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India’s transition from Receiver to Donor of Foreign Aid

Discussion in 'World Economy' started by sunny_10, Jan 13, 2013.

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  1. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    the above news of post#74, and then India - UK conflicts occurred when French Rafale won MRCA deal :coffee:

    in fact, the above news is welcomed and its good if the British government live in the above belief. as it would at least avoid "Pig Talks" before any big deal/ tender like MRCA :facepalm:

    :tsk:
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2014
  2. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    Indian side is facing real tough time because of Economic Crisis of European Nations. and only one statement i like in the above news, that is, India's wish to " 'voluntarily' give up the Aid" but they couldn't, as British side made them accept the Aid :tsk:. and then all the Pigs Talks start..... :facepalm:
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2014
  3. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    the world is changing and the Philantrocapitalism is now the biggest challenge imposed on India from those falling economies who are worried from this changing world. there are always many good reasons they keep, to do those few wrongs which may help the falling economies maintain food supply for their future generations. and how India will tackle this type of "Guerrilla War", the Time will tell us :tup:
     
  4. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    Those who are using Technologies are not the same people who developed it

    also, reverse remittances are little more than the inflows, post#60, while its sent by mostly those Indian migrants, businessmen doing business in foreign countries and high qualified professionals both, who pay very high taxes on their money as Indians are the highest incomes group in the western nations.......

    also, its only the high qualified professionals of developing countries who helped these US/UK maintain food supply for years by running their industries, by developing new technologies which they sold in world market. for example, Mr B.Gates is the richest man of world not because he sold the technologies developed by Americans :no:. but its the hard working high qualified professional migrants, who came under skill quota and helped these American firms have these technologies. its not the cultural background of US/UK which helped them have these technologies, they use. those who developed high techs and those who are using these technologies are two different people, of two different cultural backgrounds. taking drugs, fcuk here and there and use these high techs to make slaves in different parts of the world is a quite different issue, as compare to develop those high technologies by themselves :wave:

    we generally say, even the very basic software of Microsoft, Hotmail, was developed by an Indian migrant, Mr Sabir Bhatia. similarly, the software's sold by Microsoft were never developed by US's born people :disagree:, but by the hard working migrant professionals of developing countries who came there under skill quota of different Demand Lists of US/Australia/UK...... and it will be interesting to see, how long will it really take these "slave makers" to come our of the "Bill Gates fantasy" they live in, which is in parallel with the drug effects on them, they always live in.... men are labors and women prostitutes and make slaves in different parts of world by uniting people as a nation, and how long all these will continue under the Bill Gates's fantasy they live in, we all are waiting to see :coffee:

     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2014
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  5. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    i made few comments on Mr Gate's Today's comment in this regard as below. i think it may have a place in thisa thread too :tup:

    Mr Bill Gates Comment, "What does it cost to save the life of a child? The answer may surprise you: http://b-gat.es/1jUl4n6" :coffee:


    My Comment on Mr Gate's Twitter on 2nd February 2014:-

    1st; at present, its all about awareness of the information available, but I do favor foreign aid for the Least developed countries

    2nd; and i do give a credit to a developing country like India, which certainly doesn't need foreign aid, and also help others by Aid :india:

    3rd; im running a thread to detail Indian support for LDCs. and the best i like here, India's support for scholarship/technologies for them

    4th; post#17 is the best news (in this thread) as below. which we demand from developed nations too, more scholarships than aid :tup:

    http://www.indiandefence.com/forums...-receiver-donor-foreign-aid-2.html#post249989
    :cheers:


    (its simple that LDCs can't live without Foreign Aid, and most of the Brit population aren't qualified enough to be part of knowledge based discussions, as per my experience. comparing India, China type developing countries with Least Developed Countries is one of the excellent example in regard....... its simply a crime to support idea to withdraw Aids from LDCs, as these Aid generally means for helping LDCs on very basic issues of life. even if India is a developing country with highest poor population too, it may manage to offer over $1.0billion+ foreign Aids for many LDCs, as part of India's Annual Budget........ there must always be a test of 'mentality' too, before we invite political talks on international levels, and we always find UK based people to be living in the ideas of mid 20th century, to keep feeding their mentality of superiority, without any credibility :tsk:. putting emerging economies like India/ China in the category of LDCs, and hence, either Aid to India/China or to none of LDCs too, is just a sign of their poor educational background, backed by poor mentality of mid 20th century they keep while participating in any political talks :facepalm:

    => http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Least_developed_country#Current_LDCs


    here, its true that corruption is high in poor countries, and very high in LDCs and this is how it works, as life is tough in developing countries, no Welfare so people do adopt corruption some times. and Idea of more scholarships for different courses to them does means to make them stand on their own. but corruption can't be the reason to hide the intentions behind foreign aid to LDCs, which is about helping very poor for basics of life, even if a part of it goes in corruption.......
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2014
  6. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    India gives $5-billion aid to Africa :india:

    India loosened its pursestring to woo Africa on Tuesday with Prime Minister Manmohan Singh announcing a multi-billion dollar in aid while inaugurating the second India-Africa Forum Summit in the capital of Ethiopia. :ranger:

    Amid thunderous applause from the leaders and representatives of 15 African countries at the African Union headquarters in Addis Ababa, Singh announced a line of credit worth $5 billion "to help achieve the development goals of Africa". "There is a new economic growth story emerging from Africa. Africa possesses all the prerequisites to become a major growth pole of the worldâ€Â¦ India will work with Africa to realise its vast potentialâ€Â¦ It is in this spirit that I wish to outline some initiatives for the consideration of our African partners," Singh said on the eve of Africa Day.

    The $5.4 billion aid offered at the first Summit in Delhi in 2008 focused on regional integration through infrastructure development. Singh said, "I believe we have reason to be satisfied with what we have achieved since 2008. But our people expect much more and we have to work hard to deliver on these expectations. :ranger:

    He also offered an additional $700 million to establish new institutions and training programmes in consultation with the African Union and its institutions. There was also support for the development of a new Ethiopia-Djibouti Railway line to the tune of $300 million. :india:

    Unlike China capacity building has been India's focus in Africa over decades. It may be recalled that half of the Cabinet in an erstwhile Ethiopian government had studied or were trained in India. The area of capacity building has been New Delhi's strength and Singh once again did not disappoint his African counterparts.

    He announced creation of several new institutions at the Pan African level across various sectors - food, textile, weather forecasting, life and earth sciences and agriculture and rural development. :truestory:

    African students are a common sight in Indian cities be it Bangalore, Pune, Mumbai, Delhi or Kolkata. To encourage them further government announced that an India-Africa virtual university will be set up to meet the demands among Africans for higher studies in Indian institutions. :thumb:

    Towards this end 10,000 new scholarships will be offered under the proposed university.

    The PM also announced an increase by 900 training slots for the Africans under the Indian Technical and Economic Cooperation (ITEC). Therefore a total of 2500 training positions under ITEC will be offered for the next three years to the Africans and total scholarships offered during the same period will amount to 22,000. :truestory:

    At the bilateral level, it was also proposed to establish institutes for English language training, information technology, entrepreneurship development and vocational training across African countries. And as part of new initiatives in the social and economic sectors India will also establish rural technology parks, food testing laboratories, food processing business incubation centres and centres on geo- informatics applications and rural development. :ranger:

    In order to bring together business leaders from both sides and deepen trade ties, an India- Africa business council will be set up. :tup:

    A strong votary of peace building in Africa for decades that would lead to prosperity, India made yet another key announcement.

    Singh said, "I am happy to announce that India will contribute $2 million for the African Union Mission in Somalia." Stability in the Horn of Africa, as Somalia is known, is also key in addressing the menace of piracy, of which India has been a victim.
    Air connectivity has been a bottleneck between Indian cities and African nations.

    This has not helped in increasing peopleto- people contacts. Acknowledging this, PM said, "One of the biggest gaps in our interaction is that of insufficient air connectivityâ€Â¦ To begin with, India would be happy to increase the access of African airlines to Indian cities in a significant manner over the next three years."

    India on its part sought Africa's support for its bid for a permanent seat in the UN Security Council.

    "The current international economic and political situation is far from favourable, particularly for developing countries... The world faces new challenges in assuring food and energy security. Global institutions of governance are outmoded and under stress," Singh said.

    African nations had overwhelmingly voted for India in the election for non permanent seat at the UN. The continent also hopes to get two slots in the expanded Security Council. :tup: :india:

    India gives $5-billion aid to Africa : Rest of the World, News - India Today
     
  7. sunny_10

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    22,000 new scholarships for African students in various academic courses :india:

    New Delhi, Mar 1 (ANI): Highlighting India's commitment to development in Africa, Minister of State for External Affairs Preneet Kaur said here on Thursday that 22,000 new scholarships for African students in various academic courses and training programmes, including special agriculture scholarships and C.V. Raman fellowships have been made available.

    Kaur, who was addressing the inaugural session of India-Africa Science and Technology Ministerial Conference, said proposals for the institutional strengthening of identified institutions in Africa and the transfer of need based technologies have also been initiated.

    "There is a provision for 22,000 new scholarships for African students in various academic courses and training programmes including special agriculture scholarships and C.V. Raman fellowships," said Kaur.

    "As per India's commitment to assist African countries in the field of Science and Technology, proposals for institutional strengthening of identified institutions in Africa and transfer of need based technologies have also been initiated," she added.

    She informed that her ministry has duly secured approvals from the Union Cabinet to support these initiatives through its "Aid to Africa" budget.

    Kaur also said that India has successfully implemented the Pan-African e-Network Project, including tele-education, tele-medicine and connectivity between leaders in 47 African countries and an agreement has also been signed for its implementation in the 48th country, South Sudan recently.

    Under the framework of the Science and Technology Initiatives for Africa, Department of Science and Technology in partnership with Ministry of External Affairs organised the 'India-Africa Science and Technology Ministers Conference'.

    This major ministerial level event has being organised in close coordination with the African Union Commission and is being attended by science and technology ministers from across the African continent along with senior official from various countries. he event is expected to provide a platform for the advocacy, outreach and commitment of India under the framework of the New Science and Technology Cooperation Initiative with Africa.

    The ministerial conference also intends to help to develop linkages and also secure the interests and commitments of the African partners to this Indian initiative. (ANI)

    22,000 new scholarships for African students in various academic courses: Preneet Kaur
     
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    India’s foreign aid program catches up with its global ambitions

    Citing its newfound economic strength, India revealed plans to reorient its positioning in the aid community just over a decade ago.

    “A stage has come in our development where we should now, firstly, review our dependence on external donors. Second, extend support to the national efforts of other developing countries,” said then-Indian Finance Minister Jaswant Singh in February 2003. :india:

    Since then, India’s ambition of transitioning from aid recipient to donor hasn’t panned out completely. Despite its increasingly dismissive posture toward Western aid donors, the Indian government still receives billions of dollars in foreign aid money each year. In 2011, India’s official development assistance to gross national income ratio stood at 0.2 percent, on a par with Egypt and Angola and up from 0.1 percent in 2003.

    Yet even as India remains among the largest recipients of foreign aid, the country has come a long way toward bolstering its standing as an emerging donor. In its latest budget unveiled in February, the Indian government set aside nearly $1.3 billion for foreign assistance in 2013-14, a fourfold jump from 2003-04. Over the past four years, Indian foreign aid spending has grown annually by an average 32 percent. :coffee:

    [​IMG]

    Much like its BRICS peers, New Delhi is keen on enhancing its global reputation through its foreign aid program. Experts on Indian foreign assistance have told Devex that India is likely to continue ramping up aid spending despite fiscal pressures brought about by its recent economic slowdown.

    “The intensity, volume and scope of [Indian] aid giving has remained immune from the government’s austerity drives which have reduced the spending power of various ministries,” Shanthie Mariet D’Souza, a research fellow with the Institute of South Asian Studies at the National University of Singapore, pointed out.

    Some members of the parliament in New Delhi have been less confident of the Indian foreign aid program’s budgetary position. Just last month, a standing committee of India’s lower house of parliament warned that the Ministry of External Affairs’ budget was no longer commensurate with its foreign aid and diplomatic activities.

    Technical cooperation continues to account for the bulk of Indian foreign assistance. In 2012-13, Indian spending on technical cooperation activities reached $589 million, representing 58 percent of the country’s foreign aid budget. The Indian government also makes sizeable contributions to multilateral organizations, including the U.N. Development Program and the World Health Organization. :india:

    USAID-style aid agency delayed yet again

    In 2007, Indian Finance Minister P. Chidambaram announced the government’s intention to establish a full-fledged Indian aid agency. But despite repeated pronouncements from New Delhi in the years since, the agency that would have been modeled after the U.S. Agency for International Development has yet to materialize.

    New Delhi’s aid program is mostly under the purview of the Ministry of External Affairs, which taps specialists from within its ranks and across the Indian government to carry out its programming. India has also channeled its aid money through other ministries, however, including the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry of Defense. The proposed USAID-style aid agency would have consolidated the administration of Indian foreign aid activities under one roof.

    In January 2012, the Indian government launched a coordinating and monitoring body for Indian foreign assistance within the Ministry of External Affairs called the Development Partnership Administration. Dweep Chanana, an expert on Indian foreign aid who is currently a director with UBS’ philanthropic division, told Devex the DPA could eventually evolve into a full-fledged aid agency.

    Yet while the creation of the DPA is widely acknowledged as a positive step for the decentralized and fragmented Indian aid program, many observers caution the Indian foreign aid and diplomacy apparatus remains woefully understaffed.

    Thus far, the Ministry of External Affairs has assigned only 20 staff members to the DPA. Moreover, the ministry’s overstretched diplomatic corps of 900 foreign service officers — roughly equal to that of Singapore — is raising valid questions over India’s ability to engage effectively with its development partners overseas. New Delhi is increasingly looking to its diplomatic missions to appraise funding requests from other governments.

    “This is a general problem for India’s foreign service. There are not enough diplomats,” Chanana asserted.

    Focus close to home

    In line with its status as a regional power, India has been a leading aid donor to its smaller neighbors Bhutan and Nepal since the 1950s. The two countries have historically received the lion’s share of Indian foreign assistance.

    India’s economic considerations for its aid program are on display in Bhutan, where its assistance focuses on developing the hydropower sector. The Indian government openly acknowledges that it intends to buy back much of the electricity generated through its hydropower assistance to the country. In 2012-13, Bhutan claimed 36 percent ($213 million) of India’s technical cooperation spending.

    Meanwhile, small-scale development projects in Nepal’s health and education sectors have emerged as priority investments for Indian foreign aid. Nepal received 8 percent ($49 million) of India’s technical cooperation budget in 2012-13.

    And in a development that has been strongly encouraged by the United States, Afghanistan has rapidly moved up the Indian aid agenda since the fall of the Taliban regime in 2001. Now the second-largest recipient of Indian foreign aid after Bhutan, Afghanistan garnered 15 percent ($89 million) of Indian technical cooperation spending in 2012-13. A new parliament building in Kabul, a hydroelectric dam in Herat province as well as community-level development initiatives are among the projects backed by the Indian government.

    Polls suggest India’s aid program in Afghanistan has been generally well-received by Afghans — perhaps no surprise given the two countries’ long-standing cultural ties. As Afghanistan braces for reduced aid levels in light of the NATO drawdown, there are some signs demand for Indian development engagement is growing in the country.

    “When I visited Jalalabad, the TV station manager wanted more of India’s assistance in training of local journalists … In Kandahar, women at an Indian medical facility wanted more medical help,” D’Souza said to Devex as she recounted her recent field visits to Afghanistan.

    The Indian government emphasizes that its aid activities in Afghanistan and elsewhere are demand-driven, a claim which has been supported to some extent by Indian aid experts, including D’Souza.

    Expanding to Africa

    Yet even as much of India’s aid money remains close to home, India has also extended the reach of its assistance well beyond South Asia. In large part through its deputation of technical experts abroad, the Indian aid program now spans more than 60 countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America. :coffee:

    India has been particularly keen on expanding its aid engagement with Africa. In 2012-13, African countries received 7 percent ($43 million) of India’s technical cooperation budget, up from 4 percent in 2011-12. The emerging donor stresses its willingness to share lessons from its own development with Africa.

    “India will work with Africa to realize its vast potential … We do not have all the answers but we have some experience in nation building which we are happy to share with our African brothers and sisters,” Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh told African heads of state attending the second India-Africa Forum Summit in Addis Ababa in 2011.

    In Addis Ababa, Singh committed $700 million in assistance to establish educational institutions and training programs across Africa, including in Uganda, Ghana, Botswana and Burundi. The Indian prime minister also announced $5 billion in lines of credit — largely tied to the purchase of Indian goods and services — to African countries. The Indian government is expected to make further aid commitments for the continent at the third India-Africa Forum Summit in the summer of 2014. :coffee:

    The Indian aid program has already drawn upon its strengths in the ICT sector to create Africa’s largest tele-education and telemedicine initiative, the $125 million Pan-African e-Network. Kicked off in 2006, India’s flagship aid initiative in the continent now connects 47 African countries with leading schools and hospitals in India through satellite and fiber-optic links.

    Devex.com
    May 13, 2013


    http://www.respondanet.com/Asia/indias-foreign-aid-program-catches-up-with-its-global-ambitions.html
     
  9. sunny_10

    sunny_10 BANNED BANNED

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    here, in between 2009-10 to 2013-14, we find around 3 times jump in India's foreign assistance for other countries :coffee:
     
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