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India does not retaliate against Pakistan due to nuclear weapons: US expert

Discussion in 'International Relations' started by Virajith, May 12, 2013.

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  1. Virajith

    Virajith Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    India does not retaliate despite Pakistan-backed terrorist attacks against it because of the deterrence of nuclear weapons that the two countries possess, an American defence expert has said.
    “All the terrorism that Pakistan has supported against India has been carried out, secure in the knowledge that India cannot retaliate,†Stephen Blank, Research Professor of National Security Affairs at the Army War College, said.

    “If Pakistan had no nukes, if there were no nukes on the South Indian peninsula, India could retaliate and probably would. But their hand is stayed by the threat of nuclear war,†Blank told a meeting of National Defense Industrial Association in response to a question.

    Similarly, nuclear weapons act as a deterrent for many countries, as was the case during the cold war between the US and China, he noted.

    “If you look at the map, the Russian Far East, which directly adjoins China, is what we call an economy of force theatre. It is a theatre that can only survive by sustaining itself,†Blank said.

    “If a war broke out between Russia and China – and now and then Russian military and political officials actually allude to the possibility of a Chinese threat — probably within a day the Chinese could take out the Trans-Siberian Railway and essentially isolate the area from the rest of continental Russia,†he said.

    “Therefore, the only recourse that the Russian military has in a contingency with China is nuclear,†he added.

    During the Cold War, at the strategic level of nuclear weapons, the Russians could at any time they wanted destroy all of Europe.

    “In return, we threatened to destroy all of the Soviet Union. That was basically the mutual hostage relationship. Then the US also became as well a target of enhanced Soviet capabilities,†he said.

    “If we are truly looking to build, ‘a new world order’, whatever that may be, and get beyond the Cold War, then we should not be encouraging people to build more nuclear weapons and to remain frozen in this posture of hostility and thinking about first-use scenarios,†Blank said.

    “So that already is the utility of nuclear weapons. It confers enormous political capabilities, as well as the strategic capability to wage conventional war. I mean, if you have nukes, you make the world safe for conventional warfare,†Blank said.


    India does not retaliate against Pakistan due to nuclear weapons: US expert | idrw.org
     
  2. Devil

    Devil Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    india does not retaliate if india does China will attack moreover so will U.S. Every idiot except U.S. knows that nuke are more of detterent not attacking weapons.

    Moreover U.S. just wants an excuse to blame india for something so india is under their control completely
     
  3. omya

    omya Lt. Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    suuk on my big salty ballls US :sarcastic:
     
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  4. Rock n Rolla

    Rock n Rolla Lt. Colonel STAR MEMBER

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    If the whole world is willing to give up nuclear weapons, then we are too.

    And it's not only the nukes that has saving Pakistan from an attack, it's Congress/UPA govt too. :sarcastic:
     
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  5. Himanshu Pandey

    Himanshu Pandey Don't get mad, get even. STAR MEMBER

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    now one more American started doing shit talk
     
  6. jonas

    jonas Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    On a smaller scale of things,this is very similar to the situation in Europe during the 50yrs of the 'Cold War'. Whilst most of us hate nuclear weapons the fact remains they can't just be 'uninvented' So if you have countries that have a long standing enmity,it is logical that if these countries have a parity in nuclear weapons and delivery systems they will think very hard before using them.

    This is a strange way to keep the peace but it does seem to work. During the cold war the Western Nations and the USSR reached the stage of 'Mutualy assured destruction',both sides knowing that if a nuclear war started they would both be completely destroyed.

    This does tend to concentrate ones thoughts when contemplating the use of nuclear weapons.
     
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  7. INDIAN NATIONALIST

    INDIAN NATIONALIST Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    India should employee measures, fully deniable and with no potential for trail back to source against Pakistan.
    Third party infiltrators, counter-intelligence, electronic warfare.
    It will also be good experience and exercise for India in these fields during peace time to maintain low level of aggression.

    If it was my decision, and if India would definitely only suffer limited nuclear retaliation, I think it would be worth it to take out IRP nuclear infrastructure once and for all and be prepared to commit whatever it takes to ensure that does not return...

    India made terrible mistake to allow IRP to develop nuclear capacity in the first place. Don't know what India was thinking (or maybe it wasn't) to just wait and watch that happen from across the border.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2013
  8. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    IN REAL LIFE


    It's official - India is not ready for war
    By Siddharth Srivastava

    NEW DELHI - In the first official admission that India is not ready for war, particularly with Pakistan, Defense Minister A K Antony has blamed government red tape for delays in modernizing the military.

    "Even though our government has earmarked huge budgets [for the military], this is not being fully reflected in our modernization efforts. Allocation of money has never been a problem. The issue


    has rather been the timely and judicious utilization of the money allocated," he said at a recent seminar in New Delhi.

    "We need to cut down on unnecessary procedural delays, bottlenecks and red tape in our procurement mechanism," he added.

    Antony said though the government had created the Defense Procurement Procedure (DPP), more changes in procedures were required to "optimize transparency, fairness and to ensure speedy procurement".

    The DPP was unveiled by the government in 2008 in hopes of speeding up the acquisition of armaments, systems and platforms while ensuring greater transparency in the procurement process.

    The government on Monday indicated it was reviewing the provisions of the DPP to remove bottlenecks and usher in greater private participation in the defense production sector, reported the Hindu newspaper.

    "DPP had been revised for the fourth time in 2008 and it still requires further refining," said Sashi Kant Sharma, the director of General Acquisitions at the Defense Ministry.

    India's defense expenditure for 2008-2009 dipped below 2% of gross domestic product for the first time in decades, an amount less than the global average of around 2.5%, and which lags behind America's 4.1% and Pakistan's 3.5%.

    Officials have told Asia Times Online that India did not launch a military strike against Pakistan following the Pakistan-linked Mumbai terror attacks last November because army commanders told New Delhi the country lacked enough artillery to defend its territory. (See Indian army 'backed out' of Pakistan attack , Asia Times Online, January 20 2009.)

    Sources have told ATol that the Defense Ministry's existing budgets are exhausted and that it is unhappy with delays in military procurement. The ministry has been pushing this year for at least a 30% hike in its budget to nearly 450 billion rupees (US$9.2 billion) for the armed forces.

    In 2007-8 about 28 billion rupees was spent on weapons acquisitions out of a budget of nearly 33 billion rupees. While in 2008-2009, a capital outlay of nearly 37.5 billion rupees was revised down to 30.5 billion rupees due to delays in the aircraft carrier Admiral Gorshkov, Eurocopter and BrahMos contracts.

    The parliamentary standing committee on defense said in its 2008 report that 13 billion rupees remained unspent in 2005-06, 30 billion rupees in 2003-04 and 90 billion rupees in 2002-03. These were funds which were supposed to modernize India's armed forces.

    In total, 210 billion rupees has remained unspent in the five years (2003-7), as deals were scrapped or delayed due to controversy and kickback allegations. The slippages led to a year-end surrender of funds in 2007.

    However, change is in the air following the Mumbai attack. The India-Pakistan tensions which followed have put a sense of urgency in India's military upgrading efforts, and US$50 billion is expected to be spent on modernization over the next five years.

    Last week, Air Chief Marshal Fali Homi Major, the new chief of the air staff, said the Indian Air Force would utilize annual budgets and spend the full amount it has been allocated.

    There is now hope that India's military will modernize as the government loosens the purse strings. India's wish list includes fighter jets, helicopters, nuclear submarines, radars, warships, reconnaissance aircraft and long-delayed Howitzer field guns, among others.

    Over 300 foreign defense firms and many Indian ones are looking to impress at the Aero India-2009 air show in Bangalore from February 11-15.

    Leading companies from Germany, France, Britain, Russia, the United States, Italy, Belgium, Israel and Australia are participating. Major aviation and weapons systems firms attending include Boeing, Sikorsky, EADS, BAE Systems MiG-Sukhoi, Embraer, Bombardier and SAAB.

    Last month the army made a fast-track order of 4,100 French-origin Milan-2T anti-tank guided missiles (ATGMs), as the indigenous Nag missile is yet to be operational. The 6 billion rupee order for the Milan ATGMs has been on hold for a while, like other military orders.

    Since Mumbai officials say there is an emerging consensus among the political leadership, the bureaucracy and military commanders that New Delhi cannot be "caught napping" again, given the heightened tensions between India and Pakistan.

    Although a drawn-out war between the neighbors has been more or less ruled out due to expected intervention by Western powers, particularly the US, India needs to be prepared for a short war with Pakistan.

    "Surgical strikes [against Pakistan] are definitely feasible," India's army chief General Deepak Kapoor was quoted as saying this week. "But whether you wish to take that decision or not is a separate issue," he said.

    India has a long way to go to put its near obsolete military arsenal in order, as no defense contracts have escaped the usual cycle of corruption allegations, political brinkmanship and investigations.

    One example is the Bofors gun corruption scandal of the 1980s, when several Indian politicians, including then-prime minister Rajiv Gandhi, were accused of receiving kickbacks from Bofors AB for winning a bid to supply India's 155 mm field howitzer.

    This scandal severely affected the army's artillery modernization plan, with no powerful guns being introduced since the 1986 purchase of 410 Bofors 155mm/39-caliber howitzers.

    The army has been looking to import 400 such artillery guns from abroad and manufacture another 1,100 domestically, without success.

    Several experts' reports, including at least one by the independent Comptroller and Auditor (CAG), have highlighted the inadequacies in India's main battle tank (MBT) fleet - the main strike force of any army. Almost all of India's MBT fleet are of Russian origin.

    The CAG report focused on India's deficiency vis-a-vis Pakistan, as the more immediate threat, but also deficiencies with regard to China are too glaring to even be addressed. It clearly pointed at tank, upgrades and technology transfer issues with Russia.

    Last year, Kapoor also said that Russia had been delaying technology transfer on the T-90s, which has in turn pushed back production in India. India purchased 310 of these tanks in 2001 and in 2007, and signed a contract for another 347.

    Pakistan has a crack fleet of about 1,300 Chinese and Ukrainian tanks.

    Experts have also highlighted India's inadequacies in missile attack capability when compared to Pakistan's China- and North Korea-backed program. India's efforts to test a nuclear-enabled BrahMos cruise missile failed last month. ’ Among India's ballistic missiles, only the short-range (150-350 kilometers) Prithvi is battle-ready. Though India has successfully tested the longer range (700-2,000 kilometer) Agni missiles, they are yet to be fully operational and are still being tested.

    Siddharth Srivastava is a New Delhi-based journalist. He can be reached at sidsri@yahoo.com.

    Asia Times Online :: South Asia news, business and economy from India and Pakistan
     
  9. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    IN REAL LIFE


    It's official - India is not ready for war
    By Siddharth Srivastava

    NEW DELHI - In the first official admission that India is not ready for war, particularly with Pakistan, Defense Minister A K Antony has blamed government red tape for delays in modernizing the military.

    "Even though our government has earmarked huge budgets [for the military], this is not being fully reflected in our modernization efforts. Allocation of money has never been a problem. The issue


    has rather been the timely and judicious utilization of the money allocated," he said at a recent seminar in New Delhi.

    "We need to cut down on unnecessary procedural delays, bottlenecks and red tape in our procurement mechanism," he added.

    Antony said though the government had created the Defense Procurement Procedure (DPP), more changes in procedures were required to "optimize transparency, fairness and to ensure speedy procurement".

    The DPP was unveiled by the government in 2008 in hopes of speeding up the acquisition of armaments, systems and platforms while ensuring greater transparency in the procurement process.

    The government on Monday indicated it was reviewing the provisions of the DPP to remove bottlenecks and usher in greater private participation in the defense production sector, reported the Hindu newspaper.

    "DPP had been revised for the fourth time in 2008 and it still requires further refining," said Sashi Kant Sharma, the director of General Acquisitions at the Defense Ministry.

    India's defense expenditure for 2008-2009 dipped below 2% of gross domestic product for the first time in decades, an amount less than the global average of around 2.5%, and which lags behind America's 4.1% and Pakistan's 3.5%.

    Officials have told Asia Times Online that India did not launch a military strike against Pakistan following the Pakistan-linked Mumbai terror attacks last November because army commanders told New Delhi the country lacked enough artillery to defend its territory. (See Indian army 'backed out' of Pakistan attack , Asia Times Online, January 20 2009.)

    Sources have told ATol that the Defense Ministry's existing budgets are exhausted and that it is unhappy with delays in military procurement. The ministry has been pushing this year for at least a 30% hike in its budget to nearly 450 billion rupees (US$9.2 billion) for the armed forces.

    In 2007-8 about 28 billion rupees was spent on weapons acquisitions out of a budget of nearly 33 billion rupees. While in 2008-2009, a capital outlay of nearly 37.5 billion rupees was revised down to 30.5 billion rupees due to delays in the aircraft carrier Admiral Gorshkov, Eurocopter and BrahMos contracts.

    The parliamentary standing committee on defense said in its 2008 report that 13 billion rupees remained unspent in 2005-06, 30 billion rupees in 2003-04 and 90 billion rupees in 2002-03. These were funds which were supposed to modernize India's armed forces.

    In total, 210 billion rupees has remained unspent in the five years (2003-7), as deals were scrapped or delayed due to controversy and kickback allegations. The slippages led to a year-end surrender of funds in 2007.

    However, change is in the air following the Mumbai attack. The India-Pakistan tensions which followed have put a sense of urgency in India's military upgrading efforts, and US$50 billion is expected to be spent on modernization over the next five years.

    Last week, Air Chief Marshal Fali Homi Major, the new chief of the air staff, said the Indian Air Force would utilize annual budgets and spend the full amount it has been allocated.

    There is now hope that India's military will modernize as the government loosens the purse strings. India's wish list includes fighter jets, helicopters, nuclear submarines, radars, warships, reconnaissance aircraft and long-delayed Howitzer field guns, among others.

    Over 300 foreign defense firms and many Indian ones are looking to impress at the Aero India-2009 air show in Bangalore from February 11-15.

    Leading companies from Germany, France, Britain, Russia, the United States, Italy, Belgium, Israel and Australia are participating. Major aviation and weapons systems firms attending include Boeing, Sikorsky, EADS, BAE Systems MiG-Sukhoi, Embraer, Bombardier and SAAB.

    Last month the army made a fast-track order of 4,100 French-origin Milan-2T anti-tank guided missiles (ATGMs), as the indigenous Nag missile is yet to be operational. The 6 billion rupee order for the Milan ATGMs has been on hold for a while, like other military orders.

    Since Mumbai officials say there is an emerging consensus among the political leadership, the bureaucracy and military commanders that New Delhi cannot be "caught napping" again, given the heightened tensions between India and Pakistan.

    Although a drawn-out war between the neighbors has been more or less ruled out due to expected intervention by Western powers, particularly the US, India needs to be prepared for a short war with Pakistan.

    "Surgical strikes [against Pakistan] are definitely feasible," India's army chief General Deepak Kapoor was quoted as saying this week. "But whether you wish to take that decision or not is a separate issue," he said.

    India has a long way to go to put its near obsolete military arsenal in order, as no defense contracts have escaped the usual cycle of corruption allegations, political brinkmanship and investigations.

    One example is the Bofors gun corruption scandal of the 1980s, when several Indian politicians, including then-prime minister Rajiv Gandhi, were accused of receiving kickbacks from Bofors AB for winning a bid to supply India's 155 mm field howitzer.

    This scandal severely affected the army's artillery modernization plan, with no powerful guns being introduced since the 1986 purchase of 410 Bofors 155mm/39-caliber howitzers.

    The army has been looking to import 400 such artillery guns from abroad and manufacture another 1,100 domestically, without success.

    Several experts' reports, including at least one by the independent Comptroller and Auditor (CAG), have highlighted the inadequacies in India's main battle tank (MBT) fleet - the main strike force of any army. Almost all of India's MBT fleet are of Russian origin.

    The CAG report focused on India's deficiency vis-a-vis Pakistan, as the more immediate threat, but also deficiencies with regard to China are too glaring to even be addressed. It clearly pointed at tank, upgrades and technology transfer issues with Russia.

    Last year, Kapoor also said that Russia had been delaying technology transfer on the T-90s, which has in turn pushed back production in India. India purchased 310 of these tanks in 2001 and in 2007, and signed a contract for another 347.

    Pakistan has a crack fleet of about 1,300 Chinese and Ukrainian tanks.

    Experts have also highlighted India's inadequacies in missile attack capability when compared to Pakistan's China- and North Korea-backed program. India's efforts to test a nuclear-enabled BrahMos cruise missile failed last month. ’ Among India's ballistic missiles, only the short-range (150-350 kilometers) Prithvi is battle-ready. Though India has successfully tested the longer range (700-2,000 kilometer) Agni missiles, they are yet to be fully operational and are still being tested.

    Siddharth Srivastava is a New Delhi-based journalist. He can be reached at sidsri@yahoo.com.

    Asia Times Online :: South Asia news, business and economy from India and Pakistan
     
  10. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Indian army 'backed out' of Pakistan attack
    By Siddharth Srivastava

    NEW DELHI - Reluctance for battle by an ill-prepared army could have resulted in India not launching an attack on Pakistan in the aftermath of the Pakistan-linked terror attack in the Indian city of Mumbai on November 26 in which nearly 200 people died.

    High-level government sources have told Asia Times Online that army commanders impressed on the political leadership in New Delhi that an inadequate and obsolete arsenal at their disposal mitigated against an all-out war.

    The navy and air force, however, had given the government the go-ahead about their preparedness to carry out an attack and repulse
    any retaliation from Pakistan.

    Over the past few weeks, it has become increasingly apparent from top officials in the know that the closed-door meetings of top military commanders and political leaders discussed the poor state of the armory (both ammunition and artillery), and that this tilted the balance in favor of not striking at Pakistan.

    According to senior officials, following the attack on Mumbai by 10 militants linked to Pakistan, India's top leadership looked at two options closely - war and hot pursuit.

    Largely for the reasons cited above, the notion of an all-out war was rejected. Hot pursuit, however, remains very much on the table.

    The government sources say that a framework for covert operations is being put in place, although India will continue to deny such actions. Crack naval, air and army forces backed by federal intelligence agencies will be involved. The target areas will be Pakistan-administered Kashmir and areas along the Punjab, such as Multan, where some of the Mumbai attackers are believed to have been recruited.

    The coastal belt from the southern port city of Karachi to Gwadar in Balochistan province will also be under active Indian surveillance.

    Thumbs down to war
    Following the Mumbai attack, New Delhi's inclination was to launch a quick strike against Pakistan to impress domestic opinion, and then be prepared for a short war, given the pressures that would be exercised by international powers for a ceasefire to prevent nuclear war breaking out.

    The expectation of New Delhi was that the war would go beyond the traditional skirmishes involving artillery fire that take place at the Kashmir border, essentially to check infiltration by militants, or the brief but bloody exchanges at Kargil in 1999.

    It was in this context that the army made it apparent that it was not equipped to fight such a war, given the military's presence along the eastern Chinese borders, and that India was at risk of ceding territory should an instant ceasefire be brokered with Pakistan.

    This would have been highly embarrassing, not to mention political suicide for the Congress-led government in an election year. So instead, New Delhi restricted itself to a strident diplomatic offensive that continues to date, and the option of hot pursuit.

    The air force, on the other hand, was confident that it was prepared to take on the first retaliatory action by Pakistan, expected at forward air force bases along India's borders in Rajasthan, Gujarat and Indian-administered Kashmir. The role of the navy in the operations was not clearly defined, but it was to cover from the Arabian Sea.

    Not ready to fight
    Various experts, former generals and independent reports have voiced concern over the past few years about the state of preparedness of the Indian army.

    For example, the Bofors gun scandal of the 1980s stymied the army's artillery modernization plan, with no induction of powerful guns since the 1986 purchase of 410 Bofors 155mm/39-caliber howitzers. The army has been trying to introduce 400 such guns from abroad and another 1,100 manufactured domestically, without success.

    The latest report by the independent Comptroller and Auditor General said the state's production of 23mm ammunition for Shilka anti-aircraft cannons and 30mm guns mounted on infantry combat vehicles lacked quality. Further, supply was nearly 35% short of requirements.

    India's huge tank fleet is in bad shape due to a shortage of Russian spare parts, while indigenous efforts, such as the main battle tank Arjun, have failed.

    Signs of trouble emerged during the Kargil war when it was revealed that India's defense forces were dealing with acute shortages in every sphere.

    In remarks that underscored the problems, the then-army chief, V P Malik, said his forces would make do with whatever was in hand, given the fears of a full-scale war that was eventually avoided due to pressure by America, then under president Bill Clinton.

    The Kargil review committee report noted, "The heavy involvement of the army in counter-insurgency operations cannot but affect its preparedness for its primary role, which is to defend the country against external aggression."

    Although there have been attempts to hasten India's overall defense modernization program, estimated at over US$50 billion over the next five years, gaping holes need to be plugged, including corruption and massive delays in the defense procurement processes.

    India's defense expenditure has dipped below 2% of gross domestic product for the first time in decades, despite experts pegging 3% as adequate.

    Other defense arms are in dire need of enhancement. Fighter jet squadrons are much below required strength, while the bidding process for medium fighter planes has only just begun and may take a few years to complete.

    Meanwhile, the prospects of an India-Pakistan conflict are not over. India's army chief, General Deepak Kapoor, said last week that Pakistan had redeployed troops from its Afghan border to the western frontier with India. "The Indian army has factored this in its planning," Kapoor said.
    Asia Times Online :: South Asia news, business and economy from India and Pakistan
     
  11. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
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    Country Flag:
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    Indian army 'backed out' of Pakistan attack
    By Siddharth Srivastava

    NEW DELHI - Reluctance for battle by an ill-prepared army could have resulted in India not launching an attack on Pakistan in the aftermath of the Pakistan-linked terror attack in the Indian city of Mumbai on November 26 in which nearly 200 people died.

    High-level government sources have told Asia Times Online that army commanders impressed on the political leadership in New Delhi that an inadequate and obsolete arsenal at their disposal mitigated against an all-out war.

    The navy and air force, however, had given the government the go-ahead about their preparedness to carry out an attack and repulse
    any retaliation from Pakistan.

    Over the past few weeks, it has become increasingly apparent from top officials in the know that the closed-door meetings of top military commanders and political leaders discussed the poor state of the armory (both ammunition and artillery), and that this tilted the balance in favor of not striking at Pakistan.

    According to senior officials, following the attack on Mumbai by 10 militants linked to Pakistan, India's top leadership looked at two options closely - war and hot pursuit.

    Largely for the reasons cited above, the notion of an all-out war was rejected. Hot pursuit, however, remains very much on the table.

    The government sources say that a framework for covert operations is being put in place, although India will continue to deny such actions. Crack naval, air and army forces backed by federal intelligence agencies will be involved. The target areas will be Pakistan-administered Kashmir and areas along the Punjab, such as Multan, where some of the Mumbai attackers are believed to have been recruited.

    The coastal belt from the southern port city of Karachi to Gwadar in Balochistan province will also be under active Indian surveillance.

    Thumbs down to war
    Following the Mumbai attack, New Delhi's inclination was to launch a quick strike against Pakistan to impress domestic opinion, and then be prepared for a short war, given the pressures that would be exercised by international powers for a ceasefire to prevent nuclear war breaking out.

    The expectation of New Delhi was that the war would go beyond the traditional skirmishes involving artillery fire that take place at the Kashmir border, essentially to check infiltration by militants, or the brief but bloody exchanges at Kargil in 1999.

    It was in this context that the army made it apparent that it was not equipped to fight such a war, given the military's presence along the eastern Chinese borders, and that India was at risk of ceding territory should an instant ceasefire be brokered with Pakistan.

    This would have been highly embarrassing, not to mention political suicide for the Congress-led government in an election year. So instead, New Delhi restricted itself to a strident diplomatic offensive that continues to date, and the option of hot pursuit.

    The air force, on the other hand, was confident that it was prepared to take on the first retaliatory action by Pakistan, expected at forward air force bases along India's borders in Rajasthan, Gujarat and Indian-administered Kashmir. The role of the navy in the operations was not clearly defined, but it was to cover from the Arabian Sea.

    Not ready to fight
    Various experts, former generals and independent reports have voiced concern over the past few years about the state of preparedness of the Indian army.

    For example, the Bofors gun scandal of the 1980s stymied the army's artillery modernization plan, with no induction of powerful guns since the 1986 purchase of 410 Bofors 155mm/39-caliber howitzers. The army has been trying to introduce 400 such guns from abroad and another 1,100 manufactured domestically, without success.

    The latest report by the independent Comptroller and Auditor General said the state's production of 23mm ammunition for Shilka anti-aircraft cannons and 30mm guns mounted on infantry combat vehicles lacked quality. Further, supply was nearly 35% short of requirements.

    India's huge tank fleet is in bad shape due to a shortage of Russian spare parts, while indigenous efforts, such as the main battle tank Arjun, have failed.

    Signs of trouble emerged during the Kargil war when it was revealed that India's defense forces were dealing with acute shortages in every sphere.

    In remarks that underscored the problems, the then-army chief, V P Malik, said his forces would make do with whatever was in hand, given the fears of a full-scale war that was eventually avoided due to pressure by America, then under president Bill Clinton.

    The Kargil review committee report noted, "The heavy involvement of the army in counter-insurgency operations cannot but affect its preparedness for its primary role, which is to defend the country against external aggression."

    Although there have been attempts to hasten India's overall defense modernization program, estimated at over US$50 billion over the next five years, gaping holes need to be plugged, including corruption and massive delays in the defense procurement processes.

    India's defense expenditure has dipped below 2% of gross domestic product for the first time in decades, despite experts pegging 3% as adequate.

    Other defense arms are in dire need of enhancement. Fighter jet squadrons are much below required strength, while the bidding process for medium fighter planes has only just begun and may take a few years to complete.

    Meanwhile, the prospects of an India-Pakistan conflict are not over. India's army chief, General Deepak Kapoor, said last week that Pakistan had redeployed troops from its Afghan border to the western frontier with India. "The Indian army has factored this in its planning," Kapoor said.
    Asia Times Online :: South Asia news, business and economy from India and Pakistan
     
  12. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Sometimes reality has a way of sneaking up and biting us in the ass. And when the dam bursts, all you can do is swim. The world of pretend is a cage, not a cocoon. We can only lie to ourselves for so long. We are tired, we are scared, denying it doesn't change the truth. Sooner or later we have to put aside our denial and face the world. Head on, guns blazing. De Nile. It's not just a river in Egypt, it's a freakin' ocean. So how do you keep from drowning in it?


    Meredith Grey quotes
     
  13. Devil

    Devil Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    idiots never learn truth that's why they keep geting screwed their whole life
     
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