK Electronics group, and also has its fabless semiconductor arm – HiSilicon – to design SoCs for its phones.


    Being able to design their own chips while working on back-end technology is going to be advantageous when transitioning over to 5G. Qualcomm and Samsung are afforded similar opportunities as SoC and networking developers. HiSilicon is also one of the largest fabless SoC designers in China, selling products across the display & video, home networking, surveillance camera, and even the smart home and set-top TV markets. 5G is going to bring many of these areas even closer together, leaving HiSilicon in a strong position.



    This isn’t to say that Huawei and HiSilicon are the only companies capable of providing the hardware for the huge range of 5G powered products. Qualcomm, for example, is broadening its portfolio to cater to connected audio, smartphone home, and automotive platforms. However, with Qualcomm facing regulatory battles across Asia regarding modem technologies, there may be room for some homegrown talent in China and perhaps elsewhere. Qualcomm was fined $773 million in Taiwan this year, following a $865 million case in Korea in December 2016, and a $975 million fine from the Chinese National Development and Reform Commission back in 2015.



    EDITOR'S PICK

    The biggest companies in China’s Silicon Valley
    In the world of smartphones, we're becoming more and more used to Chinese technology companies competing with popular global brands, but we also know that the pendulum doesn't necessarily swing both ways. The Chinese government's "Great …


    5G isn’t just about hardware, it will also enable new connected use cases across consumer and enterprise markets. Back in Febuary 2016, China Mobile jointly launched its 5G Innovation Centre, focusing on IoT, the Internet of Vehicles, industrial internet, cloud robotics, and VR/AR. China’s Alibaba, Baidu, and Tencent are working on 5G enabled autonomous driving, entertainment, cloud services, and other areas, with timetables in place for when these services will be viable.



    The country’s government is heavily involved in promoting development too, the Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology and the Ministry of Transport are promoting a 5G standard for connected and autonomous cars based on previous tests in the country. A head start here could see some of these products and services appear around the world following the launch of 5G.


    Wrap Up


    The road to, and roll-out of, 5G will require a lot of input from companies all around the globe. Unlike with the development of 4G and the country’s own TD-SCDMA 3G standard, Chinese companies are right in the midst of major global development efforts, alongside familiar telecommunications and equipment designers from South Korea and the US.



    China is a relative latecomer to developing global standards, but the country’s technology industry has undergone major shifts and growth over the past decade. With serious financial investment, capabilities to bring products to market, and the backing of its government, Chinese technology companies seem poised to have a major influence on this next-generation wireless standard.
     
  12. mirage

    mirage 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    ni zhen me le ? wsm ma ren zheli ? ?????????????? ni reng ran zai ni de ji xian . dong le ma ?????????????? zhege bu shi bajistan de de pdf .
     
  13. RMFAN

    RMFAN Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Report: Samsung to Lose Market Share in Chinese Smartphone Market in Q4 2017

    https://www.xda-developers.com/samsung-lose-market-share-china-q4-2017/
    Chinese smartphone market is currently led by Huawei, followed by Oppo, Vivo, Xiaomi and Apple. Samsung is not in the top five smartphone manufacturers in the market, as the company has been struggling for a while in the country.

    Chinese OEMs like Oppo and Vivo have outperformed Samsung in offline retail sales, while Xiaomi retains its dominance in online flash sales, squeezing out Samsung from both ends. What makes the situation worse is that in the premium price segment, consumers in China prefer smartphones released by Huawei or Apple instead of Samsung’s flagships like the Galaxy S8.

    In Q3, Samsung ranked ninth in China, the world’s largest smartphone market, according to a report by the research firm. It had 2% share, which was significantly behind Huawei’s market share as the leader, and Apple’s market share in fifth position. Huawei and Apple are the two major global competitors for Samsung, and both of them are ahead of the company in China by a wide margin.

    This situation is not going to improve soon for the company. In fact, it is predicted to get worse. A new report by Strategy Analytics states that Samsung’s market share in the Chinese smartphone market will drop to below 2% in Q4 2017.

    The report predicts that Samsung’s market share will further drop to 1.6% in Q4. The company was once the dominant player in China with 20% market share, but its share of the market has gradually declined over the years with the rise of Huawei, Xiaomi, Oppo and Vivo. The report mentions that the combined share of these four companies stood at 66% during Q3, though the figure is “predicted to decline to 57.3% in [Q4] due to Apple’s upcoming iPhone X”.

    It is also worth noting that Samsung has cut around 20,000 jobs in China over the past two years. The company also replaced the head of its Chinese unit in Spring amid weak sales.

    On the other hand, Samsung’s arch rival Apple was the only foreign brand in the top five in China, according to the report. The company had 7.2% market share in Q3 but the report mentions that the figure is expected to rise to 10.7% in Q4 due to the iPhone X.

    Our take is that in order to recover in the Chinese smartphone market, Samsung will have to launch new products with affordable prices in the budget end to take the fight to Xiaomi. In the mid-range, it would need to outspend and outclass Oppo and Vivo’s marketing programs in offline retail. Finally, in the high-end, the company would have to use all its energy and resources on convincing consumers in China to choose Samsung flagship smartphones over their Huawei and Apple-branded competitors.
     

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