Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

IAF Jaguar DARIN-III Flies With New AESA Radar

Discussion in 'Indian Air Force' started by Gessler, Aug 10, 2017.

  1. Sancho

    Sancho Lt. Colonel Technical Analyst

    Joined:
    May 3, 2011
    Messages:
    5,591
    Likes Received:
    3,394
    Really? Which radar does the C/D MS20 have, which was the first fighter that got Meteor integrated and operational? Just as EF partners have integrated Meteor to Captor M, till radar 2 is ready. Only because RBE2 PESA was bad, doesn't mean other non AESA radars were too.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2017
  2. Picdelamirand-oil

    Picdelamirand-oil Lt. Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Messages:
    8,275
    Likes Received:
    6,246
    Country Flag:
    France
    PS-05/A Mark 4 is marginally better on range that RBE2 PESA, but it's not enough to take full advantage of Meteor.
     
  3. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2011
    Messages:
    13,805
    Likes Received:
    15,574
    Country Flag:
    India
    HTFE-40 without reheat will offer 5KN of additional thrust to Jags compared to present power plant.
     
    Sathya likes this.
  4. Sathya

    Sathya Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2016
    Messages:
    831
    Likes Received:
    830
    Country Flag:
    India
    will the additional 5 kn satisfy the optimum level required for the increased weight load and power requirements ?
     
  5. vstol jockey

    vstol jockey Colonel MILITARY STRATEGIST

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2011
    Messages:
    13,805
    Likes Received:
    15,574
    Country Flag:
    India
    The F125 from Honeywell is 43KN wet thrust.
     
    Sathya likes this.
  6. lca-fan

    lca-fan Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2015
    Messages:
    2,375
    Likes Received:
    4,766
    Country Flag:
    India
    When British Thanked India for Killing its own HF-73 Program for Jaguars
    Published August 18, 2017 SOURCE: Anand SG / FOR MY TAKE / IDRW.ORG
    [​IMG]

    Recently 70’s era Anglo-French Designed Jaguar Deep Penetration Strike aircraft belonging to Indian Air Force took the made headlines when it took off from HAL Owned Bangalore airport with Next Generation ELTA-2052 Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) Fire Control Radar (FCR), thus becoming the first aircraft in IAF’s Inventory to be equipped with AESA FCR . India is the lone operator of Jaguar’s in the world and was part of small group of Six countries which operated them and saw construction of only 543 aircraft which means nearly 30% of that totalling 160 units were procured by Indian Air force but that came at great price, since India had to kill its own HF-73 Program to make a case for purchase of Jaguar Strike aircraft from Britain. HF-73 was a derivate of HF-24 which HAL had developed in response to IAF’s requirement for Deep Penetration Strike Aircraft (DPSA) and was heavily optimised to handle Air-to-Ground operations. Production variant of HF-73 was to be powered by more powerful Rolls Royce RB-199-34R engines while it retained its original airframe but saw major changes in the fuselage, Air intakes and centre wing section. The cockpit was modified for better visibility. With an Increased fuel carrying capacity combat radius of HF-73 was said to be double that of HF-24. HF-73 had comparable Bomb carriage capability of Jaguars and also had the same level of combat range and capability, similarities were so much that British were pretty much convinced that India is not going to procure Jaguar Strike aircraft from them and had not given clearance for supply of its Rolls Royce RB-199-34R engines to India due to which HAL had to use older engines leading to a crash of its lone Prototype which was blamed on an engine failure . Reworked Program schedules along with configuration to use older engines in production models were not acceptable to the Indian Air Force and program work was thus discontinued and it seemed IAF was much pretty much convinced that Jaguar could do the job even though aircraft was clearly short of its requirements under trials and had limited combat capabilities. When IAF and Government officials reached Britan to negotiate for the purchase of Jaguar Strike Aircraft, British officials in a very candid admission said that ” They were surprised by Indian decision to kill its own HF-73 program and even thanked them for buying Jaguar aircraft instead”. India agreed to buy 40 Jaguar’s built in Britain and another 120 were to be license built back home in HAL Plant in India. Jaguar was never designed as Deep Penetration Strike Aircraft but due to its air frame design which incorporated excellent low-level flying characters, Indian air force and HAL spent nearly a decade or more in perfecting and improving Jaguar’s Air-to-Ground capabilities to turn it into a Strike aircraft they wanted to meet their Deep Penetration Strike Aircraft (DPSA) requirements .

    http://idrw.org/when-british-thanke...ts-own-hf-73-program-for-jaguars/#more-145122 .
     
  7. HariPrasad

    HariPrasad Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2016
    Messages:
    672
    Likes Received:
    615
    Country Flag:
    India

    Let us make a new plane out of Jaguar by twining it. Modify the wigs and put some fighting prowess into it.
     
    Sahil ecclstone likes this.
  8. lca-fan

    lca-fan Major SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2015
    Messages:
    2,375
    Likes Received:
    4,766
    Country Flag:
    India
    India Jaguar fighters face upgrade challenges
    Published August 20, 2017 SOURCE: Defensenews.com
    [​IMG]

    The Indian Air Force’s British-made Jaguar aircraft completed its maiden flight last week after integrating an advanced active electronically scanned array radar, but service officials say the Jaguar upgrade program is moving slowly and that there’s uncertainty regarding the mounting of proposed new engines. The upgrade program of the Jaguar fighter, undertaken by India’s state-owned Hindustan Aeronautics Limited, includes mounting new engines from Honeywell of the U.S., but an executive with HAL said it’s ”still awaiting the go-ahead from the Indian Air Force for the new engines.” “Not only is the upgrade program slow, but the autopilots on the Jaguar aircraft are malfunctioning,” the IAF official said. Furthermore, only 18 autopilot systems out of a required 108 could be integrated on Jaguar aircraft, according to a second Air Force official. India contracted the purchase of 35 autopilots from Thales of France on the Jaguar, which were received between December 2006 and January 2008. Due to contractual restrictions, HAL could integrate only 18 out of the 35 autopilots up until March 2017. And the autopilots installed on the aircraft are functioning at a suboptimal level because a vital component ? the Auto Pilot Electronic Unit, which maintains the flight path of the aircraft ? required repairs by Thales, which are expected to be completed in 7 to 26 months. The HAL executive placed blame: ”Upgrade of autopilot has been slow because of delays in supplies by French defense companies.” The Jaguar with the new AESA radar made its maiden flight Aug. 10, but the Air Force will carry out six more tests before induction. The AESA radar were bought from Elta of Israel as part of the Jaguar upgrade program. The new-generation radar will help in the simultaneous detection of multiple targets and also in the release of missiles to counter threats. The current AESA radars are designed for easy retrofit in field conditions with minimum disturbance to the aircraft, the HAL executive noted. Currently, the Indian Air Force is the only air force using the Jaguar, and HAL is therefore the only original equipment manufacturer able to maintain and upgrade the aircraft. The ongoing program will involve 59 Jaguars that have a DARIN I radar and upgrade them to the DARIN III standard, which will include the fitting of the AESA radar. The program also includes several missile-carrying capabilities as well as avionics upgrades that are expected to extend the aircraft’s life to 2050. (The initial phase out of the aircraft will begin in 2035, and it will be fully phased out by 2050.) The upgrade is expected to include replacing the Rolls-Royce ADOUR 811 engine with new F125N engines from Honeywell, noted the first Air Force official. Honeywell emerged as the sole vendor in response to a 2008 tender because Rolls-Royce of the U.K. withdrew from the competition. However, the clearance to buy 280 new Honeywell engines worth $2 billion has hit a roadblock in India’s Ministry of Defence because of the single-vendor situation, which the MoD tends to discourage, save exceptional circumstances.

    idrw.org .Read more at India No 1 Defence News Website http://idrw.org/india-jaguar-fighters-face-upgrade-challenges/ .
     
    Sancho and Blackjay like this.

Share This Page