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India’s Mars mission: Mangalyaan to begin its 10-month journey on October 28

Discussion in 'Indian Military Doctrine' started by layman, Sep 22, 2013.

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  1. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    October 28 is set to be the next big day for the Indian space programme as the Mangalyaan (or Mars Orbiter) will lift-off from Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh that day using the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle or PSLV.

    The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) is getting ready for the launch of the Rs. 450-crore satellite, which weighs 1350 kg. It will take about 10 months to reach the orbit of Mars traversing a distance of over 400 million kilometres.

    “The satellite is in the final stages of testing. We have also got thumbs up from the review committee,†an elated ISRO Chairman K Radhakrishnan told NDTV.
    Mr Radhakrishnan says Mangalyaan will carry five Indian scientific instruments to study the atmosphere of the Red Planet, look for traces of Methane which could indicate if life exists on Mars, take colour photos of the planet and analyse the presence of water there.
    In 2008, India successfully launched its maiden mission to the moon, Chandrayaan-1, which brought back the first clinching evidence of the presence of water on the lunar surface. Some even suggested that this is really now an Asian space race between India and China – the two regional rivals – on who reaches Mars first.

    Other experts suggest that it is not so much the inter-planetary configuration but earth bound geo-political considerations that may be weighing on India’s mind referring to the space rivalry between India and China. “We are not racing with anybody and the Indian Mars mission has its own relevance,†says Mr Radhakrishnan. He, however, admits that there is an element of ‘national pride’ involved with the mission.

    Some suggest after the success of Chandrayaan-1, the natural stepping stone for India was to try to reach Mars. Mr Radhakrishnan said, “We had to prepare the spacecraft on a fast-track mode as we had a deadline to meet. Though it is a complex spacecraft, but our people have done it.†He also said that it is a critical mission for the country because after Chandrayaan-1 ISRO is looking to go deeper into the space, on a longer voyage.

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  2. The Drdo Guy

    The Drdo Guy Captain SENIOR MEMBER

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    Best Of Luck team ISRO.
     
  3. S K Mittal

    S K Mittal Major SENIOR MEMBER

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    :tup: best of luck to ISRO team from me also
     
  4. BMD

    BMD Colonel ELITE MEMBER

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  5. Manmohan Yadav

    Manmohan Yadav Brigadier STAR MEMBER

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    Awesome ISRO !!!!!!!


    And at the same time, Booooo DRDO !!!!!! :troll:
     
  6. Soumya

    Soumya Major STAR MEMBER

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    Best of luck ISRO :tup:

    Make us proud :cheers:
     
  7. layman

    layman Aurignacian STAR MEMBER

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    Great News Awesome.... :tup:
     
  8. Rock n Rolla

    Rock n Rolla Lt. Colonel STAR MEMBER

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    Mars Orbiter Mission

    Mangalyaan is a Sanskrit word which means Mars-Craft.

    Mars Orbiter Mission is ISRO's first interplanetary mission to planet Mars with a spacecraft designed to orbit Mars in an elliptical orbit of 372 km by 80,000 km. The polar Satellite Launch Vehicle PSLV will be used to inject the spacecraft from SDSC, SHAR in the 250 X 23000 km orbit with an inclination of 17.864 degree. As the minimum energy transfer opportunity from Earth to Mars occurs once in 26 months, the opportunity in 2013 demands a cumulative incremental velocity of 2.592 km/sec.

    In Chandrayaan-1, ISRO had to deal with a distance of about four lakh km, while in the case of Mars it’s 4000 lakh km.

    The spacecraft has been provided with augmented radiation shielding for its prolonged exposure in the Van Allen belt.

    Due to the long range from Earth to Mars, there is a communication delay of 20 minutes one way itself. For this reason, ISRO has built high level of onboard autonomy within Mars orbiter.

    Mangalyaan Weight : 1,350 kg

    Mangalyaan has a 15 kg scientific payload, it consists of five instruments:

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    Methane Sensor For Mars (MSM) : Primary Objective - Detect presence of Methane

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    Mars Colour Camera (MCC) : Primary Objective - Optical imaging, it would also be possible to take pictures of two satellites of Mars - Phobos and Deimos.

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    Mars Exospheric Neutral Composition Analyser (MENCA) : Primary Objective - Study the neutral composition of the Martian upper atmosphere

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    TIR Spectrometer (TIS) : Primary Objective - Map surface composition and mineralogy

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    Lyman-Alpha Photometer (LAP) : Primary Objective - Escape processes of Mars upper atmosphere through Deuterium/Hydrogen

    These will study Martian atmosphere, surface and minerals. The main objective is to find methane.

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    A graphical representation of the Mars Orbiter mission.

    [​IMG]
    The Mars mission spacecraft and its payload.
     
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