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India Looks For Military Technology Transfer Deal With Israel

Discussion in 'Indian Defence Industry' started by Manmohan Yadav, Mar 28, 2017.

  1. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    New Delhi — The stalled purchase of hundreds of anti-tank guided missile Spike is expected to get a fresh lease of life from the Cabinet Committee on Security under Prime Minister Modi under a $1-billion purchase plan in the next few days.

    India will go ahead with purchase of Spike missile despite the single bid situation. India’s defense procurement policy does not allow such purchase where only one company is eligible for tender. But the Indian government is keen to sign the contract with Israeli firm Rafael Advanced Defense Systems as it has agreed to transfer technology for the missile under Make in India project whereas contract may be signed for building 1,500 systems and around 30,000 additional missiles in India. In May 2016, India had finalized price negotiations for 275 launchers and 5,500 Spike missiles in completed and kit form.

    The Indian government is also considering a proposal to buy combat UAVs Heron TP made by Israel. India may approve the purchase if Israel agrees to transfer technology to India under the Make in India project. Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) had announced a new export-version of Heron TP on February 9, 2017. Sources said IAI has changed the capacity of Heron TP for countries that are members of Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR). The export version of Heron TP can carry a payload of 450 kg. India became the 35th MTCR member last June.

    “Indian demand for technology transfer is very important and in line with Make in India theme. Our past experience on technology transfer by various manufacturers has not been good. Most of them do not want India to become independent. We need foreign help in critical technologies like UAVs. We will need item-specific joint ventures with foreign firms,” said Air Marshal (retired) Anil Chopra.

    Currently, more than 200 drones, primarily Heron from Israel and locally-made Nishant, are serving the Indian armed forces. Earlier, Indian armed forces were hoping indigenous combat version of home-made drones will be inducted but the Defense Research and Development Organization announced recently that Rustom 2 will not be a combat drone. Indian scientists are yet to succeed in integrating a missile on the Rustom series of drones.

    India has recently bought a few thousand anti-tank guided missiles and critical tank components to augment emergency weapons for Indian military.
     
  2. Averageamerican

    Averageamerican Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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    Spike Served: India’s New ATGM
    Mar 28, 2017 00:26 UTC by Defense Industry Daily staff
    Latest update [?]
    March 27/17: India is moving ahead [​IMG] [​IMG] with a $1 billion procurement of Spike [​IMG] [​IMG] anti-tank missiles from Israel’s Rafael Advanced Defense Systems. The Spike will see New Delhi acquire 275 launchers and 5,500 Spike missiles in completed and kit form along with an undisclosed number of simulators, and also includes a technology transfer to India’s state-owned Bharat Dynamics Limited (BDL) to build another 1,500 systems and around 30,000 additional missiles. Meanwhile, Israel is considering [​IMG] [​IMG] selling armed Heron TP UAVs, including the technology transfers necessary to meet the “Make in India” requirement. A decision on the Heron deal will be made following Indian Prime Minister Modi’s visit to Israel this July.

    Keep reading for the whole story with recent events put in context
    [​IMG]
    Spike firing
    (click to view full)
    India has been looking for a modern anti-tank/ infantry strike missile to take the place of MBDA Milan missiles that have been produced under license by Bharat Dynamics. The finalists in this competition were the American fire-and-forget Javelin, and Israel’s Spike with its combination of wire guided or fire-and-forget modes. As of October 2014, Spike appears to have won, despite offers from the USA to involve India in developing the next version of Javelin.



    The Spike Family
    [​IMG]


    Spike family
    The Spike infantry system consists of a missile in its cannister, a tripod, a Command Launch Unit that contains the optics and firing system, and a battery. It can go from “off” to firing in less than 30 seconds, as the operator lays the cross hairs on the aim point using either the 10x day sight, or the clip-on thermal imaging night sight.

    Fire-and-forget targeting uses the imaging infrared (IIR) seeker, but there’s also an optional fully guided mode, using a fiber optic wire that spools out from the rear. They can be combined via “fire and forget plus,” which locks a target before launch but can be used to change targets or abort after launch. The missile flies in a lofted trajectory, hitting the target in a terminal dive and detonating a tandem high-explosive warhead that can defeat explosive reactive armor. The lofted trajectory also allows the missile to hit targets that are behind earthen walls, or otherwise not directly visible in line of sight. Reloading takes less than 15 seconds.

    Spike-MR/ Gill is designed as an infantry-only weapon, and weighs 26 kg/ 57.2 pounds when fully assembled (13.3 kg missile in cannister, 5 kg CLU, 4 kg Thermal Sight, 1 kg missile, 2.8 kg tripod). Its effective range is 2.5 km. Spike-LR is a vehicle and infantry weapon that uses common systems, and extends effective range to 4 km. Vehicle variants include launch mountings and a control console, and Spike has been integrated into missile-capable Remote Weapons Systems.

    Beyond these infantry weapons, Spike-ER is a larger missile that equips a number of helicopter types, and reaches out to 8 km. A special helicopter and vehicle-mounted variant called Spike-NLOS extends range to 25 km, and relies heavily on “fire and forget plus” via optical guidance. Neither appears to be on India’s acquisition radar just yet, but once Indian firms are license-building Spike family weapons, the government can always sign subsequent agreements to broaden its scope.

    Contracts & Key Events


    [​IMG]


    Spike components
    (click to view full)
    March 27/17: India is moving ahead [​IMG] with a $1 billion procurement of Spike [​IMG] anti-tank missiles from Israel’s Rafael Advanced Defense Systems. The Spike will see New Delhi acquire 275 launchers and 5,500 Spike missiles in completed and kit form along with an undisclosed number of simulators, and also includes a technology transfer to India’s state-owned Bharat Dynamics Limited (BDL) to build another 1,500 systems and around 30,000 additional missiles. Meanwhile, Israel is considering [​IMG] selling armed Heron TP UAVs, including the technology transfers necessary to meet the “Make in India” requirement. A decision on the Heron deal will be made following Indian Prime Minister Modi’s visit to Israel this July.

    August 18/15: The German Army is reportedly [​IMG] buying Spike-LR [​IMG] Anti-Tank Guided Missiles (ATGM) from Israel’s Rafael Defense Systems. The missile family has found export success with India, with the Bundeswehr planning to equip some Puma IFVs with the weapon. The German Defense Ministry has reportedly already purchased a number of the missiles, with the integration with Puma vehicles scheduled for completion by 2018.

    Oct 24/14: Spike picked. India’s top-level Defence Acquisition Council clears INR 900 billion in acquisitions. New submarines are the biggest, but there’s also clearance for up to INR 32 billion to buy and license-build about 300 Spike family launcher systems and 8,000 missiles.

    Other DAC clearances include INR 530 billion for 6 submarines; 2 SDV underwater commando delivery vehicles; INR 20 billion to have the state-owned Ordnance Factory Board build about 360 more BMP-2 tracked IFVs under license; and INR 18.5 billion for 12 more license-built Do-228NG short-range transport and maritime surveillance aircraft from HAL. Sources: NDTV, “6 Made-in-India Submarines for Navy for 53,000 Crores” | IANS, “Defence ministry clears Israeli anti-tank missile, six submarines”.

    DAC Approval: Spike wins



    Nov 11/13: DAC delays. Indian defense minister AK Antony and the Defence Acquisition Council give Javelin an opening in India, by delaying any decision on INR 150 billion project to equip India with 321 Spike family launchers and 8,356 of RAFAEL’s Spike-MR missiles.

    Raytheon had received the Indian Army’s 2010 RFP, but only RAFAEL responded. Europe’s MBDA, Russia’s Rosoboronexport, Raytheon, and General Dynamics reportedly balked at India’s technology-transfer requirements, and did not bid. The Lockheed/ Raytheon Javelin needs the competition to be withdrawn and replaced by another RFP that it can enter, at which point India’s own state-run firms might choose to offer a version of their problem-plagued Nag missile. DAC’s non-decision leaves the entire situation very unclear.

    Even if RAFAEL does win, Javelin is expected to remain a viable competitor for subsequent infantry buys. Sources: Times of India, “Antony defers decision on critical but controversial missile deals with Israel” | Defense News, “India Again Considers Buying Israeli-made ATGM” | Defense News, “India Pursues Indigenous ATGM Amid Javelin Talks” | Times of India, “Scam-wary Army calls off Israeli missile deal” (March 2013).

    Nov 29/12: Competition. The Times of India reports [​IMG] that Israel’s Spike-MR missile [​IMG] may be about to elbow Javelin aside, because the Israelis are willing to transfer enough technology to allow production in India.

    The Ministry eventually wants to equip all 356 of its infantry battalions with an estimated 2,000 launchers and 24,000 missiles, produced by state-owned Bharat Dynamics. The Army reportedly wants to complete the induction of these anti-tank guided missiles by the end of the 12th Plan (2017).

    Sept 23/12: Javelin issues. India remains interested in the Lockheed/Raytheon Javelin. Their soldiers fired some in 2009 joint exercises with American troops, and Defence Minister AK Antony said in August 2010 that a Letter of Request would be sent. So, why has no DSCA request been approved? India’s PTI explains that conditions regarding the secrecy of certain components are holding up an agreement. This isn’t the first time transfer of technology and proprietary designs have had an impact on US-Indian sales, and it won’t be the last. Raytheon will say only that:

    “The Javelin JV stands ready to respond to all requests of the Indian government relating to the evaluation and procurement of the combat-proven missile while ensuring it adheres to a US and Indian governments’ agreement.”

    If Javelin continues to hit roadblocks, Israel’s RAFAEL awaits with its popular Spike family.

    March 25/11: RFP exclusion. Spike MR was the only bidder in India’s international tender, in part of because of language requiring an “active-passive fire-and-forget guidance system,” which only Spike meets. Most other missiles are either active/ passive guidance that requires crosshairs on target (GBM-71 TOW, AT-14 Kornet, MBDA Milan-ER), or fire and forget (FGM-148 Javelin). Defense Update writes:

    “The Indian Army plans to install the missiles on infantry combat vehicles currently carrying locally produced AT-5 or Milan missiles.

    The Indian Ministry of Defense plans to order 321 launchers, and 8,356 missiles, plus 15 training simulators in a multi-phase arms package worth over one billion US$. Two options are currently on the table – the U.S. Javelin and the Israeli Spike MR.”

    Reports are currently conflicting. Defense Update suggests that both programs are proceeding in parallel channels, and at some point either the RFP (Spike MR) or a government-to-government deal (Javelin) will win out. The challenge for RAFAEL is that India has rules discouraging awards to competitions that wind up with just 1 compliant vendor, so a waiver will be needed. For Javelin, the issue is technology transfer. Sources: Defense Update, “Spike or Javelin? India Still Undecided on a Billion Dollar Missile Buy”.
     
    Sancho likes this.
  3. OverLoad

    OverLoad Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Good choice and would be a good decision by India since Russia only believes in milking the cow especially India.
    They refused India in every joint production of equipment minus the Brahmos which is actually a Yakont assembling in India.
    They reused to help or TOT for Jet engine. Kaveri is an example.
    They refused to jointly develop stealth fighter with TOT.
     
  4. GSLV Mk III

    GSLV Mk III Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Totally different story.
     
    Levina likes this.
  5. GSLV Mk III

    GSLV Mk III Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    How is FGFA proceeding these days then.
     

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