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India wins International Court of Justice seat as U.K. withdraws nominee in the face of defeat

Discussion in 'International Relations' started by proud_indian, Nov 21, 2017.

  1. proud_indian

    proud_indian 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    No British judge on world court for first time in its 71-year history
    Indian candidate fills 15th and final place on bench of international court of justice after UK withdraws its pick for post\

    [​IMG]

    UN security council members vote for prospective ICJ members in New York. Photograph: Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images
    Owen Bowcott Legal affairs correspondent

    Monday 20 November 2017 23.21 GMTLast modified on Tuesday 21 November 2017 00.35 GMT

    The UK will not have a judge on the bench of the international court of justice for the first time in its 71-year history after the British candidate withdrew following an acrimonious competition.


    Minutes after an 11th round of voting was scheduled to begin in New York on Monday, a letter was released by the UK mission to the UN announcing that Sir Christopher Greenwood would accept defeat and allow the rival Indian candidate, Dalveer Bhandari, to fill the final vacancy on the ICJ.

    The decision to bow to mounting opposition within the UN general assembly is a humiliating blow to British international prestige and an acceptance of a diminished status in international affairs.

    [​IMG]
    Dalveer Bhandari. Photograph: Hindustan Times/Getty Images
    That the runoff for the last place on what is known as the world court was between Britain and India, a nation likely to feature as a more significant trading partner post-Brexit, may have been a contributory element in the final calculations.

    There have been calls in Indian media for the country to leave the Commonwealth if the UK exploited its position as one of the five permanent members of the security council to defend its weakened position.

    The ICJ is composed of 15 judges elected to nine-year terms by the UN general assembly and the UN security council.

    Four other judges, from Brazil, France, Lebanon and Somalia, had already been elected to the ICJ in the earlier rounds.

    In the last round of voting at the UN a week ago, Greenwood secured only 68 votes in the general assembly against Bhandari’s 121 votes. The British candidate, however, had nine votes in the UN security council against the Indian’s five. A majority in both the general assembly and security council was required to win a place on the ICJ bench.

    The race for last place involved weeks of diplomatic lobbying and, in the end, the UK was partially the victim of residual international resentment in the UN general assembly of the dominance and privileges of the permanent five members of the security council – the US, Britain, France, China and Russia.

    Other factors also torpedoed UK efforts. Greenwood, a highly experienced and capable lawyer, was tainted in some eyes because of his advice to the Blair government in the run-up to the Iraq invasion in 2003.

    He was instructed by the then attorney general, Lord Goldsmith, to examine the arguments over the legality of using force against Saddam Hussein and concluded that use of force was justified.

    This is the second time the UK has been humiliated at the UN in recent months, amid signs that some EU nations no longer feel the need to automatically support an isolationist former partner.

    There has also been resentment of the foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, and his undiplomatic put-downs of other countries.

    In a separate vote at the UN general assembly last June, the UK was defeated 94-15 when a Mauritian-backed resolution questioning the disputed legal status of the UK’s hold over the Chagos Islands in the Indian Ocean was referred to the ICJ.

    The world court, which is based at The Hague, hears disputes over sovereignty and international borders from all over the globe. Greenwood had served one nine-year term as a judge there.

    The letter from Matthew Rycroft, the UK’s permanent representative at the UN, said: “The current deadlock is unlikely to be broken by further rounds of voting.

    “We have therefore consulted our candidate, Sir Christopher Greenwood, who has confirmed that his candidature for re-election to the international court of justice should be withdrawn.

    “In taking this step, we have borne in mind the close relationship that the United Kingdom and India have always enjoyed and will continue to enjoy, and the fact that both candidates fulfil the requirements for election and have already served the court diligently with impartiality and independence.”

    The letter added that had voting been stalemated again, there is a mechanism for resolving disputes – a joint conference between the UN security council and general assembly - but it acknowledged that “some thought needs to be given to this procedure before the next ICJ election in order that it might be used when it is clearly needed”.

    Rycroft added: “The UK has concluded that it is wrong to continue to take up the valuable time of the security council and the UN general assembly with further rounds of elections.

    “The UK congratulates the successful candidates, including Judge Bhandari of India. We are naturally disappointed, but it was a competitive field with six strong candidates.


    “If the UK could not win in this runoff, then we are pleased that it is a close friend like India that has done so instead. We will continue to cooperate closely with India, here in the United Nations and globally.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/law/201...d-court-for-first-time-in-its-71-year-history
     
  2. Golden_Rule

    Golden_Rule Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    High time the world realized to keep the unjust out :azn:
     
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  3. BlackOpsIndia

    BlackOpsIndia Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    Am amicable solution I should say, getting humiliated everyday is not a wise strategy.

    Wait for someone who will start with rape n end with British army on this thread.
     
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  4. Hindustani78

    Hindustani78 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Washington, November 21, 2017 11:26 IST
    Updated: November 21, 2017 13:49 IST

    http://www.thehindu.com/news/intern...ustice-seat/article20609566.ece?homepage=true

    [​IMG]
    United Nations Security Council members cast their vote during a meeting on the election of five members of the International Court of Justice, at the U.N. headquarters in New York. | Photo Credit: AFP


    With Justice Dalveer Bhandari's re-election, this will be the first time in the 70-year history of the U.N.that the U.K. will not be on the world judicial body.

    India scored a major diplomatic victory on Monday as its nominee to the International Court of Justice (ICJ), Dalveer Bhandari, was re-elected after the United Kingdom withdrew its candidate, Christopher Greenwood.

    The U.K. chose to withdraw after it became clear that it would not win the contest in the General Assembly (GA) and it did not have adequate support in the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) for its attempts to derail the voting process itself.

    This is the first time in the 70-year history of the United Nations that the U.K. will not be on the ICJ; and this is the first time that one of the five permanent members of the UNSC lost out to an ordinary member in a race. This is also the first time that one sitting member of the ICJ lost to another sitting member.

    The winning candidate required a majority in both the GA and the UNSC, but 11 rounds of voting until last week ended, with India winning in the GA and the U.K. winning in the UNSC. With the U.K. announcing its exit from the race in the 12th round, Justice Bhandari received 183 of the 193 votes in the GA and secured all the 15 votes in the UNSC after separate and simultaneous elections were held at the U.N. headquarters in New York.

    The U.K. had nine of the 15 UNSC votes in the previous rounds, leading to a stalemate though India had an overwhelming majority in the GA. It initially wanted to suspend the voting process and move to a conference mechanism that has never been used in the history of the U.N. to break the stalemate. But this move needed the approval of the UNSC in an open voting while voting for the ICJ is through a secret ballot.



    [​IMG]
    A view of the United Nations headquarters in New York. This is the first time that one of the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council lost out to an ordinary member in a race. | Photo Credit: Reuters

    As Monday progressed it became clear that the U.K. would not have nine members to publicly support the proposal to suspend further rounds of voting, sources familiar with the developments told The Hindu. “Some members who voted for Britain’s candidate told them that they could not vote for the suspension of the voting process,” a U.N. insider said.

    India's diplomatic outreach
    Meanwhile, India’s diplomatic outreach led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj, Foreign Secretary S. Jaishankar and India’s Permanent Representative to the U.N. Syed Akbaruddin was gathering more support for India in the GA. “It had become clear that India was moving towards getting two-thirds of the votes, 128 of them, in the GA. No judge could have occupied the position on the ICJ after two-thirds of the member countries voted against him,” said a source.

    Around noon, presidents of the UNSC, GA, Mr. Akbaruddin and British Permanent Representative to the U.N. Matthew Rycroft informally met to take stock of the situation. India made it clear that it had no intention to back off, as its support among the member states was clear and demonstrated. By then, some members of UNSC had assured India that they would not support the British proposal to suspend voting and institute an unprecedented conference mechanism.

    One hour before the voting was to begin at 3 p.m., Mr. Rycroft wrote identical letters to the presidents of the UNGA and UNSC that Mr. Greenwood would withdraw from the contest. The presidents read out the letter as the GA and the UNSC met at 3 p.m. for the 12th round of voting. As per rules, voting proceeded simultaneously, with only Justice Bhandari’s name on the ballot.

    All other permanent members of the SC — USA, Russia, France and China — were understood to have been throwing their weight behind the fifth. So was Japan, a non-permament member. But at least some of them were hesitant to vote for suspension of the voting, which stalled the British plans. Mr. Rycroft said in the letter that the current deadlock is unlikely to be broken by further rounds of voting.

    Pleased to see 'close friend' win: U.K.
    Congratulating Justice Bhandari, the U.K. said it would continue to cooperate closely with India at the U.N. and globally. “The U.K. has concluded that it is wrong to continue to take up the valuable time of the UNSC and the GA with further rounds of elections,” Mr. Rycroft said.

    “We are naturally disappointed, but it was a competitive field with six strong candidates,” Mr. Rycroft said. “If the U.K. could not win in this run-off, then we are pleased that it is a close friend like India that has done so instead. We will continue to cooperate closely with India, here in the United Nations and globally,” he said.
     
  5. Hindustani78

    Hindustani78 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    On Tuesday, India’s Dalveer Bhandari was re-elected to the International Court of Justice. Here are the ICJ cases that involved India:
    india Updated: Nov 21, 2017 11:51 IST

    http://www.hindustantimes.com/india...th-pakistan/story-3F7Vy24Z5rgoji4kIKY0SO.html


    India’s Dalveer Bhandari was on Tuesday re-elected to the International Court of Justice, with Britain eventually withdrawing its candidate from a close fight.

    Bhandari and UK’s Christopher Greenwood were locked in a neck-and-neck fight for re-election as the UN could not decide between them after electing four out of five judges to the ICJ.

    Here are the cases at the ICJ that have involved India:

    India vs Pakistan (2017-present)

    In May, India approached the ICJ to save Kulbhushan Jadhav’s life after Pakistan repeatedly refused consular access to the man it alleged was a spy and sentenced him to death.

    The Indian challenge was primarily based on Pakistan violating Vienna convention on consular relations. Among other things, the agreement allows diplomatic representatives to visit their nationals held prisoner by the host country. India also argued that Pakistan had ignored a bilateral treaty on consular access.

    The ICJ has stayed Pakistan’s execution order, and is hearing the case.

    Marshall Islands vs India (2014-2016)

    In 2014, Marshall Islands accused nine countries of failing to comply with the nuclear non-proliferation treaty.

    While the ICJ did not take up cases against a few countries that did not recognise its jurisdiction, it threw out the plea against India in 2016.

    “The court upholds the objection to jurisdiction raised by India,” presiding judge Ronny Abraham said, and therefore the tribunal “cannot proceed to the merits of the case.”

    Pakistan vs India (1999-2000)

    In 1999, Pakistan filed a case alleging that India shot down its aircraft. The neighbouring nation said the ICJ had jurisdiction over the matter, but India rejected it, adding that there was no mention of a treaty between the two countries.

    In 2000, the ICJ’s judgment said “it has no jurisdiction to entertain the application filed by the Islamic Republic of Pakistan.”

    Pakistan vs India (1973)

    In May 1973, Pakistan filed a case over prisoners of war, saying it would transfer 195 of them to Bangladesh for trial in cases of alleged genocide.

    In December 1973, the ICJ said Pakistan had held negotiations with India, resulting in an agreement. “(Pakistan) requested the Court to make an Order officially recording discontinuance of the proceedings in this case,” the court said.

    India vs Pakistan (1971-1972)

    In 1971, India filed a case in connection with the jurisdiction of the International Civil Aviation Organization council. Pakistan had complained to the council that India suspended the neighbour’s civil flights in its territory.

    The ICJ rejected Pakistan’s objections on the question of its competence, finding “that it has jurisdiction to entertain India’s appeal”.

    It, however, held that the ICAO council was competent to entertain Pakistan’s complaint and rejected the appeal made by India against the “decision of the council assuming jurisdiction in those respects.”

    India vs Portugal (1955-1960)

    Portugal said in 1955 India prevented it from exercising the ‘right to passage’ in its territory. The country was then in control of two territories – Dadra and Nagar-Haveli.

    In 1960, the ICJ ruled that “India has not acted contrary to its obligations resulting from Portugal’s right of passage in respect of private persons, civil officials and goods in general.”

    With inputs from agencies

    ***************

    http://www.hindustantimes.com/india...-akbaruddin/story-f2EWbqCZQVwqSZWOJQNHKI.html
    India’s Dalveer Bhandari was on Tuesday re-elected to the International Court of Justice, with Britain eventually withdrawing its candidate from a close fight.
    india Updated: Nov 21, 2017 16:09 IST
    Hindustan Times, New Delhi
    [​IMG]
    India's Permanent Representative to the United Nations Syed Akbaruddin speaks during a reception in the honour of Justice Dalveer Bhandari (L) at the United Nations in New York on Monday. (PTI Photo)
    It is well past midnight in New York, but his day is far from over.

    “I will miss sleeping very very late and waking up very very early at least for some days,” says Syed Akbaruddin, India’s permanent representative to the United Nations as he recounts one of the most hectic diplomatic campaigns India has mounted in recent times. The mission? Getting Justice Dalveer Bhandari re-elected to the International Court of Justice (ICJ). Excerpts from the interview.

    It was both an exhaustive and exhausting campaign. How did it feel to be at the centre of it all, leading the campaign from the front at ground zero?

    First of all, it was a huge team that made all these efforts. I was just another foot soldier in the campaign. There was Prime Minister Narendra Modi guiding the team; external affairs minister Sushma Swaraj giving instructions; the foreign secretary; other secretaries at the headquarters; and Indian envoys at various countries. Everyone worked as a team, and I only happened to be here at the UN around that time. It is the team’s hard work that brought us victory.

    It was quite a fight with the UK, a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC). In hindsight, when did you first realise that the battle could be won?

    It was when the first round of voting occurred at the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA)*. We won 115 in the UNGA while the UK got 76. If you remember, this voting happened without either side getting any time to lobby or work phone lines to canvas for support. The outcome was really a reflection of the UNGA’s mood. So we came to know that the prevailing mood in the general assembly was in our favour, and a huge majority wanted us to win. This is also a reflection of the changing reality in the world, something that the United Nations must take note of.

    Still, did the fear of failing in the UNSC play in the back of your mind?

    Yes. Voting at the security council is an unequal battle. It is an unwritten rule that one permanent member should be supported by all the others. So, given that there are 15 UNSC members (five permanent and 10 non-permanent), Britain had to get just three votes from the 10 non-permanent members to reach the majority mark of eight. As for us, we needed eight out of ten votes (from non-permanent members) to ensure a majority in the security council.

    What was your single-most important focus area to circumvent this unequal battle you would have never won at the UNSC?

    We realised our path to success lay in gaining two-thirds majority in the votes at the UNGA. A candidate who won two-thirds majority never lost an election to the ICJ. In other words, a candidate who just won one-third votes in the UNGA never got elected as a judge to the ICJ. So, the pathway to our success was ensuring that Justice Dalveer Bhandari won two-thirds majority at the UNGA.

    Did you ever expect the UK, which always had a representative in the 15-member ICJ since 1946, to withdraw its candidate?

    Again, we knew that Justice Dalveer Bhandari can make it once we bagged two-thirds majority in the UNGA. The rest would happen the way they should.

    Does this once again show the need to reform the UNSC?

    If planned changes are not brought into organisations such as the United Nations, events like this will do it. Changes don’t always happen by design. What happened in last ten days with regard to the ICJ elections testifies to that. Organisations as old as the UN should change with the times. That’s the lesson here.

    What next, then?

    Again, we should not forget that reforms can happen by chance, not always by design. It is obvious that there is an urgent need to reform the security council. It’s also about how everyone comes together to decide how to go about it. That is what we are immediately focusing on.

    (*Note: A candidate has to win a majority in the UNGA as well as the UNSC in simultaneous elections to secure victory at the ICJ.)


    ****************

    The Council is composed of 15 Members:

     
  6. Hindustani78

    Hindustani78 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Prime Minister's Office
    21-November, 2017 10:32 IST
    PM congratulates Justice Dalveer Bhandari on being re-elected to the International Court of Justice


    The Prime Minister, Shri Narendra Modi has congratulated Justice Dalveer Bhandari on being re-elected to the International Court of Justice.

    "I congratulate Justice Dalveer Bhandari on being re-elected to the International Court of Justice. His re-election is a proud moment for us.

    Congratulations to External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj and her entire team at Ministry of External Affairs and diplomatic missions for their untiring efforts that have led to India’s re-election to ICJ. Our deep gratitude to all the members of UNGA as well as UNSC for their support and trust in India", the Prime Minister said.

    ***
     
  7. Guynextdoor

    Guynextdoor Lt. Colonel SENIOR MEMBER

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    @BMD your entry into this thread has been predicted :)
     
  8. Bloom 17

    Bloom 17 2nd Lieutant IDF NewBie

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    Naa we passed that discussion on another thread already...
     
  9. Pundrick

    Pundrick Lieutenant FULL MEMBER

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    "Guy please learn to behave like a citizen of a mature democracy, don't abuse the loser country".






    PS : Not applicable to Britishers and Pakistani. Unki ko Keh ke Lena B*****d.
     
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  10. Hindustani78

    Hindustani78 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    The Court is composed of 15 judges, who are elected by an absolute majority in both the General Assembly (97 votes) and Security Council (8 votes). Five seats come up for election every three years. There is no bar on consecutive terms.



    The General Assembly and the Security Council, meeting concurrently but independently from each other, filled the final vacancy on the International Court of Justice (ICJ). Dalveer Bhandari (India) was elected by both bodies for a nine-year term beginning on 6 February 2018, joining the four justices elected on 9 November from a list of six candidates.

    Syed Akbaruddin (centre), Permanent Representative of India to the UN, receives congratulations from a General Assembly delegate.
    20 November 2017
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    After five rounds of simultaneous voting that ran into the early evening, the Assembly and the Council – which met independently of each other – re-elected three current judges, Ronny Abraham (France) and Abdulqawi Ahmed Yusuf (Somalia), and Antônio Augusto Cançado Trindade (Brazil), while also choosing one new justice, Nawaf Salam (Lebanon).


    20 November 2017 – The General Assembly and the Security Council today elected the fifth judge to the International Court of Justice (ICJ) concluding the 2017 elections to the principal judicial organ of the United Nations.

    Dalveer Bhandari, of India, received the absolute majority of votes in elections – conducted independently, but concurrently – at the Security Council and the General Assembly.

    GA/11971
    9 November 2017

    The remaining 10 judges sitting on the Court, whose terms would expire either in 2021 or 2024 were: Hisadhi Owada (Japan); Peter Tomka (Slovakia); Mohamed Bennouna (Morocco); Xue Hanqin (China); Joan E. Donoghue (United States); Giorgio Gaja (Italy); Julia Sebutinde (Uganda); Patrick Lipton Robinson (Jamaica); James Richard Crawford (Australia); and Kirill Gevorgian (Russian Federation).

    ************
    GA/11978
    20 November 2017

    Mr. Bhandari was elected by a vote of 183 in favour to zero against, with 10 abstentions, having received more than the required majority of votes in the Assembly.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2017
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  11. Hindustani78

    Hindustani78 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    By: PTI | Washington | Published: November 22, 2017 9:12 am
    [​IMG]
    Dalveer Bhandari in New York on Monday. (Photo: PTI)


    The spokesperson was asked about reform of the UNSC in view of the differences that emerged between the General Assembly and the Security Council during the just concluded election to the ICJ.

    http://indianexpress.com/article/wo...-election-but-opposes-expansion-of-unsc-veto/



    The US has congratulated Justice Dalveer Bhandari for his re-election to the ICJ, but asserted that it is against any change in the current veto structure of the UN Security Council, even as it favorus a modest expansion of the 15-membered body.

    India’s Dalveer Bhandari was yesterday re-elected to the International Court of Justice (ICJ) with more than two-thirds of the UN members backing him, forcing Britain to withdraw its candidate amidst high drama in the hard-fought race to the world court.

    Responding to questions on reform of the 15-membered apex wing of the world body, a State Department spokesperson said: The United States remains open in principle to the idea of UN Security Council reform, including a modest expansion of the Security Council.

    “We believe a reformed council must reflect the realities of the 21st century and be able to meet the challenges of this century with enhanced — and not diminished — effectiveness and efficiency. To this end, we remain opposed to any alteration or expansion of the veto, the spokesperson told PTI.

    The spokesperson was asked about reform of the UNSC in view of the differences that emerged between the General Assembly and the Security Council during the just concluded election to the ICJ.

    For the last remaining seat, the General Assembly and the UNSC had to carry 11 round of voting before judge Christopher Greenwood from Britain withdrew from the race, leaving India’s nominee Bhandari to be re-elected for a nine-year term.

    “We congratulate Judge Dalveer Bhandari of India for his re-election to the International Court of Justice, as well as the other candidates who were elected or re-elected…,” the spokesperson said, thanking Judge Greenwood for his service to the ICJ.

    However, the official refused to comment on the 11 rounds of voting.

    “We’re not going to comment on the prior rounds of voting. In the end, Judge Bhandari received the unanimous support of the UNSC and an absolute majority in the UN General Assembly for his re-election to the ICJ,” the spokesperson said.


    **************
    http://www.thehindu.com/news/nation...n-last-mile/article20667441.ece?homepage=true

    We knew we had a tough task ahead right from the word go, says an MEA official

    Monday’s win for India’s nominee to the International Court of Justice (ICJ), Justice Dalveer Bhandari, was unprecedented in many ways, but not the first time that India nearly missed the post due to delays in nominating him, officials and lawyers familiar with the procedure said.

    In 2011, India had failed to put up a candidate for the Asian group vacancy that had come up with the retirement of the Japanese justice, and rectified the miss only in 2012, when a by-election came up, and Justice Bhandari was named. This time around, Justice Bhandari’s nomination was announced only in June this year, while his main rival in the ‘Asian’ grouping Nawaf Salam, had nearly two years for his campaign.

    “We were late in announcing our candidature,” a senior MEA official conceded, explaining the process was not just dependent on the Indian government. The ICJ’s procedure stipulates that each candidate must be proposed by the “national group” of the Permanent Court of Arbitrage, which at present is a panel that includes former Justices H.L. Dattu and G.T. Nanavati as well as senior lawyers Mukul Rohatgi and Harish Salve. According to the official, the panel took an inordinately long time to forward Justice Bhandari’s name.

    Geographical break-up

    There were more difficulties. While there is no formal stipulation on the subject, the ICJ’s composition of 15 judges follows a geographical break-up: 3 for Africa, 2 for Latin America, 3 for Asia, 2 for East Europe, and 5 for Western Europe and other States, and has nearly always had one winning candidate from each of the P-5 or permanent members of the UN Security Council.

    In addition, the only other Asian candidate besides Justice Bhandari was Mr. Salam, who had been the Lebanese Ambassador to the United Nations since 2007, and was a well known figure.

    “We knew we had a tough task ahead right from the word go,” said the MEA official. Over the next few months, the government, led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj and Ministers of State M.J. Akbar and V.K. Singh made the ICJ election a priority in their bilateral exchanges, pushing for support from every member of the UN General Assembly, even though many were already committed according to their multilateral groupings like the P-5, European Union (EU), African Union (AU), Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) etc for the six candidates from France, Zambia, Brazil, Lebanon, Somalia, India and the U.K.

    Group dynamics

    “No one is certain about outcome of such a multi-cornered election,” an Indian diplomat told The Hindu, “After the first round, when everyone votes for almost everyone, group dynamics take over and votes drop dramatically for candidates not from groups.”

    What surprised even the Indian officials, however, was the low vote count the United Kingdom received in every round from the UN General Assembly.

    “This is the most significant part of the election as it reveals not just the fact that the U.K. wasn’t as popular as it thought, but that many countries are fed up of the P-5 claim of a god-given right to win all UN elections,” said former Indian representative to the UN

    Chinmaya Garekhan, who had overseen the election of Justice R.S. Pathak to the ICJ in 1989.

    Sushma’s role

    Eventually the last mile was run by all the government’s arms, with Ms. Swaraj herself speaking to her counterparts in 60 countries to support India against the U.K.

    The British candidate Christopher Greenwood also faced flak personally, as his was the legal advice that sanctioned U.K. to take part in the Iraq invasion in 2003, and India looked close to winning its target of two-thirds of the UN General Assembly on Monday, when the U.K. decided to bow out of the race.

    “We ran a positive campaign,” said the MEA official, when asked about the controversies, “This is a victory not just for India’s voice but for the developing world, that backed us.”
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2017
  12. Hindustani78

    Hindustani78 2nd Lieutant FULL MEMBER

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    Washington, November 22, 2017 22:34 IST
    Updated: November 23, 2017 07:50 IST
    http://www.thehindu.com/news/intern...ng-uks-exit/article20667399.ece?homepage=true

    After India raised the issue with Trump administration, it suspended its campaign for British nominee
    The United States refused to support the United Kingdom’s demand for suspending the voting in the General Assembly and Security Council and to invoke an unprecedented conference mechanism to elect a judge to the International Court of Justice (ICJ), forcing the latter to withdraw from the contest altogether, on Monday.

    Indian and American sources told The Hindu on condition of anonymity that while the U.S. continued to vote for U.K’s candidate Christopher Greenwood against India’s Dalveer Bhandari, it balked at the idea of interfering in the voting process on Monday. India was on its way to getting two thirds of the votes if voting had continued in the General Assembly. In the 15-member Security Council (SC), India was getting five against Britain’s nine, in earlier rounds.

    On the question of constituting the conference mechanism, the nine supporters of the U.K. splintered, according to multiple sources. America was the first to switch, and two other permanent members followed. “American position did it for the U.K.,” a source said. “On another day later, America may have supported the proposal. But stopping the voting appeared brazen,” he said.

    Earlier in the process, the U.S. had actively campaigned for the U.K. and India raised the issue at the “political level” with the Trump administration, which immediately ordered a suspension of the campaign, sources said.

    Indian interlocutors told the U.S. that while New Delhi appreciated American compulsions for voting for the U.K., campaigning for one friend at the cost of the other was not fair.

    Hours before the voting on November 13, Gonzalo Gallegos, Senior Adviser at the U.S. Mission to the UN, wrote to several countries urging them to vote for Mr. Greenwood. “The U.S. strongly supports Judge Greenwood and hopes that the UNSC and the UNGA will elect him…” he wrote to member countries.

    Additionally, Donald Camp, a former State Department official, lobbied with several south and central Asian countries on behalf of the U.K. The U.S. also invoked the principle of regional representation on ICJ to buttress its argument. “…we would be troubled if the regional balance on the ICJ would shift if Judge Greenwood were not to be re-elected,” Mr. Gallegos wrote, in an oblique reference to the fact that Lebanon was already elected to the ICJ.

    When the U.K. floated the conference idea, the U.S. was initially supportive. India took up the issue again, and it became unsustainable also due to the swelling UNGA opinion in India’s favour.

    When Presidents of the GA and SC met with India’s Permanent Representative Syed Akbaruddin and British Permanent Representative Matthew Rycroft ahead of the voting on Monday, the die was cast, but the U.K made a last ditch effort to hold its ground. Soon after the meeting, with three permanent SC members objecting to its proposal to suspend voting, the U.K announced it was withdrawing from the contest.

    “But for this negative campaign by the U.S, India would have won a two-thirds victory in the GA on November 13,” a U.N insider explained. India ended up with 121, seven short of the two third mark of 128. After India raised it with higher officials in the Trump administration, the U.S asked its diplomats to cease the campaign.
     
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