Dismiss Notice
Welcome to IDF- Indian Defence Forum , register for free to join this friendly community of defence enthusiastic from around the world. Make your opinion heard and appreciated.

India Ballistic Missile Defense news and discussions thread

Discussion in 'Indian Military Doctrine' started by CONNAN, Feb 3, 2011.

  1. ArmChairGeneral

    ArmChairGeneral Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2013
    Messages:
    429
    Likes Received:
    47
    Manufacturing is NOT a problem. The Government can increase the size of the factories or subcontract to private sector.
    I can bet components coming from private sector mostly.

    The problem is always not placing orders. Orders are not placed in time. Funding for infrastructure is not released in time. Mostly planning and execution problems by Govt agencies.
     
  2. Vyom

    Vyom Captain REGISTERED

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2013
    Messages:
    1,932
    Likes Received:
    1,858
    As I said about 'not fast enough' does comprise of all your points stated above, Placing contracts can get the capacity of manufacturer to increase, but everything here takes time and that is where we lack. Delay in funding, placing order, babus scared of taking decisions, all these are hindrances, bottle necks, to manufacturing capacity that should have been already in place today, to me each passing day is a delay.
     
  3. ArmChairGeneral

    ArmChairGeneral Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2013
    Messages:
    429
    Likes Received:
    47
    In addition:

    1. Budget problems, as government has to juggle many things. The Congress has increased social expenditure a lot, so defence has become neglected.

    2. Fx outgo is always a problem in India.

    3. Technology - we keep on getting news of "successful test" year after year without any induction into services. Later on we realize that successful tests were all PARTIAL, and that system was not ready. This happens as the government is not honest about its projects. There is no proper mechanism to convey progress to the public. Add poor project and program management in governments labs and factories.

    4. Ecosystem - parts are made by a number of vendors. The manufacturing infrastructure in India is oriented towards low to medium tech, not high-tech. GOI has never encouraged high-tech industries. We are very poor in electronics and optics manufacture, two areas very critical to defence.

    5. No orientation towards indigenization in services. People pay lip service but effort is lacking.

    The end result is we have a lot of factories producing defence equipment and a lot of labs doing R&D but services do not get what they need. Services critical equipment is still imported. Imports happen in fits and starts, as per politics and preferences of the time. So much of the imported equipment goes into unserviceable state much earlier than planned.
     
  4. Soumya

    Soumya Major STAR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2013
    Messages:
    3,438
    Likes Received:
    1,814
    India successfully test-fires new interceptor missile

    India on Sunday successfully test-fired a new interceptor missile capable of neutralising any incoming long-range missile at higher altitude. The interceptor, positioned at launch pad IV of Integrated Test Range at Wheeler Island, about 100 km from Balasore, roared into the sky at about 9.10 am to hit its target.

    The target, mimicking an incoming enemy missile, was first test fired from a naval ship at 9.06 am and after getting signals from the radars, the interceptor went into action.

    "The trial was conducted successfully and all the mission objectives were met," DRDO Spokesman Ravi Kumar Gupta told PTI over phone.

    The details of the 'kill effect' of the interceptor missile were analysed after retrieving all the data from various radars and telemetry stations, an official said.

    Earlier Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), which is the premier agency to develop such a sophisticated interceptor, had successfully tested six interceptor missiles developed by it, both in endo-atmosphere (within 30 km altitude above sea level and exo-atmosphere stage (above 30 km altitude).

    The Prithvi Air Defence interceptor missile has already demonstrated its killing capability at an altitude of 50 km and 80 km while the Advanced Air Defence interceptor missile has smashed the target missile at an altitude of 15 km to 30 km.

    Now the target is to achieve the interception at an altitude of above 100 km of a long range missile, defence sources said.
     
    Gessler likes this.
  5. Soumya

    Soumya Major STAR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2013
    Messages:
    3,438
    Likes Received:
    1,814
    PDV interceptor launch video



    Source: Tarmak007
     
    Zeus_@21 and kaku like this.
  6. Soumya

    Soumya Major STAR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2013
    Messages:
    3,438
    Likes Received:
    1,814
    (Press Release | Unedited)

    In a significant milestone achieved in the direction of developing a two layered Ballistic Missile Defence system, DRDO today successfully carried out the maiden PDV mission meeting the mission objectives. PDV mission is for engaging the targets in the exo-atmosphere region at about more than 120km altitude.

    Both, the PDV interceptor and the two stage target equipped with motors were specially developed for the PDV mission. The target was developed for mimicking a "hostile Ballistic Missile approaching from more than 2000 km away" was launched at 0907 hrs from a Ship in the Bay of Bengal.

    In an automated operation, radar based detection and tracking system detected and tracked the enemy's ballistic missile. The computer network with the help of data received from Radars predicted the Trajectory of the incoming Ballistic Missile. PDV that was kept fully ready, took-off once the Computer system gave the necessary command for lift-off.

    The Interceptor guided by high accuracy Inertial Navigation System (INS) supported by a Redundant Micro Navigation System moved towards the estimated point of the interception. Once Missile crossed atmosphere, the Heat Shield ejected and the IR Seeker dome opened to look at the Target location as designated by the Mission Computer. With the help of Inertial Guidance and IR Seeker the Missile moved for interception.

    All events were monitored in real-time by the Telemetry/Range Stations, at various other locations. The mission was completed and the interception parameters were achieved.

    Shri Avinash Chander, SA TO RM and Secretary Deptt of Defence R&D congratulated the mission team. Dr VG Sekaran, DS & DG MSS; Dr Satish Reddy Dir RCI; Shri Adalat Ali, Program Director AD, Shri Y Sreenivas Rao RCI project Director AD; Dr PS Goel DRDO chair former chairman RAC; Shri Venu Gopal former Director DRDL; Shri MVKV Prasad Director ITR, Dr Tessy Thomas OS &PD A4 and other senior DRDO officials were present.
     
    Zeus_@21 and kaku like this.
  7. tusharm

    tusharm Captain FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2013
    Messages:
    1,003
    Likes Received:
    407
    Country Flag:
    India
  8. tusharm

    tusharm Captain FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2013
    Messages:
    1,003
    Likes Received:
    407
    Country Flag:
    India
    Imp Points to note

    Once the missile crossed the atmosphere, the Heat Shield ejected and the IR (Infrared) Seeker dome opened to look at the target location as designated by the Mission Computer.

    With the help of Inertial Guidance and IR Seeker the missile moved for interception.
     
  9. Gessler

    Gessler Lt. Colonel IDF NewBie

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,745
    Likes Received:
    9,636
    Country Flag:
    India
    PDV has been successfully tested

    [​IMG]

    Official DRDO Statement:
    In a significant milestone achieved in the direction of developing a two layered Ballistic Missile Defence system, DRDO today successfully carried out the maiden PDV mission meeting the mission objectives. PDV mission is for engaging the targets in the exo-atmosphere region at about more than 120km altitude.

    Both, the PDV interceptor and the two stage target equipped with motors were specially developed for the PDV mission. The target was developed for mimicking a "hostile Ballistic Missile approaching from more than 2000 km away" was launched at 0907 hrs from a Ship in the Bay of Bengal.

    In an automated operation, radar based detection and tracking system detected and tracked the enemy's ballistic missile. The computer network with the help of data received from Radars predicted the Trajectory of the incoming Ballistic Missile. PDV that was kept fully ready, took-off once the Computer system gave the necessary command for lift-off.

    The Interceptor guided by high accuracy Inertial Navigation System (INS) supported by a Redundant Micro Navigation System moved towards the estimated point of the interception. Once Missile crossed atmosphere, the Heat Shield ejected and the IR Seeker dome opened to look at the Target location as designated by the Mission Computer. With the help of Inertial Guidance and IR Seeker the Missile moved for interception.

    All events were monitored in real-time by the Telemetry/Range Stations, at various other locations. The mission was completed and the interception parameters were achieved.

    Livefist: VIDEO: Indian BMD's New Interceptor Missile Tested

     
    sangos likes this.
  10. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Messages:
    11,024
    Likes Received:
    3,042
    Country Flag:
    United States
    Interceptor spot on, though without blast: DRDO
    SOURCE: THE HINDU

    [​IMG]

    India’s ambitious mission on Sunday to intercept an “enemy” ballistic missile at a altitude of 120 km seems to have achieved only partial success. While the missile technologists of the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) say the interception did take place and the mission met its “important objectives,” they concede that the warhead in the interceptor missile, which took off from the Wheeler Island, did not explode.

    Avinash Chander, Scientific Adviser to the Defence Minister, said: “The infrared (IR) seeker in the interceptor could track the target, but we have not exploded the target. The target was not to be exploded.”

    Asked if the mission was only “partially successful,” Mr. Chander, architect of India’s Agni series of missiles, said, “The mission’s main objective was to track the target missile. We wanted to see the performance of the IR seeker. The warhead in the interceptor missile was not meant to be exploded in this mission. Since we did not fire the warhead, the debris did not fall.”

    Another DRDO missile technologist said: “We have recorded the interception.”

    Asked whether “a hit-to-kill” took place in the mission as it did in the previous six other interceptor flights from the Wheeler Island, he said: “We have to work out the missed distance between the target missile and the interceptor. Based on that, the hit-to-kill would take place. We are not able to say right now whether the hit-to-kill took place.”

    Yet another scientist said, “Whether the target missile was destroyed or not, I cannot say right now.”

    The DRDO was looking forward to this mission because it was “challenging” and “complex.” Of the DRDO’s seven interceptor missions, six were successful. The interceptions had taken place either in the endo-atmosphere (below 50 km) or in the exo-atmosphere (between 50 km and 80 km). But this mission was a different ball game because the interception was to be done at 120 km, providing very little time for the interceptor to blast off and waylay the attacker. So the motors in the interceptor called the Prithvi Defence Vehicle (PDV) and the target missile were specially developed. The target missile lifted off a ship in the Bay of Bengal, off Odisha at 9.07 a.m. It was a two-stage missile, “mimicking a hostile ballistic missile approaching from more than 2,000 km away,” a DRDO press release said.

    In an automated operation, radar-based systems on the Wheeler Island and in Paradip, Puri and Cuttack detected and tracked the “enemy” missile. The computer network, with the help of data from the radars, predicted its trajectory. The single-stage PDV interceptor took off two-and-a-half minutes later.

    The PDV, guided by the highly accurate inertial navigation system and supported by a redundant micro-navigation system, moved towards the point of interception. Once the PDV crossed the atmosphere, its heat shield domes covering the IR and radio frequency (RF) seekers fell off. So the two seeker domes opened to look at the incoming missile’s location. With the help of inertial guidance and the IR seeker, the PDV moved for the interception. “The mission was completed and the interception parameters were achieved,” the press release said.

    G. Satheesh Reddy, Director, Research Centre, Imarat , a DRDO missile facility in Hyderabad, said the mission featured several new technologies. Both the missiles had new, powerful motors. The heat shield, covering the IR and RF seekers, ejected for the first time. The seekers worked well. “This is the first time that an imaging seeker has been used for the air defence vehicle. The imaging seeker could see the incoming missile, track it and guide the interceptor towards the target.” The RCI team made the seekers and the inertial navigation and guidance system, Mr. Reddy said.

    Adalat Ali was the Programme Director and Y. Sreenivasa Rao, Project Director.
     
  11. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Messages:
    11,024
    Likes Received:
    3,042
    Country Flag:
    United States
    Prepare Multi-layered Shield Against Missiles
    SOURCE: EXPRESS NEWS SERVICE

    [​IMG]



    India’s Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) deserves laurels for successfully conducting two rounds of trials of its indigenously developed surface-to-air Akash missile as part of user trial by the air force from the Integrated Test Range (ITR) at Chandipur near Balasore in Odisha. Akash is a medium range surface-to-air anti-aircraft defence system developed by the DRDO as part of the Integrated Guided Missile Development Programme. While the Air Force version has already been inducted, the Army version is in the final stage of induction into the armed forces.

    The missile system, fitted with a state-of-the-art radar, developed by Electronics and Radar Development Establishment (LRDE) can simultaneously engage several targets. The radar carries out surveillance, tracks the target, acquires it and guides the missile towards it. Defence experts have compared it with the American MIM-104 Patriot surface-to-air missile system that is capable of neutralising aerial targets such as unmanned aerial vehicles, fighter jets, cruise missiles and air-to-surface missiles.

    Earlier, DRDO had successfully tested six interceptor missiles developed by it, both in endo-atmosphere (within 30km altitude above sea level) and exo-atmosphere stage (above 30km). The Prithvi Air Defence interceptor missile has already demonstrated its killing capability at an altitude of 50km and 80km while the Advanced Air Defence interceptor missile has smashed the target missile at an altitude of 15km to 30km. Now, the target is to achieve the interception at an altitude of above 100km of a long-range missile. Currently, only a small club of nations including the US, Russia and Israel possess an anti-ballistic missile system. These successful trials should not lead to any smugness in research and development of our missile programme. Sharing borders with nuclear-armed China and Pakistan, India cannot afford any let-up in developing a missile defence system that aims to provide a multi-layered shield against ballistic missile attack.
     
  12. tusharm

    tusharm Captain FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2013
    Messages:
    1,003
    Likes Received:
    407
    Country Flag:
    India
  13. Anish

    Anish Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2011
    Messages:
    5,959
    Likes Received:
    1,794
    Country Flag:
    India
    Agni-I Hits Target Area With Pin Point Accuracy

    BALASORE: Indian army personnel on Thursday successfully test fired nuclear capable surface-to-surface ballistic missile Agni-I from a defence base off the Odisha coast. The test was conducted by the strategic forces command (SFC) integrating all the operational systems and the strategic command network.


    Defence sources said the indigenously developed missile, propelled by solid rocket propellant system, blasted off from the launching complex-IV located in Wheeler Island, a part of Integrated Test Range (ITR) at about 11.15 am. After a vertical lift-off from launch pad, the missile rose into the sky leaving behind a ribbon of smokes.

    “The missile went off perfectly well and the performance of all systems had been exactly as expected. It followed the trajectory perfectly and reached the designated target in Bay of Bengal. The missile’s re-entry system worked flawlessly,” said an official.

    The launch was undertaken as a part of periodic training activity by the SFC to further consolidate operational readiness. The trajectory of the trial was tracked by a battery of sophisticated radars, telemetry observation stations, electro-optic instruments and naval ships from its launch till the missile hit the target area with pin point accuracy. The missile used for the test was picked up randomly from the production lot.

    According defence sources, the 700-km range missile can be fired from both road and rail mobile launchers. The 15 meters tall missile having a diameter of one meter weighs round 12 tonnes and can carry both conventional and nuclear payload of about 1,000 kg. It can flies at a speed of 2.5 km/sec.

    The need for the Agni-I, a part of minimum credible deterrence, was felt after the Kargil war with Pakistan. It took DRDO 15 months to develop the Agni-I after having completed Agni-II development. The first test of Agni-I was carried out on January 25, 2002.

    Prior to the test, armed security personnel in power boats were engaged to patrol around the Wheeler Island and fishermen were warned not to venture into the sea. Heavy security arrangements also were made along the seacoast.

    Agni-I has been developed by advanced systems laboratory, the premier missile development laboratory of the DRDO in collaboration with Defence Research Development Laboratory (DRDL) and Research Centre Imarat (RCI) and integrated by Bharat Dynamics Limited, Hyderabad.

    Commander-in-Chief of SFC Lieutenant General Amit Sharma, Scientific Advisor to defence Minister and DRDO Chief Avinash Chander, DRDO Director-General (Missiles and Strategic Systems) VG Sekaran and ITR Director MVKV Prasad witnessed the launch among other DRDO scientists and army officials.

     
    ajithharish likes this.
  14. jonas

    jonas Captain SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2013
    Messages:
    1,944
    Likes Received:
    541
  15. randomradio

    randomradio Colonel REGISTERED

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2013
    Messages:
    11,206
    Likes Received:
    6,310

Share This Page